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Kite: Yellow billed

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa
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Loams
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Unread post by Loams » Thu Mar 08, 2007 8:59 am

We have many YBK's in Gabs

I was wondering:

Why do they do so well in and around human settlements? I see at least 5 every day on my 10km commute to work...

How can I attract them to my garden? Do they roost in specific trees with specific heights/density etc etc??

Any ideas?
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Snoobab
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Unread post by Snoobab » Thu Mar 08, 2007 9:23 am

Hi ya Loams
YBK's are very good at scavanging and eating almost anything they can get their hands on. That is why they do well in human areas. They also adapt very well and become used to humans and lose their fear of us.
They normally roost in communal groups in big trees.
Attracting them to your garden might prove a bit tricky unless you are able to erect a rather high (at first) feeding platform with scraps on it. Once they become aware of the regular food source and see there is no danger associated with it they should become a bit more tame and your feeding platforms can be lowered. (roof tops at first are good places)

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wildtuinman
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Unread post by wildtuinman » Thu Mar 08, 2007 9:34 am

Here in PTA, they prefer blue gum trees.

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Bush Baptist
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Unread post by Bush Baptist » Thu Mar 08, 2007 6:36 pm

wildtuinman wrote:Here in PTA, they prefer blue gum trees.


Same here in Cape Town
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Loams
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Unread post by Loams » Fri Feb 08, 2008 3:16 pm

Saw something really interesting the other day... I saw YBK's flying together, almost like a flock, but in very loose formation almost as if they migrating. Its too early though, and I still see a lot of them in town.

My only conclusion is that the YBK's that I saw are from somewhere in SA where the weather patterns are a bit stuffed, and that the Gaborone YBK's are not interested in leaving yet.

Any comments?
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Unread post by wingman » Fri Feb 08, 2008 5:05 pm

There were few YBK that frequented the N,wanetsi picnic spot that were very good at borrowing off the braai's even when at full heat so if you are in that area its not only your beer you need to watch.

i dont know if the same birds return to the same area but I assume so as a neighbour we had in Amanzimtoti used to feed the YBK chicken legs by throwing them up to them when he had a braai, they soon got to know and would circle 6 to 8 meters above waiting for their tit bit when ever his braai came out this happened for a few years in a row.

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Bush Baptist
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Unread post by Bush Baptist » Fri Feb 08, 2008 7:52 pm

Loams wrote:Saw something really interesting the other day... I saw YBK's flying together, almost like a flock, but in very loose formation almost as if they migrating. Its too early though, and I still see a lot of them in town. Any comments?
YES! About 28 Dec 2005 we were travelling from Sehithwa? to Shakawe (on the western bank of the Ok) and saw two such occurrences, about 50 birds each time, circling around. It was threatening to rain. Why?
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Jay
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Unread post by Jay » Fri Feb 08, 2008 8:47 pm

Bush Baptist wrote:
Loams wrote:Saw something really interesting the other day... I saw YBK's flying together, almost like a flock, but in very loose formation almost as if they migrating. Its too early though, and I still see a lot of them in town. Any comments?
YES! About 28 Dec 2005 we were travelling from Sehithwa? to Shakawe (on the western bank of the Ok) and saw two such occurrences, about 50 birds each time, circling around. It was threatening to rain. Why?


See it here frequently, last time was Saterday last week...and sometimes this is with a flock of Grey-headed Gulls...usually above areas of the wheatfields.

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anne-marie
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Yellow billed Kite

Unread post by anne-marie » Fri Apr 18, 2008 9:55 pm

4. Image near Shimuwini
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Unread post by Jock » Wed Jun 25, 2008 5:33 pm

We saw hundred of YBK's in Feb and we managed to get a nice pic of this one

Image Larger view
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Mgoddard
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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread post by Mgoddard » Mon Jan 19, 2009 4:55 pm

deefstes wrote:Is this one bird or two birds? Either way, it looks like the same species. But I'm not going to tell you just yet :twisted: I'll leave it to you to at least narrow it down a bit more. You're guessing that it could be "another Steppe", based on what? The fact that it's brown?

Sure,your bird is brown and it's obviously a big raptor. There aren't really that many brown birds of prey and they pretty much come from only two families (broadly speaking), Eagles and Buzzards. So first tell me, do you think your bird is an Eagle or a Buzzard? Why?



First of all I thought by making a link you get a bigger picture of the bird..but will now embed them in my post.

Image


Deefstes lets see why I get so confused and why I question the ID’s

Bird No. 1 above: Yellow Billed Kite or Tawny Eagle??

I see an all yellow bill – not Tawny
The gape reaches below the eye – seen in Tawny
I can also see some spots on the back – Not shown in my Sasol for either Tawny or Yellow Billed Kite
The tail looks short and not deeply forked as explained for YB Kite

Also because of the all yellow bill it cant be:
Steppe Eagle
Walhberg’s Eagle or
Steppe Buzzard

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deefstes
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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread post by deefstes » Mon Jan 19, 2009 10:39 pm

Nice going Mgoddard, your ID process looks good. :thumbs_up:

Bird 1:
Yes, it is indeed a Yellow-billed Kite. The all yellow bill is the dead giveaway. Some birds, but notably raptors have, what is called a cere or operculum, around the nostrils. This is the fleshy area that you see at the base of the bill. With most raptors this cere is yellow or sometimes red and in few cases grey. Yellow-billed Kite is the only bird in our region of which not only the cere but also the bill is yellow so, while the rest of your observations were accurate, they were not even neccessary.

The amount by which the tail is forked can vary but your bird still shows somewhat of a fork, something you wouldn't have seen on Tawny Eagle, Steppe Eagle Walhberg’s Eagle or Steppe Buzzard.
"Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals ... except the weasel." -Homer Simpson

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Mgoddard
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Re: Kite: Yellow billed

Unread post by Mgoddard » Fri Jan 23, 2009 8:29 am

madach that is an awesome picture :clap:

Here is mine of the Yellow Billed Kite seen in January

Image

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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread post by Cherries » Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:23 pm

I don't have enough experience of identing raptors in flight but SO keeps taking photos. Problem is they always have to be cropped to the extreme. Your help with these UFO's would be great. :pray:

Bird 1 - pic A
Image
pic B
Image

Bird 2
Image

Area - Golden Gate to Sterkfontein Dam, Feb 09

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Johan van Rensburg
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Re: Identification Help - Raptors

Unread post by Johan van Rensburg » Thu Feb 12, 2009 9:02 am

Yellow-billed kite. The "lumping" of Milvus migrans and M. aegyptius makes this a relatively easy ID based on the classic kite tail shown here. However, if you want to split feathers, it becomes trickier... then I cannot help further with the visual information available.
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