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BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Elzet » Fri Jul 08, 2011 11:46 am

Thanks, Ods, great info. I suppose we are all inherently selfish and greedy - eat or be eaten :lol: :roll:
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby oddesy » Fri Jul 08, 2011 12:09 pm

Thanks E :thumbs_up: We are definitely selfish or greedy, Altruism is a touchy subject in the animal kingdom an I think you could for the most part argue that it does not exist in the truest sense besides in humans who have consciousness and can perform a behaviour that goes against our nature, but most animals will only think for themselves and there will always be some kind of reciprocation and if not that individual will be shunned or punished :shock:
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Elzet » Fri Jul 08, 2011 12:52 pm

oddesy wrote:Thanks E :thumbs_up: We are definitely selfish or greedy, Altruism is a touchy subject in the animal kingdom an I think you could for the most part argue that it does not exist in the truest sense besides in humans who have consciousness and can perform a behaviour that goes against our nature, but most animals will only think for themselves and there will always be some kind of reciprocation and if not that individual will be shunned or punished :shock:



It seems many humans nowadays also don't have consciences, Ods. And speak of altruistic. :wall: :wall:


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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Imberbe » Sat Oct 08, 2011 9:30 pm

What is the single most important use of feathers for birds in general?
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Rooies » Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:39 am

To keep warm because because they have got relatively thin skins.
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby saraf » Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:54 am

Sort of linked to Rooies answer, waterproofing.
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Imberbe » Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:07 pm

:thumbs_up:

Yes, experts tell us it is not flying as most will think. The primary use is isolation from the environment, as shown by birds which does not fly but still have feathers.

Rooies! :thumbs_up:
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Rooies » Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:28 pm

True or false? The majority of the world's kingfisher species eat fish. Please give percentages this way or that way.
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Rooies » Fri Oct 21, 2011 12:43 pm

No guess after 3 days, so here is the answer. Almost 66% of the world's kingfisher species don't eat fish.

I throw this quiz open to anybody but if nobody takes it up, I will try another one on Monday.
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Rooies » Fri Nov 11, 2011 8:53 am

Let's try another one.

Mousebirds
Anybody who has watched mousebirds will have noticed the way in which they often hang from twigs. with their feet level with their 'shoulders' Why are they able to do that?

Sunbathing behaviour is especially common after inclement weather, and is a consequence of mousebirds' susceptibility to feather wetting. Why the susceptibility?
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Rooies » Tue Nov 15, 2011 3:49 pm

No guess after almost 5 days? I will give the answer tomorrow and then I am out of the quizzies for good.
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Siobain » Tue Nov 15, 2011 7:28 pm

Q1. Although mousebirds can perch briefly in the same manner as that of other birds, their usual habit is to hang with the belly down between the legs and with the feet at upper-breast level. In this position, they generally use the tail or lower abdomen to prop themselves against some support, frequently a small branch.

When suspended, they are able to engage an anatomical device, such as that possessed by bats, which permits them to hang without additional energy expenditure. The highly flexible foot structure, which allows them to oppose one or two toes, or to turn all four forwards.

Such feet are a special adaptation as much to their foraging style as to food-handling, being used both to help the birds gain access to food and to transfer food to the bill. The toe positions may even differ simultaneously between the left foot and the right one.


Q2. If caught unawares by a rainstorm and become thoroughly drenched, they may lose the insulating properties to their plumage, then they are at risk of irreversible hypothermia. Temperature also plays a large role here, as they will die if there body temperature drops lower than 18°C.

Because the mousebirds lack down and the distal portions of their contour feathers, they would appear especially prone to such drenching. As a result, instances in which mousebirds are found dead on their perches, ("drowned" by downpours), are relatively frequent. They thus have a tendency to roost in rain protected areas.

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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Rooies » Wed Nov 16, 2011 10:37 am

Thanks Siobain. You are almost there, but I will give the answer.

Q1. They are able to do this because their legs join their bodies rather higher and more frontally than is usual in most birds. Their four toes all face forward, but the outer two can be reversed to point backwards. They can perch in an upright manner like other birds, but the hanging position is more favoured, especially when sunning.

Q2 Mousebirds are susceptable to feather wetting because their head and body feathers lack barbules: this causes the fur like appearance of the plumage, but also result in the the feathers becomming sodden and thus impairs their insulating properties. That is why they do not bathe in garden birdbaths, but are habitual dust-bathers.
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Siobain » Wed Nov 16, 2011 7:28 pm

Thanks Rooies :thumbs_up:

I guess as I am the only one to answer, I am IT!

As we know, vultures scavenge and eat mostly carrion. Most species will hunt if they have to, however, it is more difficult for them to do so than other raptors, why? And which 2 species of vulture have the most difficulty hunting for themselves, what is their added disability?
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Re: BIRD BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR (RV)

Unread postby Imberbe » Wed Nov 16, 2011 9:31 pm

Well most raptors kill their prey with their talons, not their beaks. For this they have very powerful and sharp talons. In contrast vultures do not posses powerful talons and they are not able to grab hold of their prey with the same deadly impact.

Most difficult? :hmz:

Probably the Egyptian and the hooded vultures, due to their thin beaks?
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