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Image Stabilizer and Handholding Lenses

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simonb6
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Unread post by simonb6 » Wed Aug 23, 2006 9:37 am

DuQues wrote:There are two versions of the IS 100-400. The older ones indeed have that problem, the newer ones not.

I got my (new) 100-400 last week; breaking the habits of a lifetime, I read the instruction book and it says that IS should turned off if the camera is on a tripod.
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bert
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Unread post by bert » Wed Aug 23, 2006 10:04 am

simonb6 wrote:
DuQues wrote:There are two versions of the IS 100-400. The older ones indeed have that problem, the newer ones not.

I got my (new) 100-400 last week; breaking the habits of a lifetime, I read the instruction book and it says that IS should turned off if the camera is on a tripod.


:redface: :redface:
I will check the instruction books in the future
Otherwise it could cost me my ticket to fame

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Unread post by peterpiper » Sun Oct 14, 2007 8:59 am

Not really much help this, but I once had a 350D and used it with a 70-200 IS lens and was very troubled with 'double images' It appeared to be only that lens and on taking it to Canon, they later decided the IS was faulty and had to be replaced. This in my opnion though, did still not entirely fix the problem, so I moved up a lot to a 5D and and I've not had any more problems since then.
Truthfully though, I never did really understand what the problem was, but try shooting some test images on a tripod using a cable release or the self timer and use a few different lenses. This will tell you if it is the body or lens that is faulty.
It's near impossible to analyze these things from shots taken on a trip, as there are too many variables.
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NightOwl
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Unread post by NightOwl » Sun Oct 14, 2007 3:49 pm

Just remember that the 100-400 has the older version IS.
Canon recommends that you turn IS off when it's on a tripod (Beanbag) or the IS could actually 'introduce' shake.
If you have the stabillity that causes the IS to malfunction, then you actually don't even need the IS, because your set in terms of stabillity. So switch it off when on Beanbag.
The newer IS lenses pick up that it's on a tripod (beanbag) and then switches itself off to prevent introducing shake.

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richardharris
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Unread post by richardharris » Sun Oct 14, 2007 7:43 pm

Couple of comments. The 100-400 is an odd lens. Definitely not as good as the 70-200F4ISL (though longer 'reach') but it is camera dependent. I got some great shots using my original 300D but was never happy when I started the mad upgrade race. The 20D and it were never happy. It therefore went and I got the 300ISL fixed and continue to be very happy with it.

Secondly, IS is perfectly safe on a bean bag. No one can hold a heavy camera and lens perfectly still on a bean bag. The problem only occurs on a tripod (and a solid one at that!) when the camera/lens really is stationary.

Richard

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bert
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Unread post by bert » Mon Oct 15, 2007 1:26 pm

Its a odd lens indeed
i have found that using IS on a good filled beanbag or normal tripod does sometimes create a unsharpness. But thats on the whole image

Ukbadger, your sable are sharp and i think the background is blurred because you did use 5.6.

I dont think there is a problem :?

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Unread post by UKbadger » Mon Oct 15, 2007 7:39 pm

Bert

""Its a odd lens indeed
i have found that using IS on a good filled beanbag or normal tripod does sometimes create a unsharpness. But thats on the whole image.""

I take your point completely, especially about part of the image being sharp.

Blurring of the background we all live with, even go for on purpose, it’s more the “kind” of blurring in this shot that disturbs me. I’m sure I can see a double image in some of my backgrounds. Not quite the same thing as softness of focus.

Here's a closer view.
Image

Maybe removing the filter on the lens as Peter suggested will make a difference, it certainly reduced the amount of flare dramatically. Will be trying it out on the Fallow and Red deer rut here in the UK, so with a bit of luck I’ll know soon.

Thanks for your suggestions.

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bucky
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Unread post by bucky » Tue Oct 16, 2007 9:00 am

The last shot illustrates pixilation and artifacting in the background , and its a digital thing .

did you shoot raw or jpeg ?

This effect is very often due to processing methods etc also , and when you sharpen in ps etc .

What sort of workflow do you use ?

I only use a uv filter at the beach to prevent salt spray on my lens surfaces .

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Re: Big lense for Canon 450D

Unread post by EOS_User » Fri Feb 04, 2011 11:22 am

Hi harrys;

Let us know what you finally decided on, and, as DuQues says, post up some results from your trip!

Something for you to think about if you're not used to using Image Stabilised lenses; like the 100-400... (If you are, then just ignore me - but hopefully others might find it useful...)

IS lenses generally have 2 active settings;
- Position 1 - is normally used for shooting still objects and the gyros will stabilise both horizontal & vertical movement...
- Position 2 - is normally used for shooting moving objects when you'll be panning; such as Birds-in-Flight or moving/running wildlife. In this position the vertical stabiliser is turned off; so the lens isn't fighting your movement...

But, don't be afraid to turn IS OFF all together. If the light is good enough to obtain a high enough shutter-speed, you shouldn't normally need IS anyway! (IS should also be turned OFF if using mounted on a tripod; the reason for that is for another day...). Apart from that, the IS sometimes slows down the AF when you most need it!

Longer lenses like the 100-400 also typically have AF distance limiters. The default for the 100-400 is 1.8m, but for use in KNP, I would have it generally set it to max (6.5m) to help reduce the amount of 'hunting' the AF needs to do... Again, you'll need to remember to switch it back to the default for shooting any close-up objects.

HTH

Good luck & have fun...

Cheers...

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IS - Image Stabilisers?

Unread post by firefinch » Wed Aug 31, 2011 4:18 pm

Hi All,

I wanted to get some opinions on using IS.

Do you use it and when do you use it?

I read in a recent article that for birding photography when you are shooting at high shutter speeds it is better to not use IS at all. Rather to use IS in low light conditions when shutter speeds are slow and you are photographing stationary subjects.

I have a canon 100-400mm lens and have been taking all my photos with IS on (mode 1). But now Im rethinking leaving it off for my birding shots.

thanks

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Re: IS - Image Stabilisers?

Unread post by EOS_User » Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:07 am

Hello FireFinch;

I too use the 100-400 (and other IS lenses) and have IS turned OFF most of the time! My given theory FWIW is that I don't turn IS ON unless it is 'required'. Most of the time it's not! IS is a solution to a potential problem (low light / low speed). If the problem doesn't exist - why use it, when doing so 'could' generate it's own problems...

E.g; For birds & other fast-moving subjects, the theory is that turning IS OFF improves the AF tracking speed of the lens. The camera's AF system is not fighting the lens' IS system, and is putting all it's power into doing the AF job.

HTH...

Cheers...

PS: Using Mode1 for moving objects is also the wrong mode anyway. S/be Mode 2 for use when panning. Mode 1 s/be used for static subjects; Mode 2 for moving subjects. Also; if you're using a tripod - always turn IS OFF anyway; again so it doesn't 'think' that it needs to be working! That's my theory at least :D


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