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DuQues
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@Photoshop users

Unread postby DuQues » Mon Dec 05, 2005 12:52 pm

As you are reading this you must be a Photoshop user. :lol:
Just a few little hints to get PS started up a lot faster:

Disabling Plug-ins
Each time you launch Photoshop, it loads plug-ins and presets into memory.
The problem is that you may or may not need many of the plug-ins during the course of a session, but they eat into the memory allocation regardless.
So, how do you alleviate this problem? Well, if you find there are some plug-ins that you use rarely, if ever, during your Photoshop sessions, you can disable them temporarily and enable them on the rare occasions when you do need them. The tradeoff in faster loading and more free memory may be worth the odd occasion when you may need to quit Photoshop, enable the plug-in, and relaunch Photoshop.
To disable a plug-in, navigate to the Plug-Ins folder inside the Photoshop install folder and then insert a ~ (tilde) in front of the plug-in name, folder, or directory. For example, a good candidate to start with is the Digimarc plug-in, used to read and write watermarks. If your workflow never makes use of watermarking, loading it into memory each time you launch Photoshop is pointless.

You can also install or move the infrequently used plug-ins out of the plug-ins folder and into a new folder (it cannot be a subfolder because Photoshop will still see it and load into memory any plug-ins that it finds). Plug-ins are easier to move around on Mac OS than they are on the PC (though some do require an install or simply their serial number to be entered after they are launched).

If you do move the infrequently used plug-ins into this secondary folder, you can load them all in one go, as you need them; doing so, however, still requires a relaunch of Photoshop, unfortunately.
To load a plug-in, hold down Ctrl+Shift (Windows) immediately after you launch Photoshop and then specify the additional plug-ins folder when asked.

While you're in the Plug-Ins folder, you can safely disable some of the files in the File Formats folder that have been gathering dust because you have rarely, if ever, used them since you installed Photoshop. Some of the prime candidates to consider are as follows:
- FilmStrip; Animation file format used by Adobe Premiere and After Effects
- PCX; PC Paintbrush file developed by Zsoft
- PhotoCD; A file format developed by Kodak for storing images on a CD
- Pixar; A file format designed specifically for exchanging files with PIXAR image computers
- Targa; Used widely by high-end paint programs and ray tracing packages

Cache Settings for Image Cache Levels
When you view an image in the document window at anything less than 100% magnification, Photoshop can use downsampled, low-resolution cached versions of the 100% view for speedier redraws. This can be helpful if you constantly work on large images and you need to zoom out frequently. However, it will take longer to open files while Photoshop creates the low-resolution previews.
You can specify the number of cache levels in the preferences/Image & Memory Cache screen. Needless to say, the higher the number of cache levels, the more resources Photoshop needs to consume. If you have limited RAM, or scratch disk space, you may wish to set the level to 1 or 2; the default is 4 levels. You can go as high as 8 levels, which will give you cached views at 66.67, 50, 33.33, 25, 16.67, 12.5, 8.33, and 6.25%. Setting the cache level to 1 is the same as turning it off because only the current view is cached at that setting.

Note: Although the cached views can help with speedier redraws, you'll do well to remember that any reading that you take based on a cached view will be misleading; for example, when you sample a color or use a cached view to judge the effect of a filter, such as USM, it will not be based on actual pixels. For critical readings, always view the image at 100% magnification (View/Actual Pixels).
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c

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DuQues
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Unread postby DuQues » Fri Dec 15, 2006 2:39 pm

Adobe has released a free beta download of Photoshop CS3 for both Mac and Windows. It is available to anyone with a Photoshop CS2 serial number.

You can read the details at PhotoshopNews.com and download the program (it's big!) at the Adobe Labs web site.

Photoshop CS3 won't ship until some time in the first half of '07, but Mac Intel users have been chomping at the bit, and Windows users won't be unhappy with this Christmas present either.

Use at your own risk of course, it is a Beta, which means that things can still go wrong with the program.
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c


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