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 Post subject: Warthog
Unread postPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 9:54 am 
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Warthog babies would eat their mother's droppings so that they can take in the very important rumen bacteria.

Is this bacteria to help them digest their food?

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Unread postPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 10:07 am 
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yup it sure is. its like interflora for herbivores. There isnt really any other way for them to charge their guts with the necessary bacteria. i for one am truly grateful to not have to follow that particular method of populating my gut fauna.


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Unread postPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 10:10 am 
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I should imagine most babies do this. Foals start doing this within a few days. I think it also helps the digestive system to get going with other things other then milk. At least the food is digested already.

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Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2005 7:50 pm 
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Warthogs breed in the summer rainy seasons in the southern parts of Africa. They could have between 1 to 8 pigets( average being 2-3 piglets) weighing 450-900g each. They are born after a gestation period of 160-170 days. Each piglet is alocated to its own teat and is not allowed to suckle from another.


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Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2005 1:36 pm 
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Noticed on my last visit, no little warthog.
In terms of maximising on droppings, hares might be the most efficient. They use their droppings as vitamin pills. The most cost effective way of recycling nutrition.

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Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2005 9:15 pm 
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I was told by a ranger in Kruger that warthogs drastically reduce reproduction in times of drought, that's apparently the reason for so few babies being spotted in the last few years.


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Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 22, 2005 1:27 pm 
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I kruger this January, CUTE little piglets were roaming around with there mothers every were. I got a few good pics of them!


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Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 22, 2005 4:28 pm 
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DID YOU KNOW??
That warthogs were named because of there wart-like markings on there face, there are two of these 'warts' just under there eyes. The 'warts' are used to mark territory, by wiping them on vegitation and other objects in there home range.


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Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2005 6:07 pm 
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This has been the first time I have been to Kruger and no little antennae running through the veldt.
My smallest sighting was a big mamma :cry:

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Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2005 6:15 pm 
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macho mouse wrote:
This has been the first time I have been to Kruger and no little antennae running through the veldt.
My smallest sighting was a big mamma :cry:


I agree with you, I saw extremely few warthog in genaral in August, I'm used to seeing lots!


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Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2005 6:32 pm 
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We stopped for a very long time and watched a lone male. That is not my usual experience. He was not alerted to the needs of his young, so he was just not interested in any potential threat.
I have also never seen the park so dry.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2005 6:41 pm 
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macho mouse wrote:
We stopped for a very long time and watched a lone male. That is not my usual experience. He was not alerted to the needs of his young, so he was just not interested in any potential threat.
I have also never seen the park so dry.


Ar'n't warthog also a favourite food of leopard? I wonder if they are feeling the decline in their food choice?

This weather is freaky, I've never been so cold in October :shock:


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Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2005 6:49 pm 
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It would be good to hear from people experienced in patterns in the park.
One of our rangers told us that the predators do well during early drought, as the prey were often weakened by lack of food and water.
This was my worst experience of the park, but maybe I have been lucky in the past.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 9:57 pm 
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leopardspotter wrote:
.....there are two of these 'warts' just under there eyes.


The two warts mentioned above are clearly visible in this photo
Image

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 2:15 am 
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That is a useful picture Jazil. That is a female warthog as males have two pairs of 'warts' on the sides of the head compared to a female's one pair, which is relatively small (as in picture).

The picture is useful because you can see the dark discolouration or 'tears' running down from the eye.

Warthogs have two major types of facial glands, the tusk gland located in the upper lid behind the tusks, and the preorbital gland. Which is found near the inside of the eyes (as in the picture).

The tusk gland secretion is found to be involved in warthog courtship and territory marking with the preorbital gland. Another function of the tusk gland includes communicating status.This is particularly key to warthogs since males are solitary and live with one or more females in which their home ranges overlap.

The height of scent and tusk scrape marks could provide clues to the largest most dominant males in the area.

Rubbing together of preorbital glands is a means of communication between individuals and important in the courtship display between prospective mates.

The location of this gland is not near the enlarged warts and the warts are dermal and do not contain glands. Its believed that because males have larger and more numerous growths, that they evolved to protect the eyes and jaw from sparring contests with other males during dominance battles and practice. Contests of strength are usually tusk-to-tusk and forehead-to-forehead pushing matches. Low sideways blows are wicked and violent fights are bloody, though it usually doesnt come down to that. The mouth is usually kept closed during ritualized heirarchy sparring, with the upper and lower tusks clamped together. Warts offer protection from this potential damage.

Warthogs have no sweat glands, theres a fact u coulda used. and like elephants are usually left or right 'handed/tusked' and use one more than the other wearing it down.


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