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Korhaan: Red-crested Korhaan

Identify and index birds in Southern Africa

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wildtuinman
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Red-crested korhaan

Unread postby wildtuinman » Tue May 31, 2005 7:27 am

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Saw 2 different sightings in 2 days. The Afsaal area seems to be a great habitat for them. I saw one earlier this year on the S114.
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Unread postby richardharris » Tue Sep 20, 2005 9:57 am

Love to watch the two species of korhaan. Both make the most amazing noise which is fascinating to watch.

Have only once seen the redcrested do its awesome mating ritual of a vertical flight 30 meters into the air and then tumble down as if shot.

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Unread postby Jakkalsbessie » Tue Sep 20, 2005 1:36 pm

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Unread postby Elsa » Sun Mar 19, 2006 6:41 pm

Another one seen last year in the park.

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Unread postby WELSH_ASH » Mon Mar 20, 2006 10:53 am

Snapped this one on March 2003 visit. Sorry about the poor quality.

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Unread postby leopardspotter » Mon Mar 27, 2006 8:53 pm

Here is a photo of one we saw January this year, really enjoy listening to them singing.

Very lucky for you to see the mating ritual richard, would of loved to see that! :)

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Unread postby Jose » Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:38 pm

Red-crested Korhaan (Lophotis ruficrista [Eupodotis ruficrista])

Classification:
Order: Gruiformes
Family: Otididae
Genus: Lophotis

Other names:
Afrikaans: Boskorhaan
French: Outarde houppette, Outarde à huppe rouge
German: Rotschopftrappe
Dutch: Zuid-Afrikaanse kuiftrap
Portuguese: Abetarda-de-poupa

The Red-crested Korhaan is a fairly large (50 cm) bird. The red crest that gives it its name is rarely seen unless you are observing a displaying male, in which case the elongated rufous feathers are erected to form a crest resembling that of the Grey Crowned Crane. Apart from this crest the male also has a bluish neck. The female has a mottled brown crown and neck and is less colourful with more white on the breast than the male. Both sexes have a black belly. Juveniles resemble the female.
Red-crested Korhaan can be confused with the female Northern Black Korhaan but is distinguished by the chevron-shaped markings (not barring) on the back.
It can fly but prefers to stay on the ground. They run better than they fly, and they hide better than they run: their camouflage allows them to completely blend into the background of the dense bushveld they prefer. This makes the bird not easy to spot despite being fairly common and widespread.

During the spring mating season the male of the Red-crested Korhaan performs a fascinating courtship display that starts off with a rapid vertical flight after which the wings are closed before it tumbles straight back to the ground. It normally lands quite professionally but crash landings have been reported. :wink:

They feed on any insects or small animals they can find, although they also have a distinct liking for plant fruits and seeds.

Some authorities consider the northern subspecies L. r. gindiana to be a separate species: L. gindiana; (Somali) Buff-crested Bustard.

Habitat: Dry woodland, semi-desert grassland, and thornveld.

Breeding: Like all bustards and korhaans, they are ground nesters and hide their nest very, very well. Eggs and chicks are extremely rare to find. Clutches vary from 1 - 5 eggs, incubated by the female.

Sound: The male's protracted call is a characteristic sound of the bushveld in summer. It starts with a series of clicks, "tic-tic-tic", building into an extended series of loud piping whistles, "pi-pi-pi... pipity-pipity". When you hear this call (for me personally the second half of the afternoon in spring, early summer has always been a good time), start looking in the general direction of the sound. Don't even bother to try and find the bird in the grass or the bushes but just keep looking. With a little luck you will see it fly up and perform its stunt dive.

Status: Common resident.

Threats: Not globally threatened. In certain areas of sub-Sahara Africa, however, localised effects of loss of habitat are showing:
<...>a major tourist destination, and most come to view elephants. To make sure they do, ground water is mechanically pumped to attract animals throughout the year. There are now elephants in their tens of thousands beyond the natural carrying capacity of the park.

The vegetation around the waterholes becomes degraded from trampling and grassland is replaced with acacia woodland. As a result, species like the Crowned Crane are becoming increasingly rare. Even Guineafowl, Red-crested Korhaan and Saddle-billed Storks are suffering, while common species like the Lilac-breasted Roller and Pied Babbler are becoming increasingly common as acacia woodland expands.<...>

    Source (Scroll down to Report on the Meeting of 14 October 1998.)

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Korhaan: Red-crested Korhaan

Unread postby lepus » Sat Jun 10, 2006 9:20 pm

Would need some suggestions for this koorhan female. Not a very good pic, I know. Black bellied?

Pic taken in Kruger somewhere north of Skukuza and south of Letaba (if my memory serves me right)


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Unread postby Katja » Sat Jun 10, 2006 10:25 pm

Difficult to say. But I think I can see some white on the back, so my guess is redcrested.
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Unread postby leopardspotter » Sat Jun 10, 2006 11:47 pm

Agree with you Katja, Redcrested Koraan.
There are many shades of colours on the back wings of this bird, compared to the Black Bellied which mainly has dark and light brown feathers (dark brown 'speckels').

You must of been driving extra slow to see it in such a camouflage environment!

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Unread postby Mgoddard » Tue Jun 03, 2008 1:08 pm

Can we confirm if this is a Northen Black , Red Crested or Black Bellied Bustard Korhaan :? .... and I think it is a female? Once again my Sasol guide does not show Northern Black appearing in Kruger??? Seen on the S36 in April

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Once again I thank you for all the help :D

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wildtuinman
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Unread postby wildtuinman » Tue Jun 03, 2008 1:25 pm

The black belly rules out the female Black-Bellied Bustard/Korhaan.

The lack of white cheek rules out the male.

I would say Red-Crested Korhaan, but would like to have a look at at bigger picture, if you can, MG.

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wildtuinman
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Unread postby wildtuinman » Tue Jun 03, 2008 1:33 pm

Nope, your guide is correct, Northern Black Korhaan does not occur in Kruger.

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Unread postby wildtuinman » Tue Jun 03, 2008 2:32 pm

Yip, Red-Crested, male. The female is duller.

The lack of white cheek is the easiest way to distinguish it from male Black-Bellied Bustard. The female Black-Bellied Bustard does not have a black belly. :wink:

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Re: Korhaan: Red-crested Korhaan

Unread postby Yolandé Oelsen » Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:56 pm

Have seen a few of these on the Transport dam road last week ( and one killed on the Pretoriuskop - Skukuza road - by a car)

Love to watch the beak snapping first and then listen to their call!
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