Insect: Grasshoppers and locusts

Find, identify & discuss the insects of SANParks

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jaapvandijk
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Unread post by jaapvandijk »

I will than just post a pic of mine.
Can anyone tell me what species this is?
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Imberbe
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Unread post by Imberbe »

It is what is known as a "Bush Locust" which is a general name for a specific family of locusts (including Phymateus leprosus / Phymateus baccatus).
Some members of the family are poisonous, and advertise this through bright colouring on their bodies.
The family is also un-able to produce sounds because they lack the "file and scraper" apparatus of other grashoppers.
The Bush Locusts is known to damage crops.
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PhilQ
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Unread post by PhilQ »

With expert help the riddle what species this grasshopper is has now been resolved:
The grasshopper in your photo is indeed a member of the family Pamphagidae. It is a female of the genus Lobosceliana (unfortunately, it would be impossible to tell which species of Lobosceliana based on a picture alone.)
Species of this genus are highly sexually dimorphic, and while females are completely wingless, the males have long, leathery wings, and produce very loud stridulations.


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Re: Grasshoppers and locusts

Unread post by flying cheetah »

Does anybody know the exact scientific name of this grasshopper? Saw this fellow in KwaZuluNatal.

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Akukho nyon' endiz' ingahlali phansi. (Zulu)
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oddesy
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Re: Grasshoppers and locusts

Unread post by oddesy »

well from the features id say its definitely part of the Pyrgomorphidae family which is all the foam grasshoppers.

the closest species looks like it could be the common milkweed locust (Phymateus viridipes)
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Re: Grasshoppers and locusts

Unread post by flying cheetah »

Here is another one, also seen in KwaZuluNatal. Any ideas :hmz:

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Akukho nyon' endiz' ingahlali phansi. (Zulu)
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Imberbe
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Re: Grasshoppers and locusts

Unread post by Imberbe »

It is one of the family of "Foam grasshoppers."

Here is a description of another one of the family, the same basics apply.


Imberbe wrote:It is the "Koppie Foam Grasshopper".

It is a flightless grasshopper found over large parts of S.A. The red colouring is a warning signal to predators that it is poisonous. It extracts heart poisons from the milkweeds it feeds on, and exudes these in a foam when molested. Known to be fatal to dogs.
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maiper
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Re: Insect ID needed

Unread post by maiper »

Is there any insect expert that knows what kind of grasshopper this fiery thing is? Saw it in Boulders, near the penguins

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Jon Richfield
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Re: Insect ID needed

Unread post by Jon Richfield »

Immature Pyrgomorphids generally differ from the adults in colour and behaviour.
For one thing, in the first few stages the nymphs (or larvae, modern entomologists are sceptical about the validity of the distinction, but suit yourself, it is harmless at worst), the nymphs as I say, tend to swarm somewhat.
Those that emerge from one or a few neighbouring egg purses, will stick together and feed and move in a mass.
Such youngsters commonly are shiny, waxy black with little spots of vivid red or yellow.
In a mass like that they scare off many of their possible predators, and naive predators quickly learn that there is not much to catch and eat apart from a sickening, poisonous secretion.
Many insects with warning colouration form such defensive masses.
You probably have seen similar groups of red Pyrrhocorid stinkbug nymphs on plants from time to time.
As the young Pyrgomorphids grow and pass through their various instars, they become less sociable and the red spots in their colouration become larger until they take over and develop into the adult pattern.
I should guess that the one in the picture was in its last, or just possibly second last, instar.
I hope that someone finds that helpful.
Cheers.
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charbel
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Help identification - Grasshopper

Unread post by charbel »

Dear friends,

Could you please help me identifying this grasshopper we saw in the Masorini Heritage Site at January 20th 2011?

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normana53
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Re: Help identification - Grasshopper

Unread post by normana53 »

Looks to be an "Elegant Grasshopper" Zonocerus elegans.
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kellyee21
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Re: Insect ID needed

Unread post by kellyee21 »

Hello,

Can anyone help me identify this colorful fellow that I found in mid-May at the Pinnacle in Blyde River Canyon (luckily not in my chalet, lol) ? I love his face, looks like the Grinch that stole Christmas !

Image

Image
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Ludwig
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Re: Insect: Grasshoppers and locusts

Unread post by Ludwig »

Hello all,

can someone help me and identify this Lentula.

Is it a

Lentula callani
Lentula minuta
Lentula obtusifrons
Lentula tuberculataelp

foto614100.JPG

foto614070.JPG

foto614069.JPG


I took these pictures in April in Kruger Park near Olifants Camp.

Thank you for your help.

Best regards

Ludwig
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Ludwig
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Re: Insect ID needed.

Unread post by Ludwig »

Hello,

can someone help me and identify this grasshopper?

HP-SA-2014-foto606587.JPG


Seen in May near Mopani in Kruger Park.

Thank you for your help.

Best regards
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Karin Mitton
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Re: Insect ID needed.

Unread post by Karin Mitton »

my insect book has only a handful of the 100s of species you can find in the region.
Closest I can find is nomadacris septemfasciata, (Red locust) - not sure if it is that one, but maybe it is in the nomadacris genus?
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