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Breaking News: Astronomically Speaking

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onewithnature
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Re: Breaking News: Astronomically Speaking

Unread post by onewithnature » Mon Sep 08, 2014 5:27 pm

Tonight is the Harvest Full Moon, so called because it happens at the time of harvest in the Northern Hemisphere, near the Autumnal Equinox. Do look out for it, northern mites as it is usually casts bright light for a longer period of time. Interestingly, the Chinese - and I'm not sure if we have any Chinese mites here - celebrate tonight's moon with festivities, where they enjoy "mooncakes". :D
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Elsa
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Re: Breaking News: Astronomically Speaking

Unread post by Elsa » Sun Aug 28, 2016 9:57 am

Did anyone see or get a pic of the Venus/Jupiter conjunction last night!



On August 27, 2016, the sky’s two brightest planets Venus and Jupiter will stage the year’s closest conjunction of two planets. These worlds appear only about 1/15th degree apart on the sky’s dome. How close is that? Well, 1/15th of a degree is the equivalent of about 1/7th to 1/8th of the moon’s apparent diameter. That’s a very small span, and these two worlds will easily fit within the same binocular or telescopic field of view.

These worlds are close to the sunset, so you’ll need to look shortly after sunset to see them.

From anywhere worldwide, you’ll also want an unobstructed horizon in the direction of sunset.

Have binoculars? Take them along with you for your Venus and Jupiter search.

Given a clear sky, you should see Venus and then Jupiter popping out near the sunset point on the horizon around 30 to 40 minutes after the sun goes down. These recommended almanacs can help you find the sunset time in your location.


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