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Unread postPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 7:12 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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 Post subject: Re: Puff adder
Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:34 pm 
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Mfezi wrote:
Hi Ludwig
Nice photos!! Where did you see this Puffy?? Was it still alive?? I almost get the idea that it may be dead??
Mfezi

Hello Mfezi,
I saw it between Pretoriuskop and Skukuza.
Here is the link to the story:

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:00 am 
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Quote:
they aren't venomous when they are shedding


:shock: Hi Woodlin, that is not true at all. They are poisonous, but apart from that, snakes overall are very irritable when shedding skin. Your hubby is very lucky to not have been bitten cause the Puffadder makes for a nasty & potentially fatal bite.


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Unread postPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 11:23 am 
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Woodlin, I agree 100% with what Scipio has said. One must bear in mind that if the type of snake that is under discussion is known to be a venomous specie, it will always be venomous. No matter what the snake is doing or not doing.

Venomous snakes' babies are born / hatched with a fully equipped venom apparatus, fangs and venom and it stays in working condition until the day that they die.

Your husband is indeed lucky that he got so close to the snake with out being bitten. Who knows, another movement might have just triggered the snake to strike. It also just shows you how well their camouflage is that your husband got so close without seeing the snake and that the snake had to hiss to warn your husband. On the other hand it also shows that snakes will not just strike at any object indiscriminately. Remember that one reason for snakes striking is when they feel endangered.

Hope this helps.

Mfezi


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 12:46 am 
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wildtuinman wrote:
I have two questions:

1.) Apparently they only bite when you step ON and not NEXT to it. Is this true?

2.) I also want to query something else. I am not so sure that a puffadder can be called deadly. Yes, I agree that you will have a chance of turning your toes skywards with the complications of gangrene and the effects of (anaphylactic?) shock, but I am not that convinced that you will die easily from a puffadder bite.

What do the experts say?


Hi, I'm no expert but I'll try and respond.

1)Bill Branch, in his work Field Guide to Snakes and other Reptiles of Southern Africa, mentions that the Puff Adder strikes readily which leads me to believe that it will strike if you get close enough for it to feel threatened and not only if you step on it.

2)In the same work he says that bites are common but fatalities rare so you seem to be correct there.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 4:49 pm 
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Just thought I would add this. Handling puff adder double hook method, spreading the weight. Female from WCNP.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 4:59 pm 
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And this is where we found her in WCNP, 3m up a tree - puff adders climb very well>

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 Post subject: Re: Identification help: Snakes
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2008 6:30 pm 
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Hello, I spotted this snake crossing the road in southern Kruger during June 2007:
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Click through for larger versions on Flickr.

I looked through some photos, but haven't found a good match. Would you help, please?

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 Post subject: Re: Pufadder Monster!
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2008 3:35 pm 
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And if you would like to observe the animal up close, this would be the way to go!


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 Post subject: Re: Snakes: Puffadder
Unread postPosted: Thu May 14, 2009 4:00 pm 
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are these snakes "mating"? would "mating" be the correct term when snakes are "reproducing"? and is it possible to determine (by colour, length or position) which is the female and which the male? and is it true that puff adders sometimes bite humans without injecting any venom, simply to save for occasions when they can make better use of it (kill prey)?

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thanks


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 Post subject: Re: Snakes: Puffadder
Unread postPosted: Fri May 15, 2009 12:47 am 
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There is much colouration difference between Pufadders, so colouration is not an indication of sex. Male snakes often have longer tails than the females, and also exhibit a marked thickening around the cloacal area.

This may indeed be a pair mating .... but it may also have been two males busy fighting. Snakes do not bite when fighting (it could be rather dangerous) they rather wrestle each other.

And yes, it is true that snakes will at times deliver a "dry bite". This is intended as a warning and preserves the venom, which is "expensive" to produce and important for survival.

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 Post subject: Re: Snakes: Puffadder
Unread postPosted: Fri May 15, 2009 8:21 am 
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I think those are two ,males in combat as its said.
Probably will find there was a female near by.


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 Post subject: Re: Snakes: Puffadder
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 10:48 am 
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Two nice Puffadder pics from our recent trip to KTP:

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 Post subject: Re: Snakes: Puffadder
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 26, 2009 3:46 pm 
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As regards puffadders striking readily :
I was third in the line after the ranger & tracker on a wilderness trail in southern KNP on a cool day with thick vegetation underfoot .
I was fortunate to look down before possibly putting my foot on a large puffadder that was silently slithering away from the threat posed by the first 2 in the queue , so was possibly lucky that it was a cool day and the snake was perhaps less active .

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 Post subject: Re: Identification help: Snakes
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 21, 2009 5:34 pm 
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Location: Germany (Bühl) - but dreaming of Africa!
could somebody please help me with the ID?
it was at the stairs up to Cape Point...
a very small snake - maybe a baby? :hmz:
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Thanks!

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