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Letaba Elephant Hall

Discuss the different camps and roads of the Kruger National Park
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SANParks
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Unread post by SANParks » Tue Jan 03, 2006 6:31 pm

I just enquired about this...

The hall is currently being revamped. Updated material has been written, new displays have been designed and new exhibits are in development. Although a final date for all this to go live is not yet set, visitors should be able to see the new improved museum within the first quarter of 2006.

Hope this helps.

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Unread post by LittleLeopard » Tue Jan 03, 2006 7:47 pm

My first memory of the Elephant Hall at Letaba is from 1994. After that, I remember the skull exhibit (tusk penetrating skull) inside being added and the elephant statue outside. I never noticed any other major change.

I agree that it's time for an update, but please leave Mafunyane's tusks (and the others :P) and the little elephant fetus.
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Unread post by christo » Wed Jan 04, 2006 11:42 pm

They can start by displaying Mandleves' ivory, which is the heaviest ever recorded in the park.
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Elephant museum- Letaba

Unread post by Bosvelder » Tue May 02, 2006 3:19 pm

I have watched with growing interest the letters, replies etc about the museum, and feel I should say something as well. Go and visit it now, and see how it has changed!
A lot of time, effort and money has been spent on an upgrade and I may add, a lot of money and time was was donated by Honorary Rangers of the Bushveld region to enable the display of the elephant skeleton.
It is not possible to change the display with every new happening in the world, but it would help to have a board to display news worthy items.
Next time any of you go there, make the suggestion to the person on duty, it will get to the right ears, I promise.
The museum does not generate any income, so the goodies that are on sale there help a great deal to fund new items, I know (from a reliable source) that the videos that are shown on weekends and holidays are in the process of being converted to DVD's, another project of the HR's of Bushveld region.
Yes, Mandleve's tusks are there now, in the original skull, and are very impressive, I can tell you.

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Imberbe
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Unread post by Imberbe » Tue May 09, 2006 11:53 pm

Yes, the new exhibition is really worth a visit! It is well done, interesting and leaves you with a new respect for the really "big ones"!

Well done SANParks, HR's and sponsors!
:wink:
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Unread post by Fizzpop » Sat May 13, 2006 11:03 am

Thanks for the feedback on the "New" Elephant Museum being open at Letaba.
I really look forward to seeing it!

To all involved, especially the Honorary Rangers, thank you for all your time and effort.
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New tuskers

Unread post by Wildman » Mon Aug 07, 2006 12:34 pm

I feel that the original atmosphere of the Elephant museum has been preserved.
Regarding the old information on the Magnificent 7, not much has changed…and rightly so.
However, what I find exciting and a really good addition to the museum, is the current Tuskers project and information.
It is really valid to current visitors and very possible to encounter one of these ‘new’ tuskers in the park – interesting and well worth paying some attention to.

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Unread post by DuQues » Mon Aug 07, 2006 1:42 pm

Don't forget that that information can be found on this site as well: Letaba Elephant Hall - Home of the Magnificent Seven
Not posting much here anymore, but the photo's you can follow here There is plenty there.

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c

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Unread post by gwendolen » Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:46 am

Image Image

Image Image

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Unread post by gwendolen » Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:48 am

Image Image

Image Image

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Unread post by Elsa » Sun Sep 03, 2006 3:53 pm

Thanks so much for posting those pics Gwen, the musuem looks really great now,
not that it was that bad before. :wink:
Certainly a very interesting place to visit when in that area. :D

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Letaba Elephant hall

Unread post by Bosvelder » Fri May 25, 2007 9:21 am

We have all our eggs in one basket in the Elephant hall, so to speak.
The tusks of the Magnificent 7 are there.
There is a beautiful skeleton, the heaviest tusks, the longest tusks, and so forth.
I am appealing for some help to enable us to replace the entrance doors of the hall, the doors that protect this National Treasure of ours.
The Bushveld region HR's have undertaken to repair and maintain the doors and we are now looking for help to install new ones.
One of our members is adept at carpentry and will provide the labour, but to get solid, decent doors that will reflect the treasure that we are protecting, seems a huge task, and cost.
Is there anybody out there who is willing to help with a set of solid doors, with a unique elephant motif on it?
We are willing to pay, but will also be willing to accept a donation (full or partial)
No entrance fee is charged to visit the hall, but we do need to make the entrance door something special, and to this end we need help. Pleeezzze?

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gmlsmit
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The magnificent seven

Unread post by gmlsmit » Wed Jun 17, 2009 6:07 pm

Introduction

As long as man can remember, Elephants have been of the most fascinating of all mammals.
Maybe it is their size, maybe it is their habits, maybe it is their beautiful ivory tusks and maybe it is just the combination of all.

Hannibal used them . . . . . . during his campaigns to conquer the world, they have been hunted for their beautiful ivory, they have been chased from land on which their ancestors roamed for thousands of years, and they have now found refuge in Nature Reserves and National Parks from the encroaching exotic man.

Visiting tourists will stop to watch an old Bull with his accompanying Askaris, who are being taught how to be one day, be good Elephant bulls.
Or just an old Bull, peacefully feeding in the reeds or in the bush, waving his ears, dreaming of years gone by.
Or a herd with their wise old matriarch leading them.
Teaching them how to be good Elephants and where the waterholes and best grazing is to be found.,
Most of all – teaching the mothers how to take care of their calves, who like all young, always seem to be in the way be in the way while walking around on their rubbery little legs, waving their rubbery little trunks and also waving their rubbery little ears.

Fortunately, our wonderful Continent – AFRICA – is still blessed with many of these spectacular animals, who seem to live not quite as man, fifty, maybe sixty years

Many marvelous stories are told about the size of these great mammals growing up to a height of 12 feet. ( nearly 3.7 metres) with a mass of 13000 lb ( 6000 kg) and tusks weighing in excess of 200 lb ( 91 kg) and reaching a length of 11ft ( 3.35 m ).

The largest set of tusks currently available are a pair kept in the British Museum of Natural History weighing 226.25 lb and 214 lb a side, originating from the Legamishura crater.
Another pair in the American Museum of Natural history weighing 189lb and 178 lb a side originating from Kenya.
Another pair came from an Elephant shot by the hunter : Maj. Powell-Cotton near Lake Albert in Uganda in the 1880’s, weighing 198 lb and 174 lb a side.
A pair weighing 192 lb and 189 lb a side was shot in Tanzania in 1971.

The hunter Harry Manners shot an Elephant with a set of tusks weighing 185 lb and 183 lb a side on the Malawi border.

The famous hunter in AFRICA F.C. Selous mentioned that the largest tusk known coming from Botswana came from the Ngami Lake area; weighing 179 lb.

Many more stories are told about massive tusks.

The longest set of tusks known belonged to an Elephant shot by Maj. Powel-Cotton measuring 11ft 5in and 11 ft ( 3.48 and 3.35 m ) respectively.

A legendary tusker was Ahmed roaming the plains of Marsabit in Kenya, who was proclaimed a National Monument and had a game guide assigned to looking after him.
Ahmed’s tusks were recovered after he had died – a perfect matched pair weighing 148 lb a side.

These large tuskers mentioned are not often seen today, however a tusk weighing in excess of 100 lb (45, 45 kg) is spectacular and a pair meeting this criteria – even more so.

It is not only for sentimental reasons that the tuskers should be preserved, it is mainly for the future existence of Elephants, should there be no large tuskers, lesser bulls would spread their genes and LARGE TUSKERS as we are still fortunate to view today, may just become a myth . . . .
How sad would that be to the generations still to follow, for both species Homo Sapiens and Loxodonta Africana

Possible not very many more than a one and a half dozen sets of tusks exceeding 45 kg apiece have been found in the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK during the past forty years.
I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 159 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.

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Re: THE MAGNIFECENT SEVEN

Unread post by gmlsmit » Wed Jun 17, 2009 6:10 pm

Large Tuskers of the Kruger National Park.


Of the Field staff of the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK was aware of quite few large Elephant bulls roaming their bush, carrying good ivory. For fear that, they may be poached; this was their very well kept secret.

The scientists calculated the habitat capacity for Elephants in KRUGER and in order to avoid overpopulation, started a culling programme, which generated much negative publicity and animosity towards the South African National Parks Board.

Not all done to Elephants by the scientists was bad, but few would believe this. It was then decided that in order to improve their image with the public, a publicity campaign was to be launched, many ideas were put forward, all were considered but deservedly the one chosen was that the very close kept secret be revealed.

A name was needed and then Dr. U de V ( Tol ) Pienaar came up with the bright idea : THE MAGNIFECENT SEVEN. It was accepted and that is how it all started.

Most nature lovers were thrilled when this campaign came to life.

Paintings were made, publications were distributed, and radio and television programmes were made and broadcast. It appears that a new awareness of Mother Nature and all Her Children had been born.

The names of THE MAGNIFECENT SEVENwere :

NDLULAMITH

KAMBAKU

DZOMBO

MAFUNYANE

SHAWU

JOAO

SHINGWEDZI



Who had all grown to the age of fifty years plus and adorned the plains and the bush of the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK.

Sadly now they are all part of history but for fortunately for many years they had the opportunity to be the herd bulls and must have sired many of the emerging tuskers, which we as privileged visitors to this Animal Eden occasionally catch a glimpse of.

Today visiting tourists admire their tusks and their details, which are on display in the Elephant Hall at the Letaba Rest Camp of the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK.

The Goodwill of the Goldfields Group sponsored the Elephant Hall.

What has always impressed me is the respect shown by the visitors when inside, it is quiet and it is not unlike visiting some old cathedral in Europe . . . . Sacred!
Last edited by gmlsmit on Wed Jun 17, 2009 6:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 159 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.

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Re: THE MAGNIFECENT SEVEN

Unread post by gmlsmit » Wed Jun 17, 2009 6:15 pm

Ndlulamithi-Taller than the Trees

Image


This name Ndlulamithi originates from the Shangane-Tsonga speaking people as well as the Nguni people.

This old giant roamed the plains and bush of the western area of the Kruger National Park. Between Letaba and Punda Maria.

This aggressive yet secretive old giant of the AFRICAN SAVANNAH was seldomnly seen.

His shoulder height is estimated to be between 340-345 cm.

His tusk details are :
Length : L 287 cm, R 273 cm.
Mass : L 64.6 kg, R 57.2 kg.
Circumference at lip : L 48.8 cm R 48 cm.

NDLULAMITHI died of natural causes in 1985 at an estimated age of 58 years. Paul Zway the then section Ranger found his carcass in the Shangoni area.

The tusks of this old giant of the bush are on display in the Goldfields Elephant hall in Letaba.
Last edited by gmlsmit on Tue Jun 23, 2009 9:14 pm, edited 3 times in total.
I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
No to Hotels in and commercialization of our National Parks.
No to Legalized Rhino and Lion trade.
Done 159 visits to National Parks.
What a wonderful privilege.


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