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Photography Tips

Discuss and share your wildlife photography, filming and equipment
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kesheshe
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Re: Some advice needed for a Beginner Photographer

Unread post by kesheshe » Tue Nov 27, 2012 4:29 pm

i do not know how long your trips are but be careful on memory.

32GB memory card
8GB memory card

i would then suggest you take a laptop with external hardrive to increase capacity.

i know there are many users who will tell you not to fit filters so it is your choice. Just be carry in KTP regarding keeping stuff clean and as has been said to not change lenses unless you really need to.

In KTP try playing with the EV for raptors.

i agree with you on macro it takes a macro lense with duel flash to get really amazing results that is not to say you cannot get good shoots with what you have. At least f11 and iso 100 if you can get away with it.

i am not a great fan of converters but it maybe a option to increase length - i am not a nikon user but i think around 1.4. It will more than likely though take you to manual focus.

Go have fun and practice lots!
2011 September KTP - 17 days

I am against hotels in KNP

EOS_User
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Location: A grey UK ! Longing to be in SA !

Re: Some advice needed for a Beginner Photographer

Unread post by EOS_User » Tue Nov 27, 2012 8:39 pm

fee wrote:Read this with interest.
I will be purchasing a canon 600d which comes with 2 x standard lenses as well.
I am looking to buy a better "long distance" lens and have been told to get the Canon 18-200mm lens.
Is the 150-500mm lens a lot more expensive or is the 18-200mm sufficient for me at this stage.
I have someone coming from US and they are able to buy it for me - presume its a lot cheaper in US than here.


fee;

If the 600D is coming kitted with two lenses, they will almost certainly be the 18-55 & 55-250, in which case the 18-200 will simply be duplicating what you'll already have.

I strongly suggest getting to grips with the kit you'll be getting first before you start to swap-out or upgrade that range of lens...

You will though need a much longer reach than the 55-250 can give you and so the Sigma 150-500 is a decent 'budget' option, but it's drawback is that it is slow at the long-end, and in poor light will suffer.

The 600D is a 18Mp unit, so there's plenty of room to crop images and still get a good print. If you can run to it, the Canon 'lens of choice' for Kruger (et al) is the 100-400. More expensive than the Siggy, but much better quality IMO.

HTH...

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timbo
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Re: Some advice needed for a Beginner Photographer

Unread post by timbo » Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:16 pm

Agree with EOS. Get to grips with the camera and lenses you are buying before considering buying a new lens, the 18-200 if i'm not mistaken is close to 6k in most stores which is already half way to purchasing the 150-500 sigma which comes out at 11.5k and the canon 100-400 (my personal choice) which comes out at around 14K.

Do some shopping around, you might be able to find it cheaper somewhere.

Tip
Always know what you are receiving and what you want from the camera you are purchasing before considering a new lens choice, sit and talk to people who know, send emails to photographers, they may help you and give you advice. Dont rush decisions as you may feel that it was the incorrect decision after a while and once you have made the decision stick with it. This is an expensive hobby/career and you dont want to make mistakes.

And always do some shopping around before hand
I try my best and that's what matters I hope.

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leo21
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Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by leo21 » Mon Feb 02, 2015 12:59 pm

hi Forumiets :cam: :cam: :cam:

so being a amature photographer and enthusiast i was playing with some of my photos last nite.
after scrolling thru all my photos and thinking the next one is better then the last i was wondering.....

what is the unwritten rules of wildlife photography
what editing tips and advise do you have
and what in your eyes are the rules and guidelines leading up to the perfect shot

love to hear all of your opions and adives :thumbs_up:

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BrawlerO
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by BrawlerO » Mon Feb 02, 2015 1:16 pm

My top 3 tips would be:

1) Shoot in RAW format (for maximum editing options)
2) Shoot the light (golden hours etc)
3) Shoot the eyes (get in close, fill the frame)

But there are so many and it depends on what you are after personally...:-)

Happy :cam:
International Visitor from the UK

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leo21
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by leo21 » Tue Feb 03, 2015 2:50 pm

hi Brawler

thank you for your input!


if no golden light and u see an amazing sighting in early morning or maybe afternoon when the sun is high?
what then

also whats your opinion on Black and white photos?

to me all my photos look beter when black and white

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BrawlerO
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by BrawlerO » Tue Feb 03, 2015 4:58 pm

Depends what you are after- once I delete all my junk photos from any session (out of focus, bad composition etc) the ones I am left with fall into two categories: a)good 'photos' and b)memories/recordings of a moment
Ideally it is both but not as often as I would like :-)

I've recorded some great 'memories' in poor light that while they will never be great photos still make me happy when I look back at them. So I would say shoot away all day but be realistic with your expectations of the results. And look, photo editing software is getting so good these days that who knows how you might be able to improve them in the future (hence shooting in RAW format). But I still believe the ones that are great first time always stand out.

To your second point, I think Black and White is actually a great way of making a mediocre shot into a very nice one. I use it all the time! But shoot normally (ie not B&W in the camera) and then process yourself to get the look you want. What software do you use?

And remember, we get better by practice and photography is an area where you can learn something everyday. I take encouragement from previous failures knowing I am improving! :-)
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PRWIN
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by PRWIN » Tue May 05, 2015 8:58 am

leo21 wrote:This is one of my most recent photos. B&W of course
Image


Leo21 I,m going to throw something at you and say there is no perfect shot as each person has there own view for the perfect shot.
what I can do is give you a bit of advice on the above photo lovely photo by the way 1) Me I would have given it a bit more space in front and to the right to allow the animal to move into it , also would have tried to cut out the guy in the back top right or included him completely. Remember the concept of thirds in a photo. 2) always try and get to eye level with the subject or lower. 3) What I will advice is shoot in raw or at the biggest jpeg file your camera will allow.

Any photo is a good photo as long as it is sharp where it needs to be. AS for shooting in the golden light ,this does not normally work as the subjects are not at your command, you take them as you see them, so if you can shoot when they in the shade , this help's in the heat of the day.

Always try to have the sun behind you till +/_ 90 degrees to you.

Now saying the above I,m going to say all the rules you hear and read what people say are meant to be broken :lol: :lol: :lol: Think and shoot out the box, If you see something you like shoot it, no mater the time or where the sun is for eg the photo below taken full into the sun.

1st one rule of the third applied sort off and the 2nd :hmz: :hmz: , It is up to the photographer , you like it or you don't

I made it a bit warmer

Image

Made it a bit cooler

Image

The sky is the limit on how you do post processing.

To me it comes down to how you process the photo, getting the shot is to me 50% of the photo, the rest is how you present it which will and could make that shot great or not

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leo21
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by leo21 » Tue May 05, 2015 9:15 am

Lovley adivse PRWIN, i am still a new to Photography.....
so that being said...

please explain to me what you mean by more space in front, do you mean you would have not cropped so close to there feet??

and also whats the concept of thirds in a photo?

hope you can take the time to talk me thru as i really want to improve and learn?

also if you shoot in RAW does it take up more space on your memory card, as id hate to run out of space when in the kruger and nowhere to off load and format.
:cam:

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PRWIN
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by PRWIN » Tue May 05, 2015 9:48 am

Yes that is what I mean, would not have cropped so close to the feet and also the above, but it always has to do in what is a distraction in the shot ( Distraction is something that will pull your eye away from the subject you want people to see and is not party of the photo), but that is my pref, each person to themselves :) .As for the concept of thirds. That is you have to place the subject to the side of the photo and not dead center in the photo. You divide the photo into 9 blocks, keeping the subject out of the center block. It works sometimes and then again it does not.

As for Raw, that is the way to go, but here is a warning, if you cannot do post processing stay away from it as no program will read that format until it has been converted to jpeg or tiff, when I say program I mean only editing programs are able to read a raw file .A Raw file can take up a lot of space on the disk , mine normally run around 27 to 32mb per photo, but that is what you want as you get all the info , so if you make a mistake you can correct it in PS more easily than if it was a low jpeg file

A Raw file has nothing added to it, no conversion, no down sizing, it is the max size the camera can take, normally a camera will adjust your light ,contrast, saturation, sharpness and color balance according to how it is set up on camera. Raw all this is removed and you have to do it all in post processing.

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leo21
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by leo21 » Tue May 05, 2015 4:27 pm

Ooohhh i always had this idea to utilize all space an crop as much as u can. Now i know better. Can i ask ur opinion on 3 other photos pllllllzImageImage8Image


U may be brutally honest :)

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PRWIN
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by PRWIN » Tue May 05, 2015 4:57 pm

Leo21 I don't like doing it as each person to there own style .Now remember this is how I would have liked it, this can and will change from person to person, each to there own pref

No1) B/W -lovely action and as is I like, only problem is the dog top left include or if possible remove as that is a distraction. Also not sharp. a sharp photo will always get your attention. This is one medium that I really love to play in as well. A good B/w will have different shades of blacks and white in it

Image

As you see this is a tight crop, It goes to what you want the person attention to see, Here I wanted them to focus on the head and trunk, also the action. Like I say each to there own . It is hard to say this or that. PS not as sharp as it should be as I just down sized it with out re sharpening it

No2) totally too tight a crop for me, I would add more space at feet ,top and behind bird. space in front of bird slightly bit more

No3) lovely shot, some people will say to cut +- 2cm from top at trees making it slightly more rectangle, me I like it , only problem not sharp, color great and set up :clap: :clap:

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leo21
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by leo21 » Tue May 05, 2015 6:49 pm

Thank u for ur opion i wil def work on it.... if a photo is not sharp there is no real way of fixing it ? Right? Also i never really focused on distractions in the back ground as u pointed out in two of my photos. This is something il def work on

Thank u for taking the time :)

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PRWIN
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by PRWIN » Wed May 06, 2015 8:54 am

Leo21 Here is something to look at. All are the same photo, just showing different ways to get around obstacles and also preference :)

Image

1st photo as taken well almost, Cheetah was dead center so I cropped using the aspect of the third. Divide the photo into 9 blocks and keep the subject out the center or as close to the center but not directly in it. Not my type of photo ,but some people like it as they want to see the animal in its natural surroundings.

Distraction in this photo is the branch on the Left and grass in front, distracts from allowing your eye to go to the subject easily

Image

same photo rotated. Distraction of grass still present , but not as bad, now a major distraction is the branch on the right, keeps pulling one's eye away from the subject, also the subject wanting to fall over :hmz: some will say it's turning :lol: :lol:

Image

The type I like to take, I want to see the subject. Notice the distraction has been removed and also the grass in front of subject is not that relevant as it was in the previous photo's. Also the rule of the third applies in that the subjects head is not dead center

Remember there are no rules, the rules are what certain people prefer and then try and get you to shoot in those confinements, are they rules. I have seen a lot of blogs where people say do this and that , but when it comes to the crunch and photo are entered into competitions, did they practice what they preached??? :hmz: . It always comes back to what the judges/viewers are looking for and what they perceive as the perfect shoot.

So what do you do???

Be happy and just enjoy taking photo's and develop a style that you like and are comfortable with :) and if people like or don't , so be it :hmz:

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leo21
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Re: Unwritten rules to photography

Unread post by leo21 » Wed May 06, 2015 11:33 am

that was very insightfull PRWIN, i will actually try these with my own... i was so dead set on the idea of a subject being dead centre but i can see that what you just showed me gives the photo so much more caracter :think:

i always like getting a second opinion on my photos and dont mind the criticism when it is contructive.

you have been nothing but fair with your "criticism" :clap: and i learnt a few thing that i will try and add into my photos.

i have set my Camera to "RAW" and wil try this out first before we go to the Kruger in December. Gives me plenty time to learn and play around with the settings


how does one get use to Manual focus? i know this is a totally diff topic not but it its one aspect i still greatly struggle with


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