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Sandpiper: Wood

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa

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DuQues
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Sandpiper: Wood

Unread postby DuQues » Fri Nov 24, 2006 1:13 pm

Wood Sandpiper (By PhilQ)
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Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c

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Unread postby Johann » Tue Jun 19, 2007 3:13 pm

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Seen at Sunset dam if I remember correctly.
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Unread postby Obelix » Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:40 pm

Hi everyone. Saw this one in KNP during April 2008 close to Olifants Camp happily feeding away in the mud all on its own. We're thinking Wood Sandpiper, but we're having trouble with the Sandpipers more often than not and in some of the photos it looks more like a Green Sandpiper.
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Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

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Unread postby Johan van Rensburg » Thu May 01, 2008 9:19 pm

Obelix wrote:Hi everyone. Saw this one in KNP during April 2008 close to Olifants Camp happily feeding away in the mud all on its own. We're thinking Wood Sandpiper, but we're having trouble with the Sandpipers more often than not and in some of the photos it looks more like a Green Sandpiper.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.


Obelix, you are quite right this time :wink: . I guess the lack of white terminal spots that normally give Wood sandpipers their signature pattern didn't help much here... non-breeding individuals often loose all white markings on the upper parts. (And then this bird went and stuck cammo all over his bill to confuse you further! :lol: )
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Unread postby Obelix » Mon May 05, 2008 5:03 pm

Herewith two more picks (unfortunately still with a mud-covered bill, :D ).

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Image

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Unread postby wildtuinman » Mon May 26, 2008 8:18 am

wildtuinman wrote:
Obelix wrote:Hi everyone. Saw this one in KNP during April 2008 close to Olifants Camp happily feeding away in the mud all on its own. We're thinking Wood Sandpiper, but we're having trouble with the Sandpipers more often than not and in some of the photos it looks more like a Green Sandpiper.
Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.


Obelix, lets look at it and try to eliminate some options.

Contenders:
Common Sandpiper
Green Sandpiper
Wood Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Lesser Yellowlegs (highly unlikely due to distribution and recordings)
Greater Yellowlegs (highly unlikely due to distribution and recordings)
Marsh Sandpiper

1. The striped throat and breast and lack of white shoulder patch rules out Common Sandpiper.

2. Yellow legs, prominent supercilium (brow) extending to the back of the head rules out Green Sandpiper, Common Greenshank and Marsh Sandpiper (which also has a long and more slender bill).

3. The wings not projecting past the tail and being highly unlikely due to distribution and recordings rules out Lesser Yellowlegs and Greater Yellowlegs.

It only leaves one contender. One with yellow legs, lesser streaked breast, brown upper parts, long white supercilium(Sasol mentions it as eye-stripe which I battle to agree with and would rather think that it has a dark eye-stripe instead) and wings not projecting past the tail. And that is Marsh Sandpiper.

Sometimes by ways of elimination, you will find the only way of id'ing something like this bird.

Image


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Unread postby wildtuinman » Mon May 26, 2008 1:17 pm

O donner!!!

Thanks Johann, I mean Wood Sandpiper. Marsh Sandpiper was excluded in point nr. 2.

Oopsie! :redface:

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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby wildtuinman » Thu Sep 18, 2008 10:38 am

On first glance all of them looks like Wood Sandpiper.

The supercilium (eyebrow) rules out quite a few challengers here. it seems to extend to well past the eye and is a dull white color.

Furthermore the legs seem to fit the description of Wood Sandpiper's on all the pics. A dull yellow color.

The bill being basically as long as the head is also a good pointer for Wood Sandpiper.

And then lastly the coloration and patterns on the upper parts are diagnostic for this species.
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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Elsa » Wed Apr 15, 2009 2:41 pm

Could I ask for another confirmation ID please, :roll:

am I right in thinking these are Wood Sandpipers, also seen in Kruger in Feb.

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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Moegaai » Wed Apr 15, 2009 3:43 pm

Yes Elsa, spot on with your Wood Sandpiper call!

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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Elsa » Wed Apr 15, 2009 5:26 pm

Thanks again Moegaai for your confirmation. :thumbs_up:
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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby wingman » Thu Feb 25, 2010 8:46 am

Please confirm for me if these are:

Woods sandpiper
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Seen on Umgeni river Durban KZN - Many thanks

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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby JoelR » Thu Feb 25, 2010 1:06 pm

Yes, Wood Sandpiper.
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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Tilandi » Fri Mar 19, 2010 12:03 am

Common Greenshank? :hmz:
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Re: Identification Help - General Birds

Unread postby Niall » Fri Mar 19, 2010 5:34 am

Looks like a Wood Sandpiper, with spotting on the back and white eyestripe.

Greenshank is quite a bit larger, will show white on the rump extending up the back and the bill is heavier, slightly upturned.

Cheers

Niall.


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