Photo Theme: Macro

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Johan van Rensburg
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Photo Theme: Macro

Unread post by Johan van Rensburg »

Macro photography does allow a person the pleasure of pursuing one’s hobby in places and at times when the “normal” subjects are not around. It can, however, lead to some amusing moments. Picture a rather large rough-looking character in fetus-position on the ground, down on his knees intent on snapping a tiny object when suddenly a pair of small scuffed sneakers shuffles into view. When you lift your head you find yourself level with the runny nose of a three-year old who wants to know: “What you doin’?”

Macro photography is not subject matter explained to a toddler – do not even try… They query every explanation you give them with: “Why?”. (Kid, don’t you know any other letter of the alphabet!?)

Now, when I draw anyone’s attention under the age of 21, I mumble: “…lost it, found it, thanks” excuse myself and move to another spot.

Just thought I’ll mention a drawback of macro photography…

Here are some of my macro efforts:

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Johan van Rensburg
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Unread post by Johan van Rensburg »

esp that last one Wasps??


You are right - wasps it were in the roof of the Lake Panic hide, right above my head. They were well-behaved though, it was not any wasp activity that caught my eye, but rather a swallow that had it's nest closeby. Noticed the wasp nest when attempting to "shoot" the swallow coming out of its nest.

What is great about many Marco subjects is that they SIT STILL! So, often in desperation, (like in this case :roll: )I take the easier shot...
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francoisd
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Unread post by francoisd »

When is a photo considered a macro and not just a close-up?

Here are a couple of my "macro" photos

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Johan van Rensburg
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Unread post by Johan van Rensburg »

Interesting perspective, the redbug – it somehow landed up on the windscreen of my car near Shingwedzi and I thought it would make for an interesting shot.

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When I tried to identify the bug this “introduction” at the Transvaal Museum quickly put paid to that ambition: With around one million named species and perhaps several times that number unnamed, insects account for a great majority of the species of animals on earth. They are a tremendously successful group. Insects also show huge variety in shape and form. Almost the only condition their group does not attain is very large body size. A number of features, however, are shared by most kinds of living insects. In addition to the general characteristics of uniramians, these include a body composed of three tagmata, a head, thorax, and abodmen; a pair of relatively large compound eyes and usually three ocelli located on the head; a pair of antennae, also on the head; mouthparts consisting of a labrum, a pair of mandibles, a pair of maxillae, a labium, and a tonguelike hypopharynx; two pairs of wings, derived from outgrowths of the body wall (unlike any vertebrate wings); and three pairs of walking legs.

So, unless we have some forumite with specific knowledge of this redbug – that is what it will remain – a redbug!

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The dragonfly we encountered at the Nyawutsi hide. What makes this insect interesting to me is that it appears to have a set of wings on ONE side of its body only, and yet it managed flight quite competently! Dragonflies are found world-wide except for in extremely cold regions such as Antarctica, northern Canada and Asia, and Iceland. There are about 5,000 species. Again, I have no idea to which specie this specimen belongs. I imagine one can get totally taken in by dragonflies as a photographic subject – they are so colourful in appearance, life cycle and habits!
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Johan van Rensburg
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Unread post by Johan van Rensburg »

Got some more macro shots at a KZN venue. Some strange fly
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and a shot of an impressive spider. The spider's web was spanning accross a road. We saw the spider, but not the anchor line holding it up, so we actually made the web collapse as we drove through underneath. What was amazing was the spider's actions following this incident. It appears to collect the destroyed web and the retreated back up into a tree. A friend of mine are of the opinion that the spider will somehow recycle the silk into a new web. How true that is I do not know, but the pix shows the blob of silk that the spider had collected!
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Unread post by DuQues »

Johan van Rensburg wrote:A friend of mine are of the opinion that the spider will somehow recycle the silk into a new web.

10/10 for your friend!
Since spider's silk is made of protein, all web-weaving requires considerable amounts of protein. Recycling is the easy way to get it back, and even if a spider misses a few meals, it can still go on spinning webs.
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Unread post by katydownunder »

Johan van Rensburg wrote:Interesting perspective, the redbug – it somehow landed up on the windscreen of my car near Shingwedzi and I thought it would make for an interesting shot.


:lol: And I thought I was the only one thinking that it might be an interesting idea to take a pic of an insect that landed on the windscreen of the car..... :wink:

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And another Insect that liked our car.
This little guy was sitting on the rubber edge of the side window and was just about 1,5 cm long.

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Again not a 'real' macro, but my most favourite close up.

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Delicate beauty

Unread post by Meandering Mouse »

I do not have all the right lenses, but somehow certain beauty shines out, no matter what.

This was taken at Shitlehave dam.

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