Skip to Content

Hornbill: Grey

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa
User avatar
Loams
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 864
Joined: Fri May 20, 2005 8:48 am
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa

Hornbill: Grey

Unread postby Loams » Sun Jul 24, 2005 10:15 pm

Can anyone give me some info on this beautiful bird please? I don't have any proper info on them. (Never been extremely keen birder, that is about to change though)

Is it endagered? I saw masses this weekend in Bots and was wondering because I am sure I heard they are in trouble, but it seemed unlikely as I really saw a lot. Where we stayed we could hear them calling all the time as well and a very keen birder confirmed it was grey hornbill.
Operation "Duke" Member

Being African is not determined by race, but by what's in your heart

User avatar
Bosnimf
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 96
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 11:45 pm
Location: Pretoria, for now

Unread postby Bosnimf » Sun Jul 24, 2005 11:13 pm

I am pretty sure they are doing fine. See them at my house in Pretoria quite often, and lots of them in Kruger. The clever people will probably give you all the info tomorrow :twisted:

Here are just the most common facts:

Distribution:
Africa S of Sahara, s Arabia; in s Africa absent from most of highveld, KwaZulu-Natal, Cape, s Namibia and treeless Kalahari sandveld; extends S to Petrusburg and Bloemfontein (Orange Free State) in W and n KwaZulu-Natal in E.

Status:
Common resident; some local seasonal movements in Zimbabwe.

Habitat:
Bushveld, savanna, woodland.

Habits:
In pairs when breeding; otherwise gregarious in small groups or large dry-season concentrations of 100 or more birds. Forages in trees, rarely on ground; hawks insects in flight. Flight undulating, buoyant and dextrous; tail raised on alighting. Frequents grassfires. When calling flaps wings and points bill upwards.

Food:
Insects, solifugids, rodents, frogs, chameleons, seeds, fruit, peanuts.

Breeding:
Season: September to December (mainly October-November) in Zimbabwe, February-March in Namibia (after rains), October to November in Transvaal. Nest: Natural hole in tree, lined mainly with bark flakes; 3-4 m above ground; usually with chimney or funkhole above entrance; floor of hole about 10 cm below entrance; minimum size of entrance hole 2,5 cm wide, 3,5 cm high; diameter of nest chamber (20) 15-23,2-32 cm. Clutch: (25) 3-4-5 eggs. Eggs: White; measure (34) 37,4 x 26,9 (33,9-40 x 25-28,3). Incubation: (5) 24-25-26 days by female only. Nestling: (10) 43-45,5-49 days; female breaks out of nest 19-24 days after first egg hatches; nestlings re-seal entrance unaided.
There's never a reason to shout at someone unless they are in imminent danger!

User avatar
wildtuinman
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Posts: 5505
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Location: Chasing down the rarities

Unread postby wildtuinman » Mon Jul 25, 2005 6:40 am

See them quite often in and around PTA, their call sometimes sounds like a small dog making crying noises.
668
Latest Lifer(s): Buff-spotted Flufftail, Tree Pipit, Dimorphic Egret, Lesser Jacana, Citrine Wagtail, Black-tailed Godwit

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman

User avatar
Jose
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 1764
Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2004 12:06 am
Location: the Netherlands

Unread postby Jose » Mon Jul 25, 2005 7:01 am

The status according to Redlist.org (assessed 2004) is LC (Least Concern):

This species has a large range, with an estimated global extent of occurrence of 10,000,000 km². The global population size has not been quantified, but it is believed to be large as the species is described as 'common' in at least parts of its range (del Hoyo et al. 2001). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e., declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

[edit]cleaned up a bit. posted in kind of a hurry this morning.[/edit]
Last edited by Jose on Mon Jul 25, 2005 9:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

wildjohn
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 113
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2005 3:54 pm
Location: Venetia, Limpopo

Unread postby wildjohn » Mon Jul 25, 2005 1:19 pm

You may be thinking of the Ground Hornbill which is currently threatened, particularly outside protected areas, though one wouldnt believe it, considering how many you see on Kruger roads.

Yours,

w

User avatar
francoisd
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 1937
Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:38 pm

Unread postby francoisd » Tue Mar 07, 2006 1:53 pm

African Grey Hornbill (Tockus nasutus)

Some info in addition to that already listed by Bosnimf

Other names:
Afrikaans: Grysneushoringvoël
French: Calao à bec noir, Calao nasique, Petit Calao à bec noir
German: Grautoko
Dutch: Grijze Tok

This species is a large bird, at 45cm in length, but is one of the smaller hornbills. It has mainly grey plumage, with the head, flight feathers and long tail being a darker shade. There is a white line down each side of the head and one on the back which is visible only in flight. The long curved bill is black and has a small casque and a creamy horizontal stripe.

Sexes are similar, but the male has a black bill, whereas the female has red on the mandibles. Immature birds are more uniformly grey. The flight is undulating. The similarly sized Red-billed Hornbill has uniformly grey plumage.

This conspicuous bird advertises its presence with its piping pee-o pee-o pee-o call.
"The measure of life is not its duration but its donation." - Peter Marshall
www.flickr.com/groups/birdssa

User avatar
richardharris
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 543
Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2005 3:04 pm
Location: Nottinghamshire UK

Unread postby richardharris » Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:12 pm

Image

I will post a male later!

A very attractive hornbill - but not so well known as the yellowbilled as not quite so 'tame' in camps.

Richard

found it already!

Image

User avatar
francoisd
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 1937
Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:38 pm

Unread postby francoisd » Wed Mar 08, 2006 8:09 am

Great photos thus far beautifully demonstrating the differences between males and females. I must admit that I never before inspected the birds closely so have not noticed this marked difference between the sexes. :redface:
"The measure of life is not its duration but its donation." - Peter Marshall

www.flickr.com/groups/birdssa

User avatar
Snoobab
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
Posts: 411
Joined: Fri Aug 26, 2005 2:28 pm
Location: JHB

Unread postby Snoobab » Wed Mar 08, 2006 1:44 pm

I love Grey Hornbills and see them almost every trip. I know what I thought was everything about them, where to look for them, their call etc and yet like francoisd I have never before noted the distinct difference between male and female. Thanks guys for bringing this up and thanks francoisd for all the good info you have posted :thumbs_up:

zeedoc
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2006 12:09 pm
Location: PRETORIA

Unread postby zeedoc » Thu Nov 02, 2006 2:49 pm

Didnt find post on grey hornbill so posted here
Saw a grey hornbill in the middle of Pretoria yesterday!
Would anybody know if they a normally found in the Pretoria area?

User avatar
Johann
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 939
Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2005 8:29 am
Location: Stuck in Gauteng

Unread postby Johann » Thu Nov 02, 2006 5:31 pm

Don't know exactly how common they are but do know of quite a few regular sightings in Pretoria and surrounds.
Last edited by DuQues on Tue Oct 14, 2008 9:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Quotes
Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.
Albert Einstein

Latest lifers from Kruger NP:
Black Coucal Centropus grillii Swartvleiloerie
Flappet Lark Mirafra rufocinnamomea Laeveldklappertjie

User avatar
Johann
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 939
Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2005 8:29 am
Location: Stuck in Gauteng

Unread postby Johann » Fri Jun 20, 2008 10:55 am

Image
Female
Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.
Albert Einstein

Latest lifers from Kruger NP:
Black Coucal Centropus grillii Swartvleiloerie
Flappet Lark Mirafra rufocinnamomea Laeveldklappertjie

User avatar
Yolandé Oelsen
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
Posts: 821
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 11:17 pm
Location: Noordheuwel, Krugersdorp.SA

Re: Grey Hornbill

Unread postby Yolandé Oelsen » Mon Sep 01, 2008 1:24 pm

That is a Stunning picture Johann :clap: :clap:

I saw quite a few of them in shingwedzi this year. Lovely birds.
I am crazy about the yellow billed hornbill too.
Were fortunate to also see a Crowned Hornbill on the Mahonie loop at Punda.
Image
Male
Image
Female
Image
Crowned Hornbill
www.whereeaglesrest.co.za
STIFFNECK
"I'll rise up like the Eagle & I will soar with You because Your Spirit leads me on ~ by the Power of Your Love"

Jumbo

Re:

Unread postby Jumbo » Sun Oct 12, 2008 10:02 am

I had one in my garden in PTA this morning 8) …..thought I was having hallucinations this till I read this thread. :lol:

User avatar
Rusty Justy
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 2626
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:11 pm
Location: Sunninghill(JHB), Vaalwater & Beauty(Waterberg), Grahamstown(E.C)

Re: Grey Hornbill

Unread postby Rusty Justy » Sun Oct 12, 2008 4:22 pm

They are quite regularly seen, more so then one would think around PTA :D Still a special bird to seen in a built up area!
:dance: STIFFNECKS MEMBER :dance:

FGASA LEVEL 1


Return to “Birding in Southern Africa”