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Raven, White-necked

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa
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Bush Baptist
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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread postby Bush Baptist » Wed Jul 10, 2013 8:56 pm

Sorry about the lousy pic - the only one.

It was soaring above the Bontebok NP on Saturday.

Not a jackal buzzard, and it doesn't look like a Verreaux's to me. Not a black harrier. I am running out of options.


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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread postby MattAxel » Wed Jul 10, 2013 9:33 pm

Just looking at the picture on my phone, but just from the shape I get the feel of a White-necked Raven.

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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread postby DotDan » Thu Jul 11, 2013 7:34 am

Agreed :thumbs_up:

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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread postby Bush Baptist » Thu Jul 11, 2013 8:14 am

Aha! thanks guys, I never thought of that!
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Raven, White-necked

Unread postby Johan van Rensburg » Thu Aug 01, 2013 3:36 pm

The White-necked Raven, Corvus albicollis, is the biggest member of the South African crow family. They are very similar in size to a yellow-billed kite and can easily displace some of the smaller raptors at a kill, especially when they team up to do so. I have seen their “King-of-the-Castle” behaviour and tactics at a number of vulture feeding sites, but I have recently come to the conclusion that their bark is much worse than their bite. They seasonally adopt vulture restaurants as their "Castle" and they defend it against bigger scavengers. Where they feature, the Bearded Vulture in particular seems to have become a "victim" of this game of "King of the Castle"! The vulture restaurants in and around the Drakensberg were envisaged to be the solution needed for the survival of the endangered Bearded Vulture. Nobody could have foreseen the raven twist. Legend has it that they can attach themselves to the backs of bigger birds from where they attack the bird's neck and head until the bird loses coordination and crashes!

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Quite recently I got feedback from Sonja Krueger, the KZN Bearded Vulture guru. She refutes this bit of bush lore, saying that the story is far-fetched. The ravens' reputation has been unjustly tarnished by uninformed observers at the vulture feeding sites. The ravens will not do much more than pull at the tail feathers of big birds at the feeding site or in flight. Their presence at these feeding sites is seasonal and often depends of the type of food available; at certain times they will all but disappear. When necessary, vultures can more than hold their own in a confrontation with the ravens.

The raven favours escarpments, rocky cliffs and mountainous regions, nesting and roosting on cliffs. They are highly intelligent and adaptable feeders, eating nearly anything that is edible, preying mainly on rodents and large insects although it will also act as a scavenger, often targeting road kills. It has been seen picking up tortoises that they drop from heights of about 15 metres onto rocks to crack open the shell so that they can eat the juicy insides.

Average lifespan is 20 years, but birds can live up to 40.

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Ravens tend to stay in pairs. They "play" tag games with a bone or a stick for hours on end, honing their flying skills.
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Re: Raven, White-necked

Unread postby hilda » Fri Sep 06, 2013 6:12 am

Johan van Rensburg wrote:She refutes this bit of bush lore, saying that the story is far-fetched. The ravens' reputation has been unjustly tarnished by uninformed observers at the vulture feeding sites.


I'm so glad Sonja Krueger has cleared this up! People don't seem to be fond of Ravens anyway, and stories like this can only harm these poor birds' reputation further, whilst they are so big and beautiful! :D
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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread postby arks » Sun Mar 08, 2015 4:13 am

I'm very puzzled by this bird, not even entirely sure that it is actually a raptor :hmz: It seems to have something in its beak ... and it seems to be overall dark with white on its neck, so it might even possibly be a whitenecked raven? I'm stumped! :wall: I saw it along the Olifantsbos road at Cape Point in late November 2014.

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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread postby Karin Mitton » Mon Mar 09, 2015 7:58 am

arks wrote:I'm very puzzled by this bird, not even entirely sure that it is actually a raptor :hmz: It seems to have something in its beak ... and it seems to be overall dark with white on its neck, so it might even possibly be a whitenecked raven? I'm stumped! :wall: I saw it along the Olifantsbos road at Cape Point in late November 2014.


Arks, I have found that I underestimate the size of raven's, and often when I spot a soaring raven at a distance, I think it may be a raptor. Then they open their mouths to call each other, and I realize my mistake. Very devious if them to confuse us like that!

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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread postby arks » Fri Mar 13, 2015 2:48 pm

Thanks Karin, agree they're confusing and I certainly never heard this one call as it appears to have something in its mouth. So I'm still not sure what it might be ... Does anyone else have any ideas? :pray:
Karin Mitton wrote:Arks, I have found that I underestimate the size of raven's, and often when I spot a soaring raven at a distance, I think it may be a raptor. Then they open their mouths to call each other, and I realize my mistake. Very devious if them to confuse us like that!
arks wrote:I'm very puzzled by this bird, not even entirely sure that it is actually a raptor :hmz: It seems to have something in its beak ... and it seems to be overall dark with white on its neck, so it might even possibly be a whitenecked raven? I'm stumped! :wall: I saw it along the Olifantsbos road at Cape Point in late November 2014.

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30 June-8 July National Arts Festival, Grahamstown
8-15 July Mountain Zebra
16-22 July Cape Town
* * *
16-28 November Cape Town
29 November-20 January Darling

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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread postby wildtuinman » Thu Apr 09, 2015 8:43 am

arks wrote:Thanks Karin, agree they're confusing and I certainly never heard this one call as it appears to have something in its mouth. So I'm still not sure what it might be ... Does anyone else have any ideas? :pray:
Karin Mitton wrote:Arks, I have found that I underestimate the size of raven's, and often when I spot a soaring raven at a distance, I think it may be a raptor. Then they open their mouths to call each other, and I realize my mistake. Very devious if them to confuse us like that!
arks wrote:I'm very puzzled by this bird, not even entirely sure that it is actually a raptor :hmz: It seems to have something in its beak ... and it seems to be overall dark with white on its neck, so it might even possibly be a whitenecked raven? I'm stumped! :wall: I saw it along the Olifantsbos road at Cape Point in late November 2014.

Image



Surely this is a crow carrying off some scraps to go eat elsewhere.
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