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Crow, House

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa
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wildtuinman
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Crow, House

Unread post by wildtuinman » Tue Jan 05, 2016 12:21 pm

Regarded as vermin, but in my mind they are perhaps the most colourful of the crows in SA.

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Latest Lifer(s): Burchell's Courser, Cory's Shearwater, Wilson's Storm-Petrel, European Storm-Petrel, Great Winged Petrel, Grey Waxbill, Cape Rock-jumper

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hilda
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Re: Crow, House

Unread post by hilda » Wed Jan 06, 2016 3:13 pm

Very special Wildtuinman! I have never seen one of them! Beautiful picture too! :clap: :clap:
"We must use time wisely and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right." - Nelson Mandela

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Johan van Rensburg
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Re: Crow, House

Unread post by Johan van Rensburg » Wed Aug 03, 2016 2:04 pm

This inglorious alien is regarded as one of the world’s 100 most damaging invasive species. The Cape Town House Crow population established itself in the early 1980’s and increased to approximately 10,000 by November 2008. House crows have a reputation as aggressive, opportunistic feeders having a negative impact on indigenous bird and animal populations, agricultural crops and domestic poultry. Early attempts to control the population in Cape Town failed mainly as a result of unsustainable funding and opposition from the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. However, House Crow attacks on residents in the informal settlements became frequent events and were reported in the media. City leadership realized the need to act and committed to fund the control programme. Since the start of the Indian house crow control programme in December 2009, the population has been reduced to less than 500 birds.

House Crow populations have established in Durban and Richards Bay as well. Eradication programmes are practiced at both these centres. In Durban only a handful of crows are surviving, apparently having learnt to evade the wiles of man. Getting the last few crows is proving very difficult.

Image

Lifer for me, but this Cape Town bird represents trouble. Few people know about the issues around the House Crow and as a result of this unawareness, the House Crow expansion tends to go unnoticed with massive socio-economic impacts and biodiversity loss inevitable. When the scale of the havoc becomes noticeable, it is usually way down the track and restoring balance becomes a costly and time-consuming exercise.

The House Crow story in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania, is frightening: the Tanzanians had an eradication programme in place that saw more than a million crows killed in a two-year period. This programme came to a halt due to mismanagement of funds and the crow population bounced back past previous pest levels (1000 birds per square kilometre). Dar-es-Salaam is now the springboard for House Crow expansion into the heart of Africa. It is inevitable that the rest of the continent will eventually come under threat from this central stronghold.

World-wide the crow has caused more than 30 countries to officially take issue with it!

With what is happening globally, curbing the House Crow population is going to be a never-ending battle…

The real problem is the ever-extending human population, a scenario within which the adaptable house crows are thriving. We have only ourselves to blame for this problem. With no end in sight for human population growth sooner or later balance in Nature will alter. The House Crow is but one symptom of that process.

We are the problem. We are the solution.
685 2016 lifers: Spotted crake, Lesser jacana, Burchell's courser, Double-banded courser, Rufous-tailed scrub robin, House crow, Manx shearwater, Antarctic prion, Northern giant petrel, Northern royal albatross

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hilda
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Re: Crow, House

Unread post by hilda » Wed Aug 03, 2016 4:02 pm

Wow Johan! Thanks for this information! I never knew it was such a huge problem! :doh:
"We must use time wisely and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right." - Nelson Mandela


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