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Filters & Hoods

Discuss and share your wildlife photography, filming and equipment

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bert
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Re: you can use any filter

Unread postby bert » Fri Nov 04, 2005 12:42 pm

lecter wrote:Never be shy to experiment, but do it at a Zoo, in the park, shoot what you know, how you know it. Then you get the results you want... IMO

Cheers

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Sounds advice. Good place to test the new toys

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Meg
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Re: Filters on DSLR

Unread postby Meg » Fri Nov 04, 2005 11:21 pm

Wild@Heart wrote:
I just have a question ... is it still necessary to get a filter for a DSLR and if so what Filter?



Undoubtedly you want to get a polarising filter for those lovely blue skies, and for reflections off water. There are many other sorts which you may want for special situations, but in SA the light is great and a polariser will make all the difference regardless of whether you're shooting film or digital. The other popular one to have for when light is low is a UV filter which reduces glare, but is more commonly used to protect your lens. There is a lot of debate over these filters - it could almost be likened to Canon vs Nikon / Microsoft vs Linux, lol. I think most people who can't afford to smash a lens (like me) would rather use one and be safe, as well as take any glare advantage they give. Other, richer photographers (envy here :wink: ) sometimes say that any extra layer of glass in front of the lens (in particular if you buy a cheap filter!) will degrade the image and so don't use them. Personal choice at the end of the day :) .
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DuQues
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Re: Filters on DSLR

Unread postby DuQues » Fri Nov 04, 2005 11:40 pm

Meg wrote:Other, richer photographers (envy here :wink: ) sometimes say that any extra layer of glass in front of the lens (in particular if you buy a cheap filter!) will degrade the image and so don't use them. Personal choice at the end of the day :) .

Totally correct! Never put "bad" glass in front of your expensive glass! Or behind it either, like teleconverters which are especially degrading to the image quality.

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Re: Filters on DSLR

Unread postby Meg » Fri Nov 04, 2005 11:47 pm

DuQues wrote:
Am I rich now?


Not all filters are made from "bad" glass :wink:
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use sparingly....

Unread postby lecter » Sun Nov 06, 2005 4:15 am

with correct exposures, you can get pleasing results. Filtered effects cannot be remove easily in post processing. Polarisers are nice, though, in many cases, but I advise a shot with and without and decide later.. hehe

On teleconverters, our 1.4x see a lot of action. Degrade the image? Maybe a little, but we still get it. I think this is more important that then the pin sharpest image. Many images I see in magazines reflect this belief.

food for thought anyway..

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Unread postby richardharris » Sun Nov 06, 2005 10:37 am

I have stopped using UV filters as protective elements for my lenses; I just get the impression that even 'pro' versions interfer with the quality.

The only filter I occasionally use is a polariser - thats the only effect impossible to reproduce when processing RAW files. I don't have any but can see that a graduated filter could also be of use.

As for a 1.4 teleconvertor - I suspect its no worse than cropping a photo and losing quality that way

Richard

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Unread postby arks » Sun Nov 06, 2005 6:08 pm

I have always used what's called a "skylight" filter just as extra protection for my lenses. My understanding is that this differs from both UV and polariser lenses and adds nothing but that layer of protection.
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Unread postby richardharris » Sun Nov 06, 2005 11:04 pm

Thats not stictly true if using digital cameras. Skylight filters do have a colour correction for film; not the best for digital, though I suspect the auto-colour balance will compensate.

If you do want to use a filter purely for protection when using digital equipment go for a UV filter.

Richard

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Re: Filters on DSLR

Unread postby Salva » Sun Nov 06, 2005 11:33 pm

DuQues wrote:Totally correct! Never put "bad" glass in front of your expensive glass! Or behind it either, like teleconverters which are especially degrading to the image quality.

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On my last safari, my Nikon 1.4 II Teleconverter was in action the whole 7 days. With great results.
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Unread postby Wild@Heart » Mon Nov 07, 2005 6:47 am

Thanks all ...

My Christmas wishlist

1. Neutral Density Filters
2. Polariser Filters
3. UV Filters

.... not in specific order ... :lol:
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Filters & Hoods

Unread postby Wild@Heart » Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:30 am

Hi all ....

I have a little question ... I recently acquired a nice Circ. Pol. I took some photo's with it the other day and boy it came out dark :redface:

I know your best results is achieved at a 90 degree angle too the sun ... but I still don't quite understand when to use it ...

So .. can anyone explain to me ...

1. When do you actually use the Circ. Pol?
2. How would I know my photo won't come out too dark? I know you can turn the Pol to allow more light? but I can't see the diffs...

Thanks for the assistance ...
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Unread postby Shidzidzii » Tue Jan 24, 2006 8:00 am

I am not an expert but I also have one so here are my experiences .

1 Turn the filter (when you remember) for minimum darkness - this will still polarize the shine off whatever and you will only lose one f stop .

2 Mainly use it when there is very bright sun and shiny objects like water splashing etc. It is very effective when deep sea fishing ( TAG AND RELEASE PRACTITIONER ).

3 It does help to reduce haze effect (like sunglasses do) - probably beter than a daylight UV filter would .

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Unread postby bucky » Tue Jan 24, 2006 10:28 am

Your camera should still take the photo at the correct exposure , you will just have to be a little more careful of shake when using it .

It works best at an angle to the sun , but can work in any direction .

To work it -
1 - Focus on your subject
2 - turn polarizer until you get desired result , make sure you don't turn your focus , or else when you refocus , the polarizer will turn and you will not get the result you wanted (For lenses where the front ring turns at focus)
3 - The darker your image through the viewfinder , the more enhanced your polarizing effect will come out in your picture.
When it is turned so that things are brightest , it acts more like a neutral density , and you will have very little polarization effect.
Even though it looks dark in the viewfinder , it should come out properly exposed in your pic.
4 - The most important thing to note , is that the polarizer is great for using during the day , it is not really a tool to be used often in the early morning or late afternoon , as it hogs to much light , between 1 and 3 stops depending on the conditions.


TIPS -

1 - Use it for scenery pics , or pics of herds of animals where there are clouds and/or blue sky , use it to enhance the clouds , normally when you turn it till the sky looks darkest (This will also make the blue sky super blue) .The biggest thing to be careful of when doing this is that 1 side of your pictures sky is very dark , and the others is light.
2 - as for above , it can also be used to reduce the amount of contrast between the sky , and your ground subject making it easier not to wash out the sky in your pic , due to the skies brightness.
3 - use it when shooting at water . turn it until you remove the glare of the water surface , and it becomes see through .
This is fine for either wide angle or close ups in the water .
4 - always try take a few snaps at various levels of polarization , you can often get a great effect at half way between dark and not , especially when trying to get a bit of an animals reflection in the picture , or where there are slight ripples in the water.
5 - Use it to bring out nice green colours when taking snaps of something where there is lots of green grass
6 - It can help for general photos in bright conditions , or overcast but bright times , to reduce the haze.
7 - If it has been raining , and it clears up , you can get some splendid pics using it when the plants and grass are still wet.
8 - when taking snaps of birds on branches , where the sky is the background , it helps to use maximum polarization to darken the sky behind the bird and thereby getting a much better pic with a blue background ,rather than those whitewashed bird on branch snaps.

Ill try find some pics to illustrate a bit later.

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Unread postby Wild@Heart » Thu Jan 26, 2006 12:45 pm

:redface:

Totally forgot about this topic .. thanks guys for the tips ... I'll try them out this weekend..
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delboysafa
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Circ. Polarising Filter

Unread postby delboysafa » Thu Aug 17, 2006 7:55 am

I am looking for a 77mm CPolarising Filter for my 100-400mm L. Anyone recommend the best one's, price etc

There seems to be a few 'digital' CPolarising Filters around, Do they really make that much difference over the 'film' one's.

Thanks


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