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 Post subject: Badgers
Unread postPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2005 1:11 pm 
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A possible tell-tale sign that a badger could be around is when you can spot a pale chanting-goshawk. They like picking up the escapees from a badger rampage.


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 Post subject: Honeybadger
Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2005 12:54 pm 
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They are very fierce creatures, difficult to grip because of a loose skin and with their sharp claws and teeth they will rip, tear, bite anything to smithereens!

There has been an observation of a leopard killing a badger. It took the good part of 2 hours and the leopard looked like it was hit by a truck!

It is said that most animals will avoid crossing roads with the badger. There also has been a case of a badger castrating a full grown buffalo!

It is also unbelievebly immune against snake bite as a tv program showed one being hit by a cobra and after killing and eating the cobra went down for a couple of hours, returning to normal as if it went for a afternoon dose.

There are definetly some truth in the saying: "so taai soos 'n ratel"!


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2005 2:24 pm 
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Strong little bugger, commonly mistaken with a White Tail Mongoose.

I would not take one of them on. Imagine taking on a bee hive and going through so many stings...

Not even my wife has such a sweet tooth.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2005 1:37 pm 
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A pic of a honeybadger lying under my combi eating chicken at Lower Sabie. It knocked the dustbin over three times to get at raw chicken that I had put in the bin.
Image


Last edited by Freda on Sun Aug 20, 2006 6:27 am, edited 3 times in total.

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 Post subject: Badger conservation - good work
Unread postPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2005 8:49 pm 
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The best example of conservation of a mammal carnivore EVER to my knowledge was to do with honey badgers. Western Cape badgers were being persecuted - owing to them breaking into hives. Badger researchers, Begg couple stepped in, decided to introduce stilted hives out of reach, and got whole honey industry to convert to this. As they contacted the major retailers of quality food products, Woolworths, to only accept honey from apiaries that adopted to raise their hive boxes. They have since boycotted all that dont adopt this procedure, and honey badgers have won, so far. It is now familiar to all the 'honey badger friendly' honey on honey jars. - Guess most know this story in SA already -

The point I am making is that that is REAL conservation entailing driving in traffic and meeting the head of woolworths in TOWN not in the bush, and meeting staunch & menacing farmers. Lots of animal research is just glamourous in a landrover following snowy the lion, Jona the gorilla or pinky the elephant and what not, and adds little bits of information that supposedly endorses their conservation - ..whatever. We already know without anymore research HOW to conserve large mammals in protected areas. It is outside where more needs to be done..

People are still in mindset to have to do charismatic animal research, and supposedly impress colleagues, the public ?, I dont know ? The writing is on the wall for single species, large, charismatic animal studies..


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 Post subject: Re: Badger conservation - good work
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2005 11:28 am 
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wildjohn wrote:
We already know without anymore research HOW to conserve large mammals in protected areas. It is outside where more needs to be done..

Not quite, there always are conflicting interests, see this article about another species on the brink of extinction. :(
Helped with the left hand, and destroyed with the right hand.... :shock:

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 7:42 am 
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as "luck" would have it, there is a free chapter on Ratels taken from the Richard Estes book The Behaviour Guide to African Mammals. The course is the updated version of the book... look herefor more details, under the free lesson for Behaviour Guide to Mammals of the RSA Lowveld.

there are another 18 or so free bits from other subjects as well for those interested.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2005 6:43 am 
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Saw a documentary on Kalahari/Kghalagadi badgers last night, well only half of it atleast.

It was the one about the badger that got hit by a "puffy" and ate some of the snake untill the venom set in. He laid still for 2 hours looking like dying and then recovered and finsihed the snake too.

Interesting thing is he grabbed a mouse from the snake and ate that before he went with great tenacity after the snake.

An old female was caught by a leopard and after an hour's fight was all but dead.

Another one climbed into a tree after a 1.5m cape cobra the cobra tried to escape but fell out of the tree and the badger comically reversed climbed down the tree and completely devoured the snake. They always start at the head and work their way down. The one thing with badgers is that they don't stop after eating one snake, they just go on to find the next.

It was so funny to see how the mother and cub interacted. He realy is raised to be tough some day. It was extremely funny how the little one when eyed by a jackal turn very aggresively onto the jackal. The little one could barely walk. He was so angry at the jackal that he fell head over tail while growling at the intruder into his den.

I have now decided that this little animal must be the fiercest competitor alive on earth. It is my favourite animal and I wish that I can have the chance one day to help with research on them.

They give the true meanings to being tenacious tough and as hard to kill the devil himself.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2005 11:24 am 
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I love these little creatures, I also loved that video. If I remember correctly he passed out because he actually got bitten by the snake. I can just imagine what goes on in his little head...

Hmmmmm, Nyummie puffadder
must eat
must eat quickly
g e t t i n g s l e e e e e p y
******
******
Where was I?
Oh yea
Hmmmmm, Nyummie puffadder
must eat
must eat quickly


or maybe he was a drug addict getting his weekly fix of venom and then having a celebratory dinner

They are so tough it's incredible. I will face a musth bull elephant before one of them any day

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2005 10:33 pm 
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A friend related a story to us about a trip in Kalagadi, they were enjoying sundowners at a pan and hoping the feeding lions they had seen earlier in the afternoon would make a trip to the water. Their patience was rewarded as the whole pride arrived and they took brilliant photos of the "classic" 7 lionesses in a row drinking...when all of a sudden a badger broke from the brush and charged at the pride. Most of the lions where taken by surprise and backed off but 2 stuck around to take on the interloper. After much charging, hissing and clawing the badger won and cleared the waterhole. He then trotted to the water had his brief drink and then dissappeared as quickly as he came.

Our friends, who are veterans of the bush, say they have never seen such a plucky and viscious attack. The little guys have big ones :lol:

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2005 6:35 pm 
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The best known relationship is that between the badger and the pale chanting goshawk. Click this link for more info. It also explains why the badger - greater honeyguide association is not a scientific fact (yet?). Lots of other interesting stuff on that site. :D


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2005 10:14 pm 
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I found this information on the same link Jose.
Honey Badger
The honey badger is listed in the Guinness Book of records as the "Most fearless animal in the world" (2004).

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2006 2:52 pm 
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Yes, i heard of one taking on a wild dog...


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 Post subject: More badger behaviour
Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2006 11:19 pm 
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I have been fortunate to see a honey badger once. It was near Lower Sabie about five years ago. It was a strange scene, as we encountered the badger jogging (characteristically) through a section of burnt terrain. Imagine that, a black badger in a black terrain! We assumed that this was actually ideal for badgers as it provided a sort-of camouflage and there were probably many dead (by fire) insects and rodents, providing an ‘easy pickings’ free-meal.

One must admire this animal for its extremely tenacious personality! I have seen documentaries in which the badger can stand its ground against tough enemies and it has a remarkable ability to cope with snake venom and numerous beestings. If bitten by a snake, it may slip off into an almost comatose state, appearing dead, but awakens several minutes later and resumes feeding on its victim, the snake!

In Afrikaans we have a saying : ‘So taai soos a ratel’ which in English means: as tough as a badger!
If I had to give an award to an animal for the ‘toughest-bugger-out-there’ it would go to the honey badger.


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