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Johann
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Unread postby Johann » Thu May 03, 2007 12:37 pm

Have a look at this list of Fieldguides

I've been using:
Sasol Larger Illustrated Guide To Birds Of Southern Africa
Author(s): Ian Sinclair; Phil Hockey
Publisher: Struik Publishers
ISBN: 1770072438
Published: 2005

Also available in Afrikaans. It is the most updated guide if I'm not mistaken. All the others are getting a bit old. Haven't had a need for any of the others for id in the field. Back at home I might use specific/specialised guides on pipits, waders and raptors.
Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.
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Latest lifers from Kruger NP:
Black Coucal Centropus grillii Swartvleiloerie
Flappet Lark Mirafra rufocinnamomea Laeveldklappertjie

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Unread postby acekam » Thu May 03, 2007 11:39 pm

Cougar, what Newman's shows is a distribution map and the colour indicates whether it is resident all year round or seasonal (usually summer only). I wouldn't know percentages, but can say it is unlikely many of the summer visitors\migrants will have arrived that early.
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Johann
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New Field Guide

Unread postby Johann » Tue Sep 18, 2007 3:24 pm

For those of you who might be looking for a new bird field guide or a gift for the birder in the family: The all new Robert's Field guide (English version) will be available in October. The Afrikaans translation is almost complete and will be available a little bit later. Looking at some of the illustrations and other info it should set a new benchmark for future field guides.

Have a look at this page for more info.

There is also a book in the pipeline with all the regional sub-species and also a new Robert's dedicated to birds of the Kruger Park. :lol:
Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.
Albert Einstein

Latest lifers from Kruger NP:
Black Coucal Centropus grillii Swartvleiloerie
Flappet Lark Mirafra rufocinnamomea Laeveldklappertjie

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Johan van Rensburg
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Unread postby Johan van Rensburg » Wed Sep 19, 2007 12:38 pm

DuQues wrote:That looks like a very good guide, and very cheap as well at R175! 8)

This I find a little.... Especially the last sentence :?
New to the scene of birding in the region is an easy to use nightjar feather identification plate that should give you the tools to correctly ID any adult nightjar in the hand within about 20 seconds! Very handy for road kills.


Sorry that one of the more macabre birding practices upsets you DQ. But it is fact that picking up road-killed nightjars offers the best oppotunity to get to know these very difficult (from an ID-point-of-view) feathered friends better. It is also fact that, for some reason, nightjars are often roadkill victims and many birders, including myself, plan their birding such as to arrive such on roads soon after sunrise when those kills are still fresh and relatively undamaged. As an aside - I have found some kills so fresh that the louseflies were still active in the birds feathers!

This way we develop our own database of ID features that becomes useful in assisting the ID of live birds seen later on in one's birding adventures. I must still collect plenty specimens before my database will become useful. Unfortunately for the nightjars, and fortunately for me, they (the nightjars) continue their suicide mission.
671 Latest lifer: Black coucal

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francoisd
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The Shorebird Guide: a guide to....

Unread postby francoisd » Fri Oct 26, 2007 2:26 pm

I just received my latest purchase from Kalahari.net titled The Shorebird Guide. I saw this book in September when Johann and I went birding as it was lying in his car.

It contains over 300 pages of photos of shorebirds and although the publication's focus is on the shorebirds of North America many do occur in South Africa so the book is quite useful.

The colour photo plates shows the bird in different plumage stages and sometimes also with other bird species of similar size. On the photo page there is a page reference to a section in the back of the book where behaviour, migration, moult etc is discussed.

The book is not much bigger than my SASOL 3rd edition so can easily be taken with on a field visit.

Below a scan of the pages on Curlew Sandpiper

Image

If you consider buying this book through Kalahari.net be aware that they offer two options. One comes from USA and takes 10 working days the other from SA and takes 5 working days. The SA option is however R160 more expensive so rather wait the extra 5 days
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rageltjie
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looking for specific book of birds

Unread postby rageltjie » Fri Oct 26, 2007 11:49 pm

maybe somebody can help me find a book:BIRDS OF THE KRUGER NATIONAL PARK. i would love to own a copy of this book or tell were i can get a copy of the book.

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Freda
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Unread postby Freda » Sat Oct 27, 2007 6:03 am

Hi and welcome, rageltjie :D
The only copies I can find are in USA or UK.
Take a look here

Happy birding!

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richardharris
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Unread postby richardharris » Sat Oct 27, 2007 12:56 pm

Great book, with all the much nicer names!

Its a shame that Newman (or someone else) hasn't brought out an updated version. Its really helpful to have the impossible birds eliminated when trying to identify one.

Richard

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francoisd
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Unread postby francoisd » Mon Oct 29, 2007 8:19 am

richardharris wrote:Great book, with all the much nicer names!

Its a shame that Newman (or someone else) hasn't brought out an updated version. Its really helpful to have the impossible birds eliminated when trying to identify one.

Richard


If you have a look at this page about the new Roberts Fieldguide you'll find the following sentence hidden away under the heading Southern African Guides

No time frames is mentioned but it is being looked at

Preparation of a dedicated Roberts Kruger National Park Bird guide is well underway and so too is the Geographic Variation Guide that will illustrate the various plumage differences of about two thirds of the 900 odd recognised subspecies in the region.
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Unread postby johnd » Thu Nov 08, 2007 12:31 am

Got the new Roberts field guide the other day (in anticipation for birding day!!) and so far I've been very impressed, it's very cheap compared to some of the other guides and the information for each species is top notch, the thing that made me buy this book is the distribution maps which are better than any other field guide currently available.

I've got very few complaints, I do find it strange that there is no illustration of an Ostrich and although this is not too important to me, it still seems a little odd, the main thing though is that the quality of the paintings vary widely, some are extremely good and others are, well, a little off the mark. The raptor illustrations are some of the best if not the best out there, but luckily 90% of the images are of a high standard.

As for the nightjar page, that is going to be very handy for birding day, many people don't realise how easy they are to catch with the use of a spotlight (and how wide they can open their mouthes!!) and in these situations it really does turn I.D'ing these birds into a 30 second opperation! And as for some of the above comments, I don't believe you can tick a dead bird, that would be like ticking a bird in a cage.

My vote for this book...get it and add it to the collection, you won't regret it!

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Newmans Bird Book - Kruger Park

Unread postby 50something » Fri Nov 09, 2007 11:07 am

I have a very well used edition of Newmans "Birds of the Kruger Park". As it is falling apart I would like to replace it but don't seem to be able to locate it in any of the book-stores in Cape Town. Is it still available?

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DuQues
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Unread postby DuQues » Fri Nov 09, 2007 11:15 am

Have a look here. Amazon has it as well.
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c

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Johann
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Unread postby Johann » Fri Nov 09, 2007 3:15 pm

If I was you I would maybe hang on a bit. There is a new guide coming out for Kruger in the near future.

Quote from BirdInfo website:
...Preparation of a dedicated Roberts Kruger National Park Bird guide is well underway and so too is the Geographic Variation Guide that will illustrate the various plumage differences of about two thirds of the 900 odd recognised subspecies in the region...


Unfortunately I can't tell you that it will be as good as the Newmans but maybe just worth to wait a few months. My Kruger Newmans is also falling apart and I'm waiting to see what the Roberts KNP guide will look like before I start searching for a replacement. I'm just hoping that they will be including the same kind of info (ie specific records for rarities etc) as the Newmans currently have.
Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.
Albert Einstein

Latest lifers from Kruger NP:
Black Coucal Centropus grillii Swartvleiloerie
Flappet Lark Mirafra rufocinnamomea Laeveldklappertjie

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Freda
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Re: Newmans Bird Book - Kruger Park

Unread postby Freda » Fri Nov 09, 2007 5:29 pm

50something wrote:I have a very well used edition of Newmans "Birds of the Kruger Park". As it is falling apart I would like to replace it but don't seem to be able to locate it in any of the book-stores in Cape Town. Is it still available?

I love my Green Edition but it is also falling apart, I got an almost new one from here and I am so pleased with it :D
Still use my old one though :wink:

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Unread postby Imberbe » Mon Nov 19, 2007 12:02 am

Got a mail from the author. The Afrikaans version has been delayed due to problems with the translator. Will only be available in 2009! :cry: A real pity!
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