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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 9:50 pm 
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:doh: I think that is a bit of guess work! :wink:

I haven't heard any explanation for that, though I have regularly seen it.

I think that it is much more likely to be some kind of interaction between the muscles.

But that is also guess work. :roll:

So maybe the correct answer here is ... we don't know! :hmz:

But let me contact someone who may know ... (this may take a week or so.)

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 9:57 pm 
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Hi Jaap, me again…

Icw the Cassia abbreviate… same applies as with the baobab… this tree is also deciduous i.e. leaves fall off at maturity or tend to fall off (deriving from the Latin word decidere, to fall off) and is typically used in reference to trees or shrubs that lose their leaves seasonally and to the shedding of other plant structures such as petals after flowering or fruit when ripe. In a more specific sense deciduous means the dropping of a part that is no longer needed, or falling away after its purpose is finished. In plants it is the result of natural processes.

I have found that pollinators of this tree are fruit bats, bees, other insects and rodents. Various birds from our indigenous parrot species to the Go-away Bird eat the fruit pulp and seeds.

Hi Imberbe, you are spot on... I was guessing! :thumbs_up:

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 5:46 am 
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WRT the giraffe, maybe it is just like a dog - they don't like having a wet muzzle?

Interesting fact I found when looking through for this regarding the splayed legs of the giraffe. Most people assume that this is because of their height but I found that okapi drink the same way - which suggests that it is a family function. That sort of blew me away a bit :big_eyes:

WRT to the sjambok pod tree - seems that they flower at about the same time as leaves appear. This does seem to happen with numerous decidous trees, plum etc. so maybe it is just the way they work.

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“ Every year elephants were becoming scarcer and wilder south of the Zambezi, so that it had become impossible to make a living by hunting at all. ” FC Selous 1881


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 7:24 pm 
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Location: Selous Game Reserve - Tanzania
Hello Formites.
How are you? Here is Furahini, guides of selous. I would like to use this opportunity to thank you all FORMITES. YOU ARE GREAT :clap: You answered all the questions, Thank you. Then, I have to present another question to you.
Its about a Marabou stork.
Many times I have seen the marabou storks with white legs. o...k
I have tried to find the reasons, some people are saying that they surforcate on their legs thats why the legs are white in colour.
my question is,
no1.
Is it true that they surfocate on their legs?
no2.
What is the reasons of doing that?

Thank you very much. (Imberbe, Siobain, Timepilot, Elzet, Boorgatspook, & all Formites)
Best regards,
Furahini-guides of selous


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 8:02 pm 
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Hello Furahini, Guide of Selous... Welcome back to the Forum. I salute you.

Appearance

Leptoptilos crumeniferus (Marabou Stork) have long black legs. Like the Turkey Vulture, the Marabou Stork defecates upon its legs and feet. It is known that the Turkey Vulture has strong antiseptic properties in their whitewash and indeed this is also the case with the Marabou stork, however their reasons for carrying out this act are different. Quite simply, it helps assist in regulating body temperature, and also gives the false appearance that the birds have lovely white legs.

I hope this answers your question.

Warmest regards to all guides and Jaap

Elzet

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 10:07 pm 
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Hi Furahini, very interesting question. :D

Yes I completely agree with Elzet on this...

As the storks legs are not protected by feathers, heat is easily
absorbed or lost through the bare legs. It is thought this is why they
urinate causing a cooling through evaporation which helps to cool
the blood in the body, and then forming a protective layer over the legs.
The correct name for this process is 'urohydrosis'.

Another stork that does this is the Saddle-billed stork, and one that
doesn't is the Abdim's stork.

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 6:16 pm 
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Hi,
Just a quick reply. I just checked back in after a while in the bush..
Will try to reply properly tomorrow..
Just been reading the questions and answers... Suforcate... :hmz:

Just received "Beat about the bush - Birds"!! What a flippin nice book! It discribes the Stork behaviour as well!

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 6:28 pm 
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It is a great book Jaap, given me a lot of reading pleasure. :thumbs_up:

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 9:14 pm 
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Hi Jaap

So nice to see you around again. Yes, apart from delivering babies, the stork is quite an interesting bird! :wink: :thumbs_up:

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 10:31 am 
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Thanks for mentioning the new threads Elzet :D I'll ask Imberbe to close them.

Guides of Selous wrote:
Hi Forumites, my name is Fanuel, one of the guides of Selous, thanks for your cooperation.

Today I have a question, which is
What is the difference between Locust and Grasshopper?
Regards, Fanuel



DuQues wrote:
Hi and welcome Fanuel and colleagues!

There is no taxonomic difference between locust and grasshopper species.
In English the term "locust" is used for notorious species that change morphologically and behaviourally on crowding, to form swarms or, when immature, hopper bands.

Swarming behaviour is a response to overcrowding. Increased tactile stimulation of the hind legs causes an increase in levels of serotonin. This causes the locust to change color, eat much more, and breed much more easily. The transformation of the locust to the swarming variety is induced by several contacts with other grasshoppers per minute over a four-hour period.




Siobain wrote:
Hi Fanuel and friends,

As DuQues has said, the locust and grasshopper are from the same family.

When there have been good rains there is a boost in egg laying and
the population of the locusts increases dramatically. When there is no
rain and the food becomes less and less, the locusts seem to all group
together where the food is. This shortage of food causes an increase in
a chemical called serotonin in the insects' nervous system, they start to
change colour and become much stronger, this enables them to travel
much longer distances, and swarming begins.

I suppose you could say a locust is a hungry grasshopper looking for more
food.

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Watching the slow flow of the river. A continues movement of water down towards the ocean. Like blood flowing through a vein, keeping the body alive.


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 10:44 am 
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Guides of Selous wrote:
Hello Forumites,how you doing?Thank for your lovely interpretations,here is my new question: After how long do the umbrical cord(String)dettach from a baby(A new born)Giraffe? Greetings to you all, Oscar



Siobain wrote:
Hi Oscar, nice to talk to you again.

I would imagine the umbilical cord on a baby giraffe would take about
the same time as a human baby's does, anything from 1-3 weeks, until
it has dried out completely and the body at the navel has healed completely.



Timepilot wrote:
Jambo Oscar

I spoke to a zoo keeper friend of mine here who is involved with the giraffes and he said that when their last giraffe calf was born the mother cleaned the calf after the birth which included removing the umbilical cord. He said that was the second time he had seen it so he assumed that this was what would happen in the wild as well.

Hope this helps

TP


:thumbs_up:
(here we do regularly see that the umbilical is still attached after birth and becomes black in colour)

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Watching the slow flow of the river. A continues movement of water down towards the ocean. Like blood flowing through a vein, keeping the body alive.


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 9:14 am 
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Quote:
(here we do regularly see that the umbilical is still attached after birth and becomes black in colour)


If that is the case, about 1 week seems to be the norm for an animal to lose its umbilical, (comes from one of the guys I work with whose a partime farmer :wink: )

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“ Every year elephants were becoming scarcer and wilder south of the Zambezi, so that it had become impossible to make a living by hunting at all. ” FC Selous 1881


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 6:26 pm 
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Location: Tanzania, Selous Game Reserve
Hi Elzet,
Thanks for the info on the Cassia abbreviata.

Regarding the giraffe shaking its head:
I have heared the storie with blood pressure and that valves have to open after drinking. They have to shake their heads to open up valves etc. But that sounds like a far shot.

Looking at the behaviour it seems to me that they just empty their mouth of remaining water which they did not swallow after lifting their head.

Timepilot wrote:
WRT the giraffe, maybe it is just like a dog - they don't like having a wet muzzle?

Interesting fact I found when looking through for this regarding the splayed legs of the giraffe. Most people assume that this is because of their height but I found that okapi drink the same way - which suggests that it is a family function. That sort of blew me away a bit

The okapi is doing the same? what is the ratio of his neck and leg lenght?
I thought the giraffe had to splay its legs because the neck is to short. Might that be possible in the okapi?

The trees might just work that way.. but why? Normally there should be a reason right? Like flowers need to be good visible and easy to get to. The leaves will have to come shortly after to help providing the new growing fruit/seeds with 'food'.

@DuQues and Siobain,
Thanks for the explanation of the grasshopper/locust question!
Tried to find it but had no luck so far! Interesting info!

@TP and Siobain,
Thanks for your help on the umbilical cord question.
According to my collegue here in camp (Marleen) it is normal in human babies for the umbilical cord to come off in 5-8 days.
So this might be the same in all mammals?!

Many thanks for all your help!!!! :thumbs_up: :thumbs_up:

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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 6:37 pm 
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Location: Selous Game Reserve - Tanzania
Jambo Formites
Its my pleasure to be here for my first time. Iam Erick one of the Guide of Selous.
Here is my question.
What are the uses of coloration on Animals?

Thanks a lot.


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 Post subject: Re: Guides of Selous
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 8:28 pm 
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Hi Eric, nice to talk to you. :D

There are many uses for colouration in animals. With certain insects and
reptiles bright colours could mean that they are poisonous, so it is a warning.

Birds change colour in the breeding season to attract a mate, and in most
animals it is for camouflage, used as protection from predators so that they
blend in with their surroundings and are not so easily seen.

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