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Kruger Trees

Find, identify and discuss the plants of all the SANParks
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wildtuinman
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Kruger Trees

Unread post by wildtuinman » Wed Jan 12, 2005 8:29 am

For me, those huge wild fig trees growing on the riverbanks are one of the most beautiful and spectacular ingredients of the Kruger.

The fever tree forest in the Pafuri is also breathtaking!

Does anyone know how old the most southern baobab in the Kruger is? I have also heard that a baobab was found in Mozambique even more south. Has anyone seen it?

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paul
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Unread post by paul » Wed Jan 12, 2005 8:11 pm

Hi wildtuinman

Ive heard that the most southern baobab is 3000yrs old if thats true im not sure. I have to agree with you on the Wild fig trees growing along the rivers(Spectacular :) )

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Unread post by Meg » Sat Mar 05, 2005 9:25 am

Guinea Pig wrote:My favourite part of KNP concerning trees is most definitely the Northern part. That Fever Tree forest is awesome - it has a sense of desolation about it found nowhere else in the Park. When you come from the Transvaal Highveld like me, a baobab tree is really something to admire.


And don't forget all the Mopani trees further south. Such beautiful leaves. Once at Mooiplaas there was a broken bit of branch on the ground at the toilets, but still fresh. I took one of the leaves (naughty) and pressed it inbetween two lens cleaning tissues. It now comes everywhere with me, a nice reminder of the beauty there 8) .
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Unread post by wildtuinman » Fri Mar 11, 2005 6:13 am

Guinea Pig wrote:Are those the trees used by carvers of roadside ornaments in Zim? :? In SA use of the Maroela has lead to problems - said by someone else on the forum.


Leadwoods r very hard and I think therefore tough to carve. The Maroela story is to be found in the latest Wildcard booklet.
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Meg
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Unread post by Meg » Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:17 am

Pilane wrote:
The leadwood tree is also known as the 3000 year tree. It takes 1000 years to reach maturity, 1000 years to die and 1000 years to rot away. Truely amamzing!


And one cubic meter of leadwood weighs in at 1000 kg!


So leadwood has the same weight as water? That is interesting.
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Unread post by Twiga » Fri Mar 11, 2005 11:47 pm

We just heard on our Kruger DVD that a eucalyptus tree uses 150 - 200 litres per day! :shock: They grow in Sabie for purposes of paper and wood and live off the Sabie river. This is one of the reasons why they started the working for water project.
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Ilala palms on H1-3

Unread post by DinkyBird » Fri Sep 16, 2005 10:01 am

Image
Last edited by DinkyBird on Sat Oct 29, 2005 9:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread post by Chris H » Fri Sep 16, 2005 6:45 pm

It is the ilala palm. They start off like this before they grow taller via a slender trunk.

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Unread post by DvZ » Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:24 am

I was once told that this palm tree makes good Beer.

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Unread post by Krokodile » Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:21 pm

You can get a drink similar to Amarula called Ilala Cream. I bought a bottle on my last trip - it has a slightly sour taste in amongst all the creamy yumminess.

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Re: Kruger Trees

Unread post by hfglen » Sat Sep 12, 2009 9:24 pm

Amazing! Looks like we have three of South Africa's six palms in these posts. Guys, there are 2 species of Lala palm in the Kruger Park (see Meg Coates Palgrave's tree book, and Flora Tropical East Africa has nice pictures of the differences). Hyphaene crinita tends to grow low and clumped, and (critical difference) has fruits described by the Kew fundis as "cottage loaf" shaped -- round with a little bolletjie on top. It's common in the southern 3/4 of the Park. Hyphaene petersiana grows tall, and is more common from Shingwidzi northwards; there's a well-known tree in Shingwidzi and another just outside Namutoni at Etosha -- and plenty in northern Botswana too. Its fruits are almost spherical, without the bolletjie. Then there's the exciting one in the first post on palms. This looks to me like it has properly-fan-like leaves, with all the leaflets coming off the same point on the stalk. The swelling 3/4 way up the trunk is characteristic too -- of Borassus aethiopum, which is otherwise only known from near Leydsdorp, and then from Malawi northwards. Congratulations to someone for finding the second South African locality of a most interesting tree!
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Re: Kruger Trees

Unread post by renervr » Tue Sep 15, 2009 6:50 am

Good morning
I can still remember the days were the trees each had a id nr/tag on them and if I recall correct Total still sponsored the maps and on them were the list with the botanical name and the folk name.
Any chance of this being reinstated ?
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Re: Kruger Trees

Unread post by hfglen » Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:46 pm

Thank you, Meandering Mouse. I'll be sure to drop in from time to time.

Renevr: Can't answer for SANParks, but can offer a botanists-eye view of the problem. Unfortunately, scientific knowledge of trees changes (improves?) over time, and so names change, and more plants are found that just scrape it on to the list of trees. As a result, although or maybe because the list you remember has been maintained over the years, it's now a mess (not to put too fine a point on it), and really needs to be scrapped and started again. Not only because we now have to insert names between names that were inserted between names (etc.) with consecutive numbers on the list (what was 147.17 again?), but also because the systematic ideas underlying the sequence of the original list are now known to be, er, suspect. So yes it would be possible to put numbers on trees again (if one could think of a foolproof way of doing so without damaging the tree), but with all due respect to those who want to hang on to the list we have, imho this would really not be a good idea until some fairly basic revision of the list has been done.

That said, there is some good news. I see there is a thread here on DNA bar-coding the KNP trees. One of my research projects involves making an electronic key to 'all the trees in Africa' -- using a list that the bar-coders and I at least talk to each other about occasionally (I don't have formal links with them, through nobody's fault at all). It would be the easiest thing in the world to add numbers to this list when we're reasonably sure it's decently accurate, and probably not far off the second-easiest thing to publish it once we've worked through the issues of what common names, in what languages, what about different concepts of the same species yadda yadda yadda. The obvious advantage of doing so wuld be that if you see a tag numberes 12345 (it could hardly be less than 5 digits) on, say a Cape Chestnut in Addo / Zuurberg, and you recognise the tree, then when you go to Kenya and see another tree labelled 12345, you'll be able to greet an old friend.

Thank you for bearing with this long lecture.
Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana. (Groucho Marx)

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Re: Kruger Trees

Unread post by Meandering Mouse » Sat Oct 03, 2009 5:56 am

Not a long lecture at all hfglen, but very interesting information.

I think that all to often we do not understand enough about DNA coding and the significance. Since developing an interest in trees, I am struck at how difficult it can be to identify a tree.

I have noticed that conservationists are now taking much more note of the impact on the flora than in previous times. An example is Mapungubwe, where elephants are kept away from some of the more vulnerable trees.
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Re: Kruger Trees

Unread post by Imberbe » Sat Oct 03, 2009 11:16 pm

It is also debatable whether you want to have tags on the trees in the parks.

It certainly has the advantage of helping people to identify and get to know more trees. This should be encouraged, since few visitors really appreciate the trees and even less actually know the trees.

But then on the other hand, do you really want a national park to start looking like the N1 highway with boards up on the trees next to the roads? What happened to the "wild" experience?

Maybe preference should be given to tagging trees inside the camps, and at pick nick sites?

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