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Snake: Boomslang/Common African Tree-

Find, identify & discuss the marine species of SANParks
Jumbo

Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread post by Jumbo » Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:59 pm

Okeee agree, that indeed looks like a Boomslang….just for the record, that if a very nice shot you got!!!! 8)

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pepijn
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Chameleon VS Snake

Unread post by pepijn » Sun May 15, 2011 8:40 pm

Hi all.. I filmed this video last Januari in KNP. I wonder if someone can tell me a bit more about the chameleon. Can he survive all the snakebites? He was fighting so brave and even attact the snake. Becouse the chameleon managed to get away I just wonder if he can survive the bites.
thnx.

ross hawkins
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Re: Chameleon VS Snake

Unread post by ross hawkins » Mon May 16, 2011 3:02 pm

Hi Pepijn

Again this is really lucky footage you have here of this occurrence.
This is a juvenile Boomslang attempting to kill n eat a Flap-necked Chameleon.
Chameleons are high up on the menu for Boomslang as this species of snake lives in the trees along with the Chameleon.
The animals chances of survival will depend on if the snake managed to get a good grip and inject venom. The biting you see happening in your clip is the snake actually chewing on the Chameleon, as the fangs on this snake are located right at the back of the jaw and are not the same system say as a mamba or adder.
The Boomslang fangs are grooved to allow venom to flow down the side of the fang into the victim. To get this right it must bite hard and keep chewing to get venom in.

When your clip starts the snake is already attached and biting quite hard, so whether this chameleon will live is hard to say. The venom is a very slow acting venom for us, but for a chameleon it will act quite quickly so maybe this animal was lucky, as it survived to the end of your clip and if you were able to see the Chameleon walk away from under you vehicle then maybe there was a chance for it.

I hope this makes sense

Ross

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pepijn
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Re: Chameleon VS Snake

Unread post by pepijn » Tue May 17, 2011 9:10 pm

Thnx Ross,

but for some reason I just hoped that the chameleon made it... he was soooo brave! :pray:
on the other hand... a snake also has to eat.

Ales
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Location: JHB,Gauteng

Re: Chameleon VS Snake

Unread post by Ales » Fri May 27, 2011 8:27 pm

Very good video!

I can see a spot of blood on the chameleons body(along the stripe) so the boomslang did
get teeth in but it was probably not fangs and I didn't see him get a good bite,so I hope
she did not get venom into the chameleon.
I know they have to eat but would always want the chameleon to get away, boomslang can
rather eat mice and birds.

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Enni
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread post by Enni » Sat Nov 12, 2011 6:59 pm

Hello to the experts,

I have been lucky enough to stay for a few days in Kruger. And more luck: I found this one:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/69728074@N04/

What kind of snake is it?
Greetings from Germany
Next Time Kruger:
27 - 28 Feb Berg En Dal
28 Feb - 02 Mar Satara
02 - 04 Mar Olifants
04 - 06 Mar Skukza
06 - 09 Mar Lower Sabie

10 - 11 Mar Berg en Dal
11 - 13 Olifants
13 - 15 Satara
15 - 17 Skukuza

Ales
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread post by Ales » Sat Nov 12, 2011 10:10 pm

That is a adult male boomslang.
Very nice :)

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BushSnake
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Location: Waar die enigste slang 'n tuinslang is...Joburg

Re: Snake: Boomslang/Common African Tree-

Unread post by BushSnake » Mon Jun 18, 2012 7:59 am

What a video. Thanks for sharing!

I actually doubt that the chameleon made it. Considering that the boomslang has the most potent venom for humans (least amount required to kill you), I can't imagine a chameleon surviving that.

(Hopefully you didn't drive over the fellow... otherwise he definitely wouldn't have made it :) )
"If you can only visit two continents in your lifetime, visit Africa.... TWICE" - R.Elliot

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MPL
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Boomslang

Unread post by MPL » Mon Jun 25, 2012 2:13 pm

Boomslang

Image

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MPL
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread post by MPL » Mon Jun 25, 2012 3:56 pm

Thank you very much Buch Snake.

Here are some head shots. He/She wash a bit quick so the fokus is not as is should be.

Boomslang 2
Image
Boomslang 1

5 of them where taken on 1 trip in May last year. On this trip we had 12 snake spottings. I only manage to take photo's of 5. The one that got away that I'm really sad about where a black snake with white or ivory bands. It was beautiful.

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Mfezi
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Re: Snake: Boomslang/Common African Tree-

Unread post by Mfezi » Tue Jul 02, 2013 8:46 pm

Spotted this Boomslang as it was released after been removed from a building in Berg and Dal camp

Image

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flying cheetah
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Re: Snake: Boomslang/Common African Tree-

Unread post by flying cheetah » Wed Jul 03, 2013 1:30 pm

Wonderful pics of a beautiful snake :clap:
Akukho nyon' endiz' ingahlali phansi. (Zulu)
There is not a bird that flies and never sits down.

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BushSnake
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Location: Waar die enigste slang 'n tuinslang is...Joburg

Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread post by BushSnake » Mon Jul 08, 2013 9:31 am

Birgitta, the harmless green snakes of the genus Philothamnus (Natal green snake, green water snake, and although slightly different also the spotted bush snakes) rarely grow over 1 meter long, but they certainly do occur in Kruger. If a green snake is well over 1 meter, then in all likelihood it is a boomslang. Also, a snake that goes for a chameleon is more likely a boomslang than a green snake or bush snake. The green snakes and bush snakes are not as strong (or venomous) as boomslang, and I think it is unlikely (though never impossible) that they will tackle strong prey like chameleons.

Although most boomslang females are brown (at least up here), there have been confirmed cases of green females as well. Like with most "rules" in nature, there are always exceptions just to keep life interesting :)
"If you can only visit two continents in your lifetime, visit Africa.... TWICE" - R.Elliot

Birgitta
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread post by Birgitta » Wed Jul 10, 2013 8:25 am

This is the snake we saw in late Feb 2006, identified as a boomslang. Not a very good picture taken through the car window. It was not a 2m specimen but about 1m. Great to get to see it.

Image

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Mfezi
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Re: Identification help: Snakes

Unread post by Mfezi » Wed Jul 10, 2013 8:03 pm

Nice pic of that Boomslang Birgitta! :thumbs_up: Sandeep, the Spotted Bushsnake will have clear black narrow bands in the neck area and further back there will be black spots. Then the Spotted Bushsnake's tail / posterior part of the body is a brownish / bronze colour. The one in Birgitta's photo does not have either of these colour markings.


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