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Unread postPosted: Sun May 25, 2008 9:01 am 
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Hi Batmad. Birding is totally addictive! And when you start out it can be quite frustrating . I suggest jou find a bird club in your area and go out on their monthly walks. ( Birdlife SA usually have details of the bird clubs) You learn a lot from these people. You don't say where you live, but if you are in JHB area I can pm you the details of the club I belong to and the details of an excellent beginners birding course I did a couple of years ago. It really helpd me a lot

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Unread postPosted: Sat May 31, 2008 6:35 am 
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On my last trip I used a combination of "Roberts Bird Guide" and "Best Birding in Kruger".
For a novice, it made birding so much easier, what a treat.
I am, however, going to get myself a good book on raptors.
Although "Best Birding in Kruger" has a section on raptors, it is not comprehensive enough when it comes to juveniles.

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Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2008 8:22 pm 
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Is there any old hand at birding that uses the new Roberts field guide and find it confusing?

I am trying to make sense out of their ordering of species and similar birds and have found the book difficult in the field. Examples are the warblers with most on pages 248-254, but then there are some on 272 and 260. All the flycatchers are together except one that is placed with the shrikes, but has no similarities with the shrikes on that page.

The information in the book is great and far better than my old Newmans, but I have resorted back to my battered Newmans as I find it easier to use.


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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 12:38 pm 
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I have always preferred Newmans to ID the bird, then find it in Roberts to confirm and get more info. So I'm in the same situation as you :?

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 12:48 pm 
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For me, Sasol is still king, maybe just because I've been using it for so long. I always take Roberts along for more info but not the latest one, the car will be overloaded even before I pack.
(Shheezzz, did you see the size of that book! It should be sold on a trolley!)

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 1:34 pm 
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JenB you are thinking of" Roberts The text book" There is a field guide out now that is the sise of Newmans or Sasol. Its great, and is very informative, but I still prefer my Newmans. I think it comes down to what you are used to

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 9:16 am 
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I have just purchased "The Birdguide of Southern Africa" by Ulrich Oberprieler and Burger Cillie. The pictures of each bird are generally very good and clear, and it is certainly an valued addition to my bird book collection when trying to id these little creatures.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 5:23 pm 
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even though roberts might be a bit confusing the pics are awsome and the information to. if you look at the begginig there is a quik index so you can look for the species and then turn to that species's page and from there on find the bird you are looking for. it also has the new names and gives you a explanation on what the nest looks like.

i still say its the best and will recomend it to everyone.


all the best
Batmad :mrgreen:

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Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 10:13 am 
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Batmad, I agree with you that the index in the front cover is handy, but even in this there are some omissions where i had to look up the bird in the index in the back (and this you can only do if you know your birds well, and know what you are looking for.)

Nope, I will continue using my Newmans, but will have to track down a newer copy as mine is falling apart.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 10:19 am 
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I must say that I have found that one must have at least 2 reference guides to work from. I use SASOL III most of the time but also own Roberts' field guide and my SO uses Newman's. I have a raptor specific guide and also use Roberts' software and internet references.

All guides have "gaps" which can be filled with the other references.

This to me is the only way I sometimes manage to id a specific tricky bird.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 2:19 pm 
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As I said before, it comes down to what you are used to. But I agree with WTM. All guides have gaps or pictures that are not the best so a 2nd book is useful, I don't think any of the ones mentioned here are bad at all, just personal preferences

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Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 5:23 pm 
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i have purchased a book for R10 from a charity shop! it is basically a newmans bird guide but for kruger! i think it is out of print because it was puplished in 1994. :wink:

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Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 7:08 pm 
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Thats a great one Batmad. I also bought mine at a 2nd hand shop and its very useful in the lowveld :D

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 Post subject: Re: Fieldguide: BIRDS
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 1:37 pm 
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viewtopic.php?f=32&t=24950

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 Post subject: Re:
Unread postPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2008 10:30 am 
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johnd wrote:
Got the new Roberts field guide the other day (in anticipation for birding day!!) and so far I've been very impressed, it's very cheap compared to some of the other guides and the information for each species is top notch, the thing that made me buy this book is the distribution maps which are better than any other field guide currently available.

I've got very few complaints, I do find it strange that there is no illustration of an Ostrich and although this is not too important to me, it still seems a little odd, the main thing though is that the quality of the paintings vary widely, some are extremely good and others are, well, a little off the mark. The raptor illustrations are some of the best if not the best out there, but luckily 90% of the images are of a high standard.

As for the nightjar page, that is going to be very handy for birding day, many people don't realise how easy they are to catch with the use of a spotlight (and how wide they can open their mouthes!!) and in these situations it really does turn I.D'ing these birds into a 30 second opperation! And as for some of the above comments, I don't believe you can tick a dead bird, that would be like ticking a bird in a cage.

My vote for this book...get it and add it to the collection, you won't regret it!



GP? Is this what you looked for?

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