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Re: Kids/Babies in Kruger NP info.

Discuss and find information on the Kruger National Park
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DuQues
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Unread postby DuQues » Fri May 18, 2007 12:02 pm

Uffer Marcolongo, president of the International Association for Medical Assistance to Travellers, is vociferous in her objection to giving Mefloquine to children. She said she would be "quite reluctant" to give Mefloquine to children under 10, adding that her organization was financing a study on the effects of the drug. In the meantime, her advice is to avoid recreational travel to malarious areas with children.

WHAT these experts do agree on is that medical prophylaxis is only one piece of the prevention picture. Measures such as wearing long-sleeved clothing, applying pediatric insect repellent with 6-10 percent DEET (with care to avoid scraped or otherwise sensitive skin), sleeping under mosquito netting treated with permethrin, and avoiding nighttime exposure are every bit as important as taking any of the drugs.

I would not give young children any medicines without a long consult with one or more doctors... Just try to prevent any bites, and if coming home and the child is feverish go to the hospital and see what they do...
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

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acekam
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Unread postby acekam » Fri Jun 15, 2007 9:20 pm

Croc Bridge and Olifants do not have swimming pools, so if that's a priority, then you should look elsewhere.
I think that Berg-en-Dal, Skukuza, Satara and Letaba are well geared towards children, having swimming pools, other in-camp attractions and short but normally rewarding drives\routes around the camp (I can't talk for camps further north as I've never stayed further).

I think those are bigger considerations than north vs south.
The children are really going to get a lot more pleasure from baboons, vervet monkeys and large animals like giraffe and elephant than they are from an abundance of big cats.

Be sure to introduce them to the smaller creatures, particularly within the camps eg. birds, lizards, insects.
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Unread postby Freda » Fri Jun 15, 2007 9:32 pm

I think I read somewhere that the age limit for night drives was 6 years.
I think after a day in the park and all that fresh air they would probably be too tired to really enjoy it, may be wrong here, long time since my kids were that age :wink:
Acekam gave excellent advice about child friendly camps, Berg-en-Dal, Skukuza, Satara and Letaba are well geared towards children, with pools and play areas.
Have a great trip!

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Unread postby BushBabe » Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:25 am

We had worked out sheets with all the mammals we could see, with points allocated to each sighting - like 70 for cheetah, 10 for kudu, 1 for impala. We would begin a new sheet for each drive out and there would be a winner for each day, then the overall winner for the trip. One of the kids can be allocated as scribe, and this keeps focus for a long time!
I can remember first prize was always a magnum icecream - yum!
For the younger boys, taking lego along isa great diversion - get them to build impala, giraffe, lion...?
Have fun.
The natural world is amazing - showing the hand of an awesome God.

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Unread postby restio » Tue Jul 24, 2007 5:48 pm

Here are my tips - what I remember enjoying from my own childhood....

I also used to enjoy paging through bird books to identify birds - probably better for your older kids. Stick to the big ones and bright one at first. LBJs can be a bit frustrating until you've had lots of experience. ;-)

We also liked having a good mammal book in the car, and we'd read out information about each animal as we saw it. Even "boring" animals are actually fascinating at a behavioural level. There are lots of good books suggested in the Recommended Reading section, if you don't have one yet.

My dad and mom stopped for everything! Trees, insects, tortoises, flowers, interesting geological features, tracks in the sand. That definitely livened up our game drives.

We loved getting tick lists from the park of all the stuff you could see, and keeping count of all the different species we'd seen.

If you're going to do a trip report, perhaps you can get your kids fired up about helping, and making a note of which roads you take, what you see, what the weather is like etc.

Make sure that you have enough binocs to go around...
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Unread postby p@m » Wed Jul 25, 2007 9:54 pm

Get the older kids to "navigate" -- give them the map & let them work out routes, distances, how much time it should take, etc. Let each take turns in having a morning or afternoon drive to be in charge of -- only rule -- no arguments from the rest !! Their map-reading skills will improve dramatically ! Just keep it simple to start off with. In areas where there is not much too see (happens sometimes) let them count makes of vehicles seen or colours or vehicles or number plates of where other cars are from.
Have fun !

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Unread postby Elsa » Thu Jul 26, 2007 9:57 am

acekam wrote:Don't forget that all-time favourite :"Who can keep quiet the longest?"


LOL, yes, keep that one for the end of the day when all else has been tried time. :roll: :wink: but in my experience doesn't last for longer than about 10 seconds. :lol:
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UPDATE - we just returned with 4 boys

Unread postby Familyfun » Wed Aug 15, 2007 4:02 am

I just put an update on our trip (just returned) with our 4 boys ages 7, 9, 11, and 12. It was AMAZING!! You'll find it here.
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Kruger and Babies

Unread postby DotDan » Tue Nov 13, 2007 8:16 am

Hi All

Looking for some advice from people who have gone to the kruger with their babies?

I have a 6 month old and we are going to kruger in 2 weeks time, staying in Marloth though.

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Elsa
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Unread postby Elsa » Tue Nov 13, 2007 10:17 am

Hi dotdan and welcome,
I think the biggest by far concern is the Malaria risk.
You will find lots of info and advicehere
Where ever you go, go with all your Heart.

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p@m
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Unread postby p@m » Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:03 am

Hi there dotdan, just make sure you don't drive too far in a day -- babies often snooze in the car and then are raring to go when you are dead tired from being in the car all day !
Lots of fluids for the heat, (means extra nappies !) hat for when you get out at picnic spots, remember the sand can be hot too, so choose where you put them down to crawl - a picnic blanket / tarp comes in handy.
It also helps if you have an area in the car where they can safely crawl around and play too. Enjoy.
Little ones are often fascinated by the birds and animals and are no trouble to travel with.

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restio
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Unread postby restio » Tue Nov 13, 2007 6:04 pm

Hello and welcome, dotdan.

I took my son to Kgalagadi when he was a young toddler. I found that an afternoon game drive was a perfect way of getting him to nap. :lol: He loved seeing the birds and animals.

Having a small supply of toys or other "distraction devices" in the car helps if baby gets bored.

As others have said, malaria is the biggest issue. If you have a camp cot, then take a net to put over it. To keep insects out, we made our son an elasticated net that fitted exactly on to the top of his camp cot.

You can buy special mozzie repellents that are suitable for babies, and that would definitely be worth it.
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Unread postby reinette » Fri Nov 16, 2007 11:24 am

Our youngest was almost 2 the first time we take them to KNP.
What worked for us is, every second day to go out first thing in the morning and do breakfast at a picnic spot, driving most of the day, the next day we will get up later, do breakfast in the camp and do a short midmorning and late afternoon drive.
Think this could work for a 6 month old as well.

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Unread postby Senyetse » Tue Nov 20, 2007 7:42 am

We have a 5 year old daughter and we have been the visiting national parks since she was a small baby.
In Kruger go for the larger camps with swimming pools - there are usually more kids to play with.
All the camps in Kruger have wonderful campsites.
Camping is probably the best way of visiting the parks with kids, they usually find friends to play with.

Other parks with campsites to consider are Addo, Tsitsikamma (both Nature's Valley and Storms River), Mountain Zebra, Karoo and Wilderness.

Keep your game drives short, not more than an hour at a time.
You can purchase activity books in the camp shops to keep the kids busy at camp.
Dec '11 - Storms River
June '12 - Berg-en-Dal

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Kevin M
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Unread postby Kevin M » Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:49 am

Children do not like to spend too much time in the car.
I have 4 children and we are fortunate to be able to visit parks regularly.
In the big five parks we limit our drives to two short drives per day.
One in the morning and another in the evening.
It is worth your while to drive out to a picnic spot to also break the time spent in the car.
Most camps have swimming pools now and with a little bit of imagination you can have a wonderful time with your family during the day in the camps.
Letaba and Skukuza also offer holiday programmes for children which you can take part in depending on whether it is in SA school holidays.
The best parks for children, in my opinion, are the coastal parks as they have far more to offer with fewer restrictions.
Of them all, I would say that Wilderness is probably the most child friendly.
Kevin Moore
Manager: Conservation Interpretation
e-mail: kevinm@sanparks.org


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