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Quelea, Red-billed

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa
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fevertree
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Quelea, Red-billed

Unread post by fevertree » Fri Nov 04, 2005 11:07 am

According to the book, "The Kruger Experience", it is estimated that there are over 41 million birds in the Kruger National park in summer when all the migrants are here!!
And even more stunning than this, over 50% of the biomass of KNP birds is made up by the Red-billed Quelea!!
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bert
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Re: Amazing bird numbers

Unread post by bert » Sat Nov 05, 2005 4:07 pm

fevertree wrote:And even more stunning than this, over 50% of the biomass of KNP birds is made up by the redbilled quelea!!


And why havent i seen not one of them.
Summerresident?

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Unread post by DinkyBird » Sat Nov 05, 2005 10:12 pm

I have seen them on quite a few occasions. Wonderful sight. Huge flocks that move as one. But I am sure it has been during winter months.

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lam
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Re: Amazing bird numbers

Unread post by lam » Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:43 am

bert wrote:And why havent i seen not one of them.
Summerresident?


The seem to breed very quickly in large numbers at different times of the year. Last year there were millions of them at Lake Ngami in Botswana.

Kenya Birds wrote:Kenya: Abundant throughout the country.

Found in bush, grassland, cultivation and savannah this is one of Kenya's most studied birds. It is, to put it bluntly, the greatest avian agricultural pest in the whole of the Afrotropical region. Being highly gregarious as well as nomadic, flocks containing hundreds of thousands and sometimes even millions of individuals can devastate cereal crops. They roost in such massive numbers that they can break thick tree branches. Being in an area where they are massing in numbers is a remarkable experience (unless you're a cereal farmer). At first light the flocks leave their roost to go for water and from a distance it looks as though a grass fire has started. The Queleas form into dense, highly synchronised flocks which look like clouds of smoke, and then, as the flock approaches you, the numbers are so vast their wing-beats sound like a high wind. We have been fortunate enough to witness this spectacle at Amboseli where we sat for 10 minutes while a single flock of Queleas made their morning trip from the swamp to the grassland to feed.
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Unread post by Ollie » Mon Nov 07, 2005 4:21 am

When can you see them in the park in such numbers? Only in Summer, If so up until when? and where is the best place to see this spectacle? :?:

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Unread post by wildtuinman » Mon Nov 07, 2005 6:14 am

Anytime. I saw a flock in early winter this year next to my home in PTA. See them fairly often in Mpumalanga areas.
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Unread post by arks » Fri Nov 03, 2006 5:03 am

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Unread post by elpaco » Fri Oct 19, 2007 12:28 pm

what about this one ?

female Village Indigobird ?

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Unread post by deefstes » Fri Oct 19, 2007 2:30 pm

elpaco wrote:what about this one ?

female Village Indigobird ?


Not with that monster beak. Rather a non-breeding male Red-billed Quelea.
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Unread post by adw » Fri Feb 15, 2008 2:49 pm

hi Ollie,
the last week in January this year I stayed at Satara. One of my favourite roads was the S90 and between 5 to 10 kms south of the Bangu waterhole I literally came across thousands and thousands of the red billed quelas. Not only that but there were numerous steppe buzzards, Wahlberg eagles, yellow-billed kites and hundreds of Marabou storks all enjoying the feast.
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Unread post by Wild about cats » Sat Feb 16, 2008 10:11 am

My mom was on the birding weekend and she saw marabou storks eating the hatchlings from the nests and they counted over 400 Tawny Eagles.

Are these the birds that have been appearing at the Satcam?
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Unread post by Johann » Fri Jun 20, 2008 12:59 pm

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Re: Quelea, Red-billed

Unread post by DinkyBird » Sat Mar 28, 2009 6:14 pm

Kruger, March 2009
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Re: Quelea, Red-billed

Unread post by expat » Thu Jun 18, 2009 4:44 pm

I am not a "twitcher" yet, but am trying hard! :redface: Please can someone tell me if the Quelea belong to the finch family. They are not on the KTP sightings guide and yet we seemed to see so many of them at waterholes last September, if they were indeed Quelea. Coming again to KTP in March 2010 and need to start my "twitch" swotting! :thumbs_up:
expat

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Re: Quelea, Red-billed

Unread post by Lizet Grobbelaar » Thu Jun 18, 2009 5:46 pm

expat,
Queleas have been recorded in KTP, they do migrate seasonally after good rains, but normally absent from the area. We are regular visitors to the Park and normally see large flocks of Redheaded finches(could be your "Quelea"?) Sparrows, Scaly-feathered finches and canaries.


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