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 Post subject: White balance
Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 8:44 am 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 4:57 pm
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Location: Polokwane, Limpopo Province
Hi

This is a new term to me. Seen the settings on my digital camera and not sure what to do with it.

Can one of you wonderful experts please translate in simple english what this function is used for.

Much appreciated.


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 Post subject: White Balance
Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 10:32 am 
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:roll:
According to my boyfriend who always plays around with his camera, the white balance is when you take pictures in a florescent light without a flash, sometimes the white colours come out yellow. This is an option to stop this from happening. Something like that... But I will go and make sure tonight in the manual.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 11:38 am 
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Honorary Virtual Ranger
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White balance: In digital camera terms an adjustment to ensure that colours are captured accurately (without any colour cast) whatever lighting used.

Shameless copy and paste:
www.luminous-landscape.com wrote:
Unlike film, which basically comes with just two colour balances – Daylight and Tungsten, digital cameras and backs can be set to a wide range of colour temperature settings. With film, fine tuning can only be done with the use of CC filters in the field (if shooting reversal stock), or at the printing stage (if shooting negative). But all digital cameras have the ability to set the White Balance through the use of presets such as Daylight, Shade, Indoor, Fluorescent, Flash, etc. In some high-end digicams, and most DSLRs, exact Kelvin temperature values can also be set, although you will find that how each camera reacts to being set to 5700 Degrees, for example, will differ.

All cameras have as well an Auto White Balance mode – where the camera estimates the temperature of the light, based on an integration of what is recorded in the scene. Usually this works pretty well.

If one is shooting in Raw mode it's even easier. There is no colour temperature "baked" into the shot the way it is with JPGs. Instead, the white balance which is set in the camera, either manually or automatically, is simply a "tag" which accompanies the Raw file. The Raw conversion program uses this to display the file, but you are free to set the white balance to any temperature that you wish after the fact.

Most photographers know that the easiest way to get white balance correct is to take a shot of a gray card, or a white piece of paper. Then, when you're sitting at the computer with the file loaded into your favourite Raw converter, simply click on a shot of it taken in identical light to the shot that you want to white balance, and you've got it.


(Tungsten: TL and such..)

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 1:45 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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I have found auto nearly always does a good job - but the preset settings (for sunny, shade, etc) are there if the preview looks odd.

Sunsets can sometimes benefit from trying different settings. A shot with mixed lighting (eg indoors with lights but sun streaming through a window) can also give odd effects.

As DuQues piece states using a white card or grey card can give the best results. Again most digital cameras have this facility - manual colour balance. However its best to use paper designed for this (most camera shops sell it) as ordinary white paper often contains blue dyes - appear white to our eyes (which expect white paper to be white!) but can produce a photo which looks blue.

Richard


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 7:29 pm 
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Senior Virtual Ranger
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For a simplistic definition of white balance, it's a broad term which describes what filters eg. polarisers and warming and cooling filters do for SLR cameras eg. where you would attatch a polariser in bright sunlight to a SLR lens, a digital camera has a white balance setting so that your sky doesnt appear too pale and washed out.

I read this in my Minolta Dimage manual!


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 Post subject: Cameras and white Balance
Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 6:13 am 
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You camera will attempt to meter the scene and figure out, for processing purposes, what the correct white balance is, i.e. where the white pint, gray point and black point are.

It assesses this and then applies this to it's processing, or for RAW tags the file with a recommendation.

If it gets it wrong, and it often does, you need to adjust it.

In RAW you still have the original file.

In Jpg you lose the ability to manipulate the RAW data (the camera's done it already) but it is often saved if you're lucky, or good.

Cheers,

Rob

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Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 4:46 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Try this link, has a good explanation..... 8)


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Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2006 8:22 pm 
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Senior Virtual Ranger
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Have discovered another use for white balance: take a perfectly boring landscape and shoot it in tungsten mode (DQ is probably roling his eyes and saying "booooring" :D ) and it becomes a lovely, moody, blue scene. I think this could be fun for those overcast days where nothing is inspiring enough to capture!


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Unread postPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2006 10:40 am 
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:roll:


:lol:

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:30 am 
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Jay wrote:
Have discovered another use for white balance: take a perfectly boring landscape and shoot it in tungsten mode (DQ is probably roling his eyes and saying "booooring" :D ) and it becomes a lovely, moody, blue scene. I think this could be fun for those overcast days where nothing is inspiring enough to capture!


:roll:

If you shoot RAW, then you can add whatever white balance tickles your fancy....

for those with cameras that don't have RAW, then this may be something "fun" to do.....

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2006 10:17 pm 
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Senior Virtual Ranger
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lecter wrote:
Jay wrote:
Have discovered another use for white balance: take a perfectly boring landscape and shoot it in tungsten mode (DQ is probably roling his eyes and saying "booooring" :D ) and it becomes a lovely, moody, blue scene. I think this could be fun for those overcast days where nothing is inspiring enough to capture!


:roll:

If you shoot RAW, then you can add whatever white balance tickles your fancy....

for those with cameras that don't have RAW, then this may be something "fun" to do.....


:roll: or for those of us who can shoot raw but prefer instant gratification :lol:


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