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General Photography Chat

Discuss and share your wildlife photography, filming and equipment
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Reza
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Re: General Photography Chat

Unread post by Reza » Wed Sep 28, 2016 3:05 pm

One of the additional lenses is a Nikon AF-S Nikkor 55-200mm 1:4-5.6G - no idea what that means :mrgreen:

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lion queen
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Re: General Photography Chat

Unread post by lion queen » Wed Sep 28, 2016 4:48 pm

Reza wrote:One of the additional lenses is a Nikon AF-S Nikkor 55-200mm 1:4-5.6G - no idea what that means :mrgreen:


Hi Reza

Some simple explanations

Auto Focus - Silent Wave (AF-S) is a type of focusing motor used in a number of AF-Nikkor lenses; the AF-S motor is very fast and quiet.

55 - 200mm is your zoom range

4 - 5.6 is the lens aperture sizes

G = Gelding = The newest lenses from Nikon no longer have the aperture ring

I'll add some links for you on how aperture sizes works :thumbs_up:
You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough - Mae West

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lion queen
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Re: General Photography Chat

Unread post by lion queen » Wed Sep 28, 2016 4:54 pm

Reza, here is a link to aperture sizes topic

Want to know about those F-stops?
You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough - Mae West

Horrace
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General Photography Chat

Unread post by Horrace » Wed Sep 28, 2016 4:56 pm

My pleasure Reza, please access links like those lion queen may post and don't be be afraid to experiment. I threw away a whole
Kruger trips worth of photos because I was experimenting - while disappointed, I learned what does and does not work with my shooting style.

From my opinion, and others will definitely see it differently to me, the most effective way to learn photography is to shoot in manual, as it teaches you the relationship between "aperture" - how much light the lens is letting in and "shutter speed" - how much light the sensor is exposed to. Together with ISO, which in the old days referred to how much silver nitrate there was in film (mites can correct me on this), with more silver equaling more light - to achieve this the dots of silver nitrate became bigger as ISO went up, eventually you could see them in the photos and this was called grain - you will learn to balance these elements out and take amazing photos .

Don't forget to share those photos on the forum...

Horrace


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Reza
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Re: General Photography Chat

Unread post by Reza » Wed Sep 28, 2016 11:11 pm

Lion Queen and Horrace

Thanks again for the awesome tips and advice :clap: , I am now super excited and cannot wait to get started with the new camera
Still sounds a bit complicated but Im sure it will start making sense the more I work with the camera :cam:

R

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lion queen
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Re: General Photography Chat

Unread post by lion queen » Thu Sep 29, 2016 8:48 am

Reza it does sound complicated in the beginning, just take it slow, practice a LOT and it will soon be second nature.

Practice in good light and bad light to get to know your camera and what to expect in those circumstances

Practice with tripod and shooting with lens in hand, so you can see the difference it makes to your photo quality. Especially if your lens does not have VR (vibration reduction)

the most effective way to learn photography is to shoot in manual


This is manual settings, not to confuse with manual focus. Manual focus is a must most of the times, but there are times where Auto Fucus is the way to go (Cheetah chase for example :wink: )

Enjoy your new camera and please ask if you need any info or help :gflower:
You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough - Mae West

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onewithnature
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Re: General Photography Chat

Unread post by onewithnature » Sun Oct 16, 2016 12:50 am

Good advice, LQ. :clap: I think the best thing is to know is what mode to use for what type of photography, and to be so au fait with the adjustments that one does not need to think a lot to get the pic. Of course, this takes hundreds of hours of practice, but I find this to be essential for game photography, especially as the animals seldom pose in perfect light in an open spot for you. Many times one has to contend with branches in the way, waving grass across the face, backlit subjects, and a tendency for some animals - especially leopards and elephants - to turn away from the camera or position obstacles between you and it.

One thing I certainly want to invest in is a window monopod because I have had to champ at the bit in frustration on more than occasion when my nerves and muscles refused to comply with the photographic needs of a very exciting or once-in-a-lifetime sighting. In other words, there have been times I have struggled to stop shaking, with the result that many of the potentially perfect pics get spoilt by blur (especially in low light).

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Re: General Photography Chat

Unread post by onewithnature » Sun Oct 16, 2016 1:13 am

Horrace wrote:From my opinion, and others will definitely see it differently to me, the most effective way to learn photography is to shoot in manual, as it teaches you the relationship between "aperture" - how much light the lens is letting in and "shutter speed" - how much light the sensor is exposed to. Together with ISO ... you will learn to balance these elements out and take amazing photos.


Horrace, I learnt photography before the days of digital cameras and I confess that I prefer manual settings and adjustments to the modern do-all kits. The only time I find auto-focus useful is in situations where the subject is moving quickly across the viewfinder, where the lock-on feature is often the difference between clear and blurred pics; otherwise I prefer to focus myself. ISO film was easy to use, but lacked the versatility of multiple-ISO-setting adjustments of modern cams. Also, if you're a whizz in post-shooting adjustments, all kinds of wonderful effects can be achieved. However, I confess, I am far more proud of a picture I got close to perfect on my own, as opposed to playing around at leisure afterwards and pretending that the finished product was actually an accurate depiction of my skills in the moment.
EVERYBODY'S TR!
TR: A NEW DAY IS S-OWN
TR: NECTAREAN NICETIES OF THE NORTH
TR: PRIMEVAL PLEASURE

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." (Groucho Marx)

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onewithnature
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Re: General Photography Chat

Unread post by onewithnature » Sun Oct 16, 2016 1:21 am

JDW wrote:Hi Dikkes
Focus using Centre Weighted and Spot Metering if the 5200 has the option - it will have Spot metering.
Using spot metering aim for the animals eye(s)
I would use the following settings
A - Aperture Priority
ISO - in daylight - 200-400
F stop - As low as you can get to f2.8
If the animal is not moving and you are shooting hand held you need a shutter speed of about 1/300 - this will eliminate camera shake.
If taken from a vehicle ensure that you turn the engine off - again this will stop camera shake.
If the animal is moving I would suggest a shutter speed of 1/500 or more - you may need in some light to increase the ISO to achieve it.
Avoid zooming as this will slow the shutter speed - get closer if you can without moving into the animals space.
Good luck
JDW


Great advice, JDW. :clap: :clap: Sometimes, one has to move away from complications and go for common sense. I've seen many newbies with top-of-the-range cameras and lenses that produce pics that are less impressive than a simple point-and-shoot, all because they get caught up in the myriad potential complications that multiple-features can create.
EVERYBODY'S TR!
TR: A NEW DAY IS S-OWN
TR: NECTAREAN NICETIES OF THE NORTH
TR: PRIMEVAL PLEASURE

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." (Groucho Marx)


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