Tree: Sycamore Fig / Common Cluster Fig (Ficus sycomorus)

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craigsa
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Tree: Sycamore Fig / Common Cluster Fig (Ficus sycomorus)

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Hi All

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Stephen
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Sycamore Fig / Common Cluster Fig (Ficus sycomorus)

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The Sycamore Fig / Common Cluster Fig (Ficus sycomorus) close the usually dry Vurhami river bed on the H5 close to the Gomondwane Windmill. An exceptional example of this fig species. I have seen and heard of regular sightings of leopard on the “comfortable” branches of that tree as well, and for the bird lovers - the fruit that is on the tree for most of the year (up to four crops annually) attracts a whole range of birds to come and feast.
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arks
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Sycamore fig

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Here's my next batch of KNP mystery plants:

4.
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Thanks!!
Last edited by arks on Sat Feb 23, 2008 7:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Imberbe
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4. Ficus sycomorus (Trosvy, Sycamore fig, Cluster fig) Often found next to rivers. Prolific in fruit production and popular amongst birds, mammals etc.
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Vonnie
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Unread post by Vonnie »

Can humans eat the fruit of this tree? :hmz:
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Imberbe
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Unread post by Imberbe »

Yes, but is usually infested by insects. Especially the little wasp that pollinate them.
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And those irritating insects that bite you
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Unread post by bucky »

Sure looks like 1 of the ficus species , but I will go with Ficus burkei - common wild fig , seen as it does not look to be near a river , unless its next to the timbavati , in which case it could also be a ficus sycamorus.

Common wild fig - Grows in wooded grassland , woodland ,ravines and on the edge of forests .
Evergreen up to 15m tall with a rounded to spreading dense crown .

Interesting this is , it grows from small , next to another tree , using that for support and protection, eventually overtaking and killing the first tree .
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Ficus sycomorus ? (fruits)

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Ficus sycomorus ? (fruits)
I took these pictures in Kruger NP (Berg en Dale Camp) in october.
Thanks in avance.

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Re: Ficus sycomorus ? (fruits)

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Hey welcome to the forums!

I would agree on it being Sycamore Fig! :thumbs_up:
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Re: Ficus sycomorus ? (fruits)

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It could be either Ficus sycomorus, or Ficus sur.
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Re: 20 trees in knp for beginners

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Herwith photo of a sycamore fig, lighter bark, and sausage tree, which have become "one tree". Situated on S139, Biyamiti private road.

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Re: 20 trees in knp for beginners

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Common Cluster Fig (Sycamore Fig).

This is a huge tree that can grow up to 25m.
Common on the banks of rivers. There is a beautiful specimen at Girivana waterhole where we have spent many hours enjoying the wonderful setting and also some great sightings.

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The bark is smooth and yellowish. The canopy is wide and small figs are borne in heavily branched masses on the trunk and main branches.

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The leaves are simple, clustered around the branches.

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Flowers, like in all figs, are borne inside the fruit and are not visible. The fruit is green to yellow-brown, turning pink on ripening. Fruit ripens throughout the year and trees can produce up to four crops per year. The fruit is eaten by baboons, monkeys, and bushbaby. Fallen fruit is eaten by bushpig, ***, warthog and many antelopes. Also a favourite with green pigeons, brown headed parrots, hornbills and barbets.

The trunk is used to make drums such as those seen at many of the Kruger restaurants.
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Sycamore Fig.

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The Sycamore Fig.

Ficus sycomorus, called the sycamore fig or the mulberry-fig (because the leaves resemble those of the Mulberry), has been cultivated since ancient times.

It is native to Africa south of the Sahel where the tree is usually found in rich soils along rivers and in mixed woodlands. To experience these magnificent trees, take spend some and have a look at the micro-habitat to so many other species of Bats, Birds, Insects and Mammals, you will be surprised at what hides in the branches and shade of this giant of Africa.

Ficus sycomorus grows to 20 m tall and 6 m wide with a dense round crown of spreading branches. The leaves are heart-shaped with a round apex, 14 cm long by 10 cm wide, and arranged spirally around the twig.

They are dark green above and lighter with prominent yellow veins below, and both surfaces are rough to the touch. The petiole is 0.5–3 cm long and pubescent. The fruit is a large edible fig, 2–3 cm in diameter, ripening from buff-green to yellow or red. They are borne in thick clusters on long branchlets or the leaf axil. Flowering and fruiting occurs year-round, peaking from July to December. The bark is green-yellow to orange and exfoliates in papery strips to reveal the yellow inner bark. Like all other figs, it contains a latex.

This species of fig requires the presence of the symbiotic wasp, Ceratosolen arabicus, to reproduce sexually.

In tropical areas, where the wasp is common, complex mini-ecosystems involving the wasp, nematodes, other parasitic wasps and various larger predators, revolve around the life cycle of the fig. The trees' random production of fruit in such environments assures its constant attendance by the insects and animals which form this ecosystem.

The Ancient Egyptians cultivated this species "almost exclusively".
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Re: Sycamore Fig.

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Gmlsmit thank you for sharing some very interesting information regarding a very striking tree. Do you perhaps know what the relationship is with the sycamore trees that you find in America and Australia, is it the same tree?
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