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Filters & Hoods

Discuss and share your wildlife photography, filming and equipment
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j-ms
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Unread post by j-ms » Wed Sep 28, 2005 5:46 pm

NightOwl wrote:I've read all the info on polarisers and warmers, but what effect will UV Filters have?


1. Protect the front element of your expensive lens.
2. Cause flare in consumer grade lenses :lol: :lol: :lol:

I keep a UV filter "most" of the the time - I tend to remove it photographing into direct light to minimize flare.

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david
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Unread post by david » Thu Sep 29, 2005 8:43 am

If you are wanting to "lighten" a foreground in contrast to a bright background, ala the sunset / rise style pics you can use a graduated ND (Neutral density) filter this is a filter that is half "darkened" and you put the darker half in the area that you want to darken. so in the sunset situation, you would place the darkened area over the sky, which means that the exposure time needed to get the sun right, is longer, and this then exposes the darkened foreground for longer as well, which will then bring out the detail of it. The ND filters have no impact on colours etc, but function purely to darken an area.

The Cokin filter system is very versatile, and can easily be hand held in front of a lens if there are issues with mounting on lenses normally. This site show the effects of a wide range of filters on situations.

and for the digital users... remember that 10 minutes extra setting up the picture can save hours of trying to fix it on the computer....

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DuQues
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Unread post by DuQues » Thu Sep 29, 2005 9:16 am

NightOwl wrote:I've read all the info on polarisers and warmers, but what effect will UV Filters have?

A whole lot of effect you do not wish. Have a read here.
To protect your lens keep your lenshood on at all time.
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david
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Unread post by david » Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:18 am

DuQues wrote:To protect your lens keep your lenshood on at all time.


a lens hood will protect against glare etc, but not physical damage from dust, bashing and continual wiping of lens to clean it..

the slight effects of a UV filter sure do beat having the coating on the lens element damaged and worn away though...
ive had some lenses with the coating done away with and the impact that has isnt too grand

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DuQues
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Unread post by DuQues » Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:25 am

david wrote:a lens hood will protect against glare etc, but not physical damage from dust, bashing and continual wiping of lens to clean it..

It will protect the lens from bashing fairly well, the hood may break, but the lens will still be Okay. Unless you really have a good bang, but then a filter won't help either.
Dust, continual wiping it away? Whatever for?
I hardly ever clean my frontlens. Specs of dust can be found on it, so? You are not going to be able to see them in your photo, not even under large magnification.
Even when you are shooting a foto through trellis, which is rather a lot wider then a speck of dust, you can barely make out the trellis. Only in the background will you see it.
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david
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Unread post by david » Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:43 am

*shrug* maybe you dont have much dust there.

after a trip to kruger, my kit is covered in a layer of dust that if i was to leave on the lens, i would defiitely notice in the images.... could even drop a stop in speed. :)

it comes down to circumstances and personal choice. my call is a UV / skylight filter on all the time. should there be a situation where is not needed / wanted then take it off.

also... the lens hoods on a small prime lens are not exactly large and protective... plenty of scope for damage to occur.

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j-ms
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Unread post by j-ms » Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:49 am

I find a UV filter definitely makes a difference when at the coastal NPs (eg. Tsitsikamma) where you have to protect the front lens element from spray otherwise it will be covered in a layer of salty mist. I am far happier cleaning the salt off the UV filter than I wuld be if I had to get it off the front lens element.

Hard experience has taught me that even if you think it is a clear still day, a salty deposit still develops so I feel much safer leaving a UV filter on.

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Unread post by NightOwl » Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:57 am

jms - do you then just dip the UV in a bucket of water to dissolve the salt off and then let dry? or how do you clean it from the UV filter?

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david
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Unread post by david » Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:57 am

thats true. now that i think of our holidays to the coast.... there is a thick (relatively) film that quickly builds up on the front.... depending on the wind, i am having to clean it 3-4 times per day.

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j-ms
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Unread post by j-ms » Thu Sep 29, 2005 11:20 am

NightOwl wrote:jms - do you then just dip the UV in a bucket of water to dissolve the salt off and then let dry? or how do you clean it from the UV filter?


I just wash the filter in fresh water though I've never dragged a bucket of water around with me :lol: :lol: :lol: .

I also try to keep the lens protected by hanging it pointing downwards. I almost always use a tripod so I hang the tripod over my shoulder with the lens perpindicular to the ground while walking about (similar to a tramp's swag). If I am sitting in one place, I allow the lens to drop down perpincular to the ground or even cover it with a hat or my T-shirt.

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Filters on DSLR

Unread post by Wild@Heart » Fri Nov 04, 2005 8:26 am

Anybody out there that can help me ... I've searched this forum blue and cannot find it ...

There was a discussion on Filters on DSLR that should not be used ...

I just have a question ... is it still necessary to get a filter for a DSLR and if so what Filter?

Sorry DuQues, DB .. I've looked for that topic but could not find it.
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you can use any filter

Unread post by lecter » Fri Nov 04, 2005 8:46 am

one might argue that in post processing, you can do the filtering there. But where you are looking for an exposure or look that you want to capture there and then, in come the filters.

Filters were definately designed in the times where you were carefull about shooting. In these digital times where 1000 shots in a day is normal, filter just become a hassle. Certainly for landscape shots, filters are definately something to be considered, but even then many fine art photogs are not using them, as they are capturing more images and bracketing / merging to get the results required. Film requirements meant filters had more meaning.

I'd like to hear from any one who has a filter that cannot be used. I want to use it.

some of the special filters for starlight effects etc at night are cool.

ND filters for sunsets etc (I have a whole set, used once or twice per the reasons above) are ok.

0.02c worth.

Never be shy to experiment, but do it at a Zoo, in the park, shoot what you know, how you know it. Then you get the results you want... IMO

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Re: Filters on DSLR

Unread post by Meg » Fri Nov 04, 2005 11:21 pm

Wild@Heart wrote:
I just have a question ... is it still necessary to get a filter for a DSLR and if so what Filter?



Undoubtedly you want to get a polarising filter for those lovely blue skies, and for reflections off water. There are many other sorts which you may want for special situations, but in SA the light is great and a polariser will make all the difference regardless of whether you're shooting film or digital. The other popular one to have for when light is low is a UV filter which reduces glare, but is more commonly used to protect your lens. There is a lot of debate over these filters - it could almost be likened to Canon vs Nikon / Microsoft vs Linux, lol. I think most people who can't afford to smash a lens (like me) would rather use one and be safe, as well as take any glare advantage they give. Other, richer photographers (envy here :wink: ) sometimes say that any extra layer of glass in front of the lens (in particular if you buy a cheap filter!) will degrade the image and so don't use them. Personal choice at the end of the day :) .
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DuQues
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Re: Filters on DSLR

Unread post by DuQues » Fri Nov 04, 2005 11:40 pm

Meg wrote:Other, richer photographers (envy here :wink: ) sometimes say that any extra layer of glass in front of the lens (in particular if you buy a cheap filter!) will degrade the image and so don't use them. Personal choice at the end of the day :) .

Totally correct! Never put "bad" glass in front of your expensive glass! Or behind it either, like teleconverters which are especially degrading to the image quality.

Am I rich now?
Not posting much here anymore, but the photo's you can follow here There is plenty there.

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c

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Meg
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Re: Filters on DSLR

Unread post by Meg » Fri Nov 04, 2005 11:47 pm

DuQues wrote:
Am I rich now?


Not all filters are made from "bad" glass :wink:
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