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 Post subject: Re: Markings Difference between Male and Female Leopard
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 12:52 pm 
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arks wrote:
as WAC says, the males are usually significantly larger with a heavier build.


Thanks for your help, I usually only see one at a time. :huh:

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 Post subject: Re: Markings Difference between Male and Female Leopard
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 2:27 pm 
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One can allways try to "feel" the differance. :hmz:

Might be a nice experiance to watch though. :whistle: :lol:


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 Post subject: Re-introduction of Mammals Into the Namaqua NP
Unread postPosted: Sat Dec 12, 2009 11:20 am 
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While I was searching the web the other day I read that the Namaqua NP was considering to introduce Cape Mountain Zebra into the park (but I may be wrong). Although I love re-introductions of wildlife into areas where they prviously occurred, according to Skead the mountain zebra that previously inhabited the Kamiesberg were Hartmann's mountain zebra, NOT Cape mountain zebra.

Although I have never been in the Namaqua NP, I have read many of the stories of the early travellers that explored both Little Namaqualand (SA Namaqualand) and Great Namaqualand (Namibia) and how they found various mammal species on those seemingly arid plains. For example the first sightings of Giraffe in South Africa was made in 1663 at the Spoeg River near Kamieskroon.

So does anyone know what is the possibility of reintroducing mega-herbivores like giraffe, black rhinoceros and elephant back into the Park.


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 Post subject: Cape Warthog
Unread postPosted: Sat Dec 12, 2009 2:22 pm 
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Does anybody have any information on the genetic integrity of the extinct "Cape Warthog". Was the Cape Warthog really a distinct species only based on dentition? What would have restricted the Common Warthog from moving into the Eastern and Western Cape (where today they are increasingly becoming more common)?

Any information would be appreciated!!


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 Post subject: Re: Re-introduction of Mammals Into the Namaqua NP
Unread postPosted: Sat Dec 12, 2009 6:18 pm 
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Hi 007 and welcome to the forums!

It would be very nice to see a wider variety of mammals in the SANParks, but it is a risky thing to do. Even if the mammal in question has lived in the place in question before, it does not mean it will still be able to live there due to droughts etc.

Also, it would probably mean that the other flora and fauna would suffer. I.e. over-grazing. Animals adapt to their habitats and habitats adapt to the animals living on them, so it is in the best interests of our national parks to intervene as little as possible.

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 Post subject: Re: Cape Warthog
Unread postPosted: Sat Dec 12, 2009 8:34 pm 
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Hi 007 :)

I found these great sources about the Cape Wathog, hope this helps!!

WikiAnswers
Wikipedia
ScienceDirect - genetics of two different warthogs

Wikipedia wrote:
Some common differences between the Cape Warthog and the extant warthog, P. Africanus, include:

-The skull is smaller, but broader
-The frontal area of the zygomatic arch is thickened by internal sinuses and is swollen into a round hollow knob in front of the jugal-squamosal suture (in P. Africanus, the zygomatic arch may be robust, but it is not thickened, and there is no knob
-There are never incisors in Phacochoerus aethiopicus, yet in a regular warthog, there are two incisors in the upper jaw and six in the lower
-In the Cape Warthog, the large third molars and different from those of P. Africanus because no roots would be formed by the time all the enamel columns have gone into wear
-In a typical warthog has two spherical pits in the back of their skull, and the Cape Warthog has them too, but they are many times larger

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 Post subject: Re: Cape Warthog
Unread postPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 3:38 pm 
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Thanx Wild about cats, some very interesting info!!!

I saw they separated the two species on dental and skull diferences, but interestingly enough there are three different general skull patterns within humans and yet humans are all the same species.


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 Post subject: Re: Mammals: Q & A
Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 4:50 pm 
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Hi there

This question may be somewhat off the subject and if so please direct me to correct thread.

Could you please tell me the correct plural of the mammals nmaes.
eg. Is it Five Zebra or Zebras, the same goes for the rest - Elephant, Lion etc.?

Thanks JJ

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 Post subject: Re: Mammals: Q & A
Unread postPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 4:12 am 
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Hi JJ

When you're talking about mammals as individual entities, you refer to them with the plural: so, "There were 5 lions in the pride" or "Three mongooses ran side by side". However, when you refer to the species as a whole, you use the singular: "So, lion and leopard are both carnivores" or "Elephant prefer to wallow in the heat of day". But, "3 elephants preferred to wallow in Sunset Dam at midday". Does that help?

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 Post subject: Re: Mammals: Q & A
Unread postPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 10:13 am 
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:thumbs_up: :thumbs_up: Thanks OWN

JJ

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 Post subject: Re: Mammals: Q & A
Unread postPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2010 2:39 am 
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:thumbs_up: You're welcome, JJ!

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 Post subject: Re: Mammals: Q & A
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2010 10:18 pm 
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does that apply for whales ?

"Whale migrate to breed" or "Whales migrate to breed" ?
:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Just being a smart alec :) No anser needed.

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 Post subject: Re: Mammals: Q & A
Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 14, 2010 11:25 am 
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I was watching a programme on TV yesterday where they were talking about a
Topi but it looked exactly like a Tsessebe to me.
It did have a young one at foot, so, is this another sub-species of Tsessebe or is it what the young are called?
I did check in my Mammal book and they were not too specific! :?
Thanks for any help.

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 Post subject: Re: Mammals: Q & A
Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 14, 2010 11:35 am 
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They are three seperate species of the Damaliscus genus. The Topi, Bangweula Tsessebe and Common Tsessebe. They were all once considered to be the same species with slight differences according to distribution (so therefore habitat), but they are now considered three genetically seperate species.
Topi - D. korrigum
Bangweula Tsessebe - D. superstes
Common Tsessebe - D. lunatus

The Topi and the Common Tsessebe are VERY similar in appearance, despite the fact that they are genetically different!

Hope this helps :D

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 Post subject: Re: Mammals: Q & A
Unread postPosted: Sat Aug 14, 2010 11:58 am 
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Yes, it does, thanks very much BushFairy. :thumbs_up:

So it seems it's just a question of location as to which species is where?

Must be similar to the various species of Zebra that occur throughout Africa.

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