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Snakes

Find, identify & discuss the marine species of SANParks
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Albert
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Unread post by Albert » Mon Jun 12, 2006 4:03 pm

Just to show I wasn't kidding about the sunny side of the termite mounds....
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Searching for a Cape Eagle Owl....

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nunu
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Unread post by nunu » Tue Jun 13, 2006 9:46 am

Wow, cool pic Albert

You've taught me something - I hope that now I'll see more snakes seen as how I now have an extra place to look for them. Is that a MSC? Its looking right at you! :wink:

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mfb
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Unread post by mfb » Fri Jun 16, 2006 6:59 pm

Jumbo wrote:As for snakes killing and eating other snakes: I think they have to be immune against the venom of their prey. They swallow the other snake with its venom and all…? :?


the venom will not affect them unless it enters the bloodstream, so you could drink the venom if you were sure didn;t have any cuts or ulcers etc etc... without a worry

Concerning getting Moz. Cobra spit in the eyes: A lady told me last week that her SO got spit in the eyes. Apparently it was so painful that the doctors had to sedate him for some time till the venom was “neutralized” :shock:


*touch wood* ... never happened to me but I have heard it's extremly painful
The popular argument for destroying rather than protecting snakes is lack of knowledge, and yet there is no valid excuse for this - Austin James Stevens

LinnB
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Camp Snakes?

Unread post by LinnB » Fri Jul 07, 2006 10:21 am

We have been going to the Park for years, and never had any snake experiences (usually went in April and in the winter months)

That all changed when we start going in the summer..

In Mopani we have seen the most snakes, once on the nature path near the dam (moz. spitting cobra right in front of us) and the other time some harmless snake at the toilets by the cafeteria.

The scariest snake adventure was in December 2005 when we stayed in Shimuwini over Christmas, a black mamba was found at the cottage next to us and the staff on duty (camp manager was away for the weekend) was to afraid to move him. Me and my sisters are very, very afraid of snakes and we were to scared to walk around in the camp after that incident, not knowing where the snake is. (Incidently, that was surely the hottest temperatures we have ever experience in the Park, and as you know Shimuwini has only fans...).

Oh yeah, a few years ago when Lower-Sabie still used the old restaurant, i stepped on a snake while walking back to our car after dinner, I made a u-turn in the air :wink:

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TXDrifter
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Unread post by TXDrifter » Mon Jul 10, 2006 1:23 pm

wildtuinman wrote:
luislang wrote:We always go to the park during winter and never have we seen so many snakes as this time!...June. 3 Puffies , a green and a black mamba.


You get green mambas in Kruger?


Not according to this: :hmz:

"The Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) is perhaps the most feared and most notorious snake in southern Africa. Unlike its counterpart, the green mamba, which has never been found in the Park, it is widespread and common throughout the area. Despite the common name this mamba is never black, but generally grayish-brown above with a grayish-white belly. Adults more than four meters long have been recorded, but these were exceptional and a three-meter length is more common."
http://www.krugerpark.com/resources/reptiles/snakes.htm

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wildtuinman
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Unread post by wildtuinman » Tue Jul 11, 2006 7:21 am

I once saw a heck of a long green snake crossing the tar road @ a rate of knots just north of Satara. I assumed it to be a boomslang.
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luislang
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Unread post by luislang » Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:02 pm

Sorry, missed this one.......was very busy with the trees in Cape Town! :lol:

I'm not an expert on snakes and this is interesting to find that Green Mambas are not found in KNP! Never new this. This snake was in a tree and I had a good look at it through the binocs as SO was at the camp.

Went back to the camp shop and paged through a snake book. :redface: It was def not a Boomslang. I remember something about the Boomslang's scales being keeled & not smooth. This one's scles looked smooth to me?

Could it be something else? apart from a BS or Mamba? Or could this be a mamba that emigrated??? I know they are found in Zim.
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Katja
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Unread post by Katja » Wed Jul 12, 2006 10:47 pm

luislang wrote:Could it be something else? apart from a BS or Mamba?

Maybe a Green Water Snake (Philothamnus hoplogaster)?
It is often mistaken for the green mamba.
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wildtuinman
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Unread post by wildtuinman » Thu Jul 13, 2006 8:08 am

luislang wrote: It was def not a Boomslang. I remember something about the Boomslang's scales being keeled & not smooth. This one's scles looked smooth to me?

Could it be something else? apart from a BS or Mamba? Or could this be a mamba that emigrated??? I know they are found in Zim.


The big difference for me between boomslang and green mamba is that the BS has got far bigger eyes.
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bucky
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Unread post by bucky » Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:27 am

Yes , I cant see a huge difference in the scales .
And some boomslangs looked dam smooth to me :lol:

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nunu
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Unread post by nunu » Mon Jul 17, 2006 1:06 pm

Hi Luislang

Perhaps the mistaken green mamba was a Natal Green Snake (Dendrophis natalensis). Quite similar in appearance to a Green Mamba - between 75 and 100 cm in length - bright green. Usually seen between Olifants and Pafuri.

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GJ
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Unread post by GJ » Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:24 am

Hi
In july i had a Black mamba in my tent at Lower sabie tent at the river
i have pic if you would like it?

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Elsa
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Unread post by Elsa » Mon Oct 30, 2006 8:36 am

Hi GJ, and welcome.

A black Mamba in your tent is definitely worth posting a pic,
I am pretty sure it is going to cause many a camper to inspect their tents and sleeping bags more carefully in future tho. :shock: :wink:
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wildtuinman
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Unread post by wildtuinman » Wed Nov 01, 2006 9:51 am

Blackmamba wrote:Has anybody seen / or have pictures of rinkhals in the Kruger, Would luv to hear about it or see the pics.
:D


Hi Blackmamba,

I tried various sites but non of them specify Kruger as a habitat for rinkhals, thus they should not occur there and could be confused with the moz. spitting cobra.

Distribution: From the south-western and southern Cape, northwards over the eastern half of the country, through Orange Free State, Lesotho, Swaziland and Kwazulu-Natal to the Transvaal (south of latitude 25° south); also recorded from the extreme north-eastern part of Zimbabwe (i.e. Inyanga district).


Interesting distrubution on the border of zim and moz though.

Hemachatus is restricted to the eastern regions of South Africa.

From the Southern Cape province , N.E through the Orange Free State, Lesotho, Transkei, Natal, Western Swaziland and parts of Transvaal. An isolated population is centered around Inyanga on the Zimbabwe / Mozambique border.
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nunu
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Unread post by nunu » Wed Nov 01, 2006 1:02 pm

I BM

I have never seen a rinkhals in the Kruger. They Moz SC seems to be the most common of the cobras throughout the park.


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