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Creepy-crawly phobias

Find, identify & discuss the insects of SANParks
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wildtuinman
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Re: Jumping spiders

Unread post by wildtuinman » Mon Apr 25, 2005 11:30 am

As for spiders: I don't like big ones. Those blokes which is bigger that a daddy long legs. I also don't like venomous ones. A "viool" once bit me on the toe and it was a rietmaraal to not get my toe amputated. It created a hole in my lower leg, on the shin. These marks takes hell long to heel let me tell you that. The hairy ones aren't one of my fav's too as a "bobejaan" was once sitting on my chest licking his paws and tjops when I woke up during the night.

But as far as I know no-one has been killed by a spider in South Africa in the past 50 years. Many people suffered like the current west indian cricket team after been bitten by them though.

Super-spider? I hope I pass that one. :lol:

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Elena
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Unread post by Elena » Mon Apr 25, 2005 1:45 pm

Can one find black widow in SA ?

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Unread post by Johann » Mon Apr 25, 2005 1:56 pm

Oh, definitely Elana. The brown variety is more common but the black widow is still all over. In Gauteng I've always seem to find them in dusty garages.
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Unread post by Guinea Pig » Mon Apr 25, 2005 1:58 pm

We do have a kind of Black Widow but contrary to belief they rarely cause death - only with elderly and children. The bite is extremely painful but treatable. The ones to be scared of in SA is the Violin Spider and the Crab Spider (not sure about the name?).
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Unread post by DuQues » Mon Apr 25, 2005 2:00 pm

Bert's link wrote:Two species are common to the United States.

That set me to thinking that there might be a different one in SA of course, and it is:

Background: Widow spiders belong to the genus Latrodectus and include the black widow spider (Latrodectus mactans mactans) in the United States. The term widow spider is used because not all species in the genus Latrodectus are black. Other widow spiders in North America include the brown widow (Latrodectus geometricus), the red-legged widow (Latrodectus bishopi), Latrodectus variolus, and Latrodectus hesperus. The redback spider (Latrodectus hasselti) is endemic to Australia. Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus and Latrodectus pallidus are found in Europe and South America, and the button spider (Latrodectus indistinctus) is found in South Africa.

The adult female black widow spider is approximately 2 cm in length and shiny black with a red-orange hourglass or spot on the ventral abdomen. The male is much smaller, brown, and incapable of envenomating humans. Juvenile females are also brown but have the general body morphology of the adult. Males and juveniles have a pale hourglass shape, similar to adult females. The female sometimes eats the male during or after copulation. Webs are irregular, low-lying, and commonly seen in garages, barns, outhouses, and foliage. Other widow spiders are generally black but may have red spots, such as Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, or a dorsal red stripe, such as the redback spider. Latrodectus geometricus is brown with red and yellow markings.

Pathophysiology: Alpha-latrotoxin causes the toxic effects observed in humans by opening cation channels (including calcium channels) presynaptically, causing increased release of multiple neurotransmitters. This results in excess stimulation of motor endplates with resultant clinical manifestations. Clinically, the predominant effects are neurological and autonomic, in contrast to the dermonecrotic local effects associated with spiders causing necrotic arachnidism (eg, brown spiders [Loxosceles species]).

Frequency:

In the US: Approximately 2500 widow spider bites were reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) in 2001, although this figure is probably conservative because of underreporting.

Mortality/Morbidity: In the United States, an average of 4 deaths per year are reported to occur as a result of spider bites. However, no deaths caused by widow spider envenomation have been reported to the AAPCC since its first annual report in 1983. A recent death was reported after a black widow spider bite in Greece.
Not posting much here anymore, but the photo's you can follow here There is plenty there.

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c

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Unread post by Guinea Pig » Mon Apr 25, 2005 2:05 pm

Just got this from Vincent Carruthers' Wildlife of Southern Africa:

Black Widows: Neuro-toxin causes severe pain at the site of the bite, muscle disfunction, heart palpitations, stomach ache, difficult breathing, nausea and severe anxiety. If untreated it may lead to death, but it's rare. Get immediate medical aid. Others like the brown one isn't as poisonous.

This is originally in Afrikaans, I hope I got the quick translation right.
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Unread post by craigsa » Wed Nov 23, 2005 4:32 pm

1. Rain Spider
2. Chrsitmas Beetle
3. Centipede
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Unread post by Pilane » Thu Nov 24, 2005 9:19 pm

Although many spiders are not venomous to man they leave a nasty bite wound with serious secondary infection due to dirty mouthparts
Last edited by Pilane on Fri Nov 25, 2005 6:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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bucky
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Unread post by bucky » Fri Nov 25, 2005 11:09 am

Whats up with all the creepy crawlies :o .

These are my worst - red romans ,
they always like to camp under my groundsheet :shock:

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Unread post by Cath » Fri Nov 25, 2005 9:40 pm

Where I lived in Botswana we called these "Kalahari Ferraris" - cos we were in the Kalahari, and they were red, and very very fast. Quite nasty too - sore bite, but no venom. Had the pleasure of one trying to bath with me once.

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Unread post by Meandering Mouse » Sat Dec 10, 2005 10:37 am

I think I must wait for our next Parktown Prawn invasion, the scourge of Northern J'burg.
That can be added to the list of crawling terrorists. Not even my cats want to take them on :shock:
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richardharris
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Some of your worst nightmares!!

Unread post by richardharris » Thu Mar 09, 2006 10:58 pm

OK, not my best photographic efforts - taken a few years ago on a simple digital point and shoot, or via the stills feature of a camcorder.

The first 3 photos are of a very impressive creature - one of the largest insects you are likely to see in the Kruger, only seen in the heat of summer, and one of the most vicious! DON'T put your fingers near this one if you should meet one!

Richard

Image

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bucky
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Unread post by bucky » Fri Mar 10, 2006 11:21 pm

Does anyone know what the second last 1 is actually called .

They seem to be a plague in the park around this time of the year , from satara up to about mopani normally .
They seem to be a sort of flightless grasshopper/locust.

We call them sketzie buggs , duno if this has any scientific basis or not :?:

Some more nastys , erm , interacting :D

Image

Image

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arks
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Unread post by arks » Fri Mar 10, 2006 11:26 pm

Bucky, I posted an old pic of something similar which others IDed as possibly an armoured ground cricket. This looks like the same critter.
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Unread post by Tabs » Sat Mar 11, 2006 12:44 am

I have to admit that I don't understand why anyone should have nightmares about insects or arachnids....even though I have been bitten by a buthidae species of scorpion and by a Praying Mantis!

Insects and arachnids are so interesting that it is worth being bitten by them as long as the bite is not fatal, which it rarely is! They are far more interesting than the Big 5 because there are so many more of them, and their lifestyles are so fascinating and, without them, there would be no Big 5 or, in fact, no human race

The same goes for snakes.... I adore them and enjoy learning more about them - yes, even the venomous ones! - and find it a challenge to take good pics of them, at a reasonably safe distance of course!


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