Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 7 of 35
 [ 513 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ... 35  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 3:47 am 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2004 12:12 pm
Posts: 749
Location: Lowvelder in Brisbane
Wow Johan, that's cool! I should get a chance to try this very soon considering how many mozzies are about :twisted:

I wonder if that means they always bite an artery rather than a vein so that the pressure from our own heart pumping keeps filling them up? Pity this is a family site, there are a number of expletives which come to mind when thinking about mozzies :x

_________________
Mothers hold their children's hands for a while and their hearts forever


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:05 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Sighting of the Year - Birds (2013)
Joined: Wed Sep 06, 2006 3:33 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: I'm the patty in Jam Street
Award: Birder of the Year (2012)
Meg wrote:
...wonder if that means they always bite an artery rather than a vein so that the pressure from our own heart pumping keeps filling them up?


Arteries run deeper in the body than veins. It is therefore unlikely that the mozzie will "mainline".

Only female mosquitoes bite. They are attracted by several things, including heat (infrared light), light, perspiration, body odour, lactic acid and carbon dioxide. The female lands on your skin and sticks her proboscis into you (the proboscis is very sharp and thin, so you may not feel it going in). A simple way to describe the proboscis: it consists of a tube bundle inside a straw. Some of the tubes deliver her saliva that contains proteins (anticoagulants) to prevent your blood from clotting. She sucks your blood into her abdomen, about 5 microliters per serving, through another tube dedicated to that function. The sucking mechanism is continuous and can only be interrupted by the mozzie pulling out her proboscis.

If the mozzie is disturbed during her meal, she will fly away. Otherwise, she will remain until she has a full abdomen. If you were to cut the sensory nerve to her abdomen that tells when she is full, she would keep sucking until she burst. By trapping her proboscis, the same thing happens.

After she has bitten you, some saliva remains in the wound. The proteins from the saliva evoke an immune response from your body. The area swells (the bump around the bite area is called a wheal), and you itch, a response provoked by the saliva. Eventually, the swelling goes away, but the itch remains until your immune system breaks down the saliva proteins.

To treat mosquito bites, you should wash them with mild soap and water. Try to avoid scratching the bite area, even though it itches. Some anti-itch medicines such as over-the-counter cortisone creams may relieve the itching. Typically, you do not need to seek medical attention (unless you feel dizzy or nauseated, which may indicate a severe allergic reaction to the bite).

An interesting fact about biting mozzies is that their actions cannot pass on HIV because:
1) the mozzie actually digests the virus!
2) they do not ingest enough HIV particles to transmit HIV
3) their feeding and numbing actions take place through different "tubes" and therefore they cannot disgorge infected blood.

_________________
664 Latest lifer: Ovambo sparrowhawk


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Rhombic Egg-eater Help
Unread postPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 8:24 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 26, 2005 1:16 pm
Posts: 52
Location: UCT Zoology Dept. SA Hunters & Game Conservation Association
Hi all

A new year of research is upon us. I am going to research the interaction between rhombic egg-eaters and various birds in one of our lovely parks here in the Western Cape. The problem is, I am with the PercyFitz institute at UCT. We're more on the feathery side of the project, which doesn't really help when doing research such as this.

My question is who is best to talk to about the location, capture and care of these snakes. Have any of you had experience with these snakes and have any tips?

I have e-mailed Martin Whiting in this regard but other contacts wouldn't hurt.

Any info would be appreciated, or info on how to get more info.

Regards

SAHGCA-UCT


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Elephant hair
Unread postPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 9:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:21 pm
Posts: 3
Hi
Does anybody know where I can purchase elephant hair. I stay in Cape Town South Africa


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 12:02 am 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2005 3:40 pm
Posts: 272
Bennie - welcome to the forum.

But I have to ask - what are you going to do with elephant hair?

_________________
We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 7:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:21 pm
Posts: 3
Hi Acekam
Thank you for your reply. I want to use the elephant hair to make an arrm bangle.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 1:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2005 1:28 pm
Posts: 15
Location: GAUTENG
Hi Bennie,
Why re-invent the wheel?.There is a shop at the V&A waterfront that sells these bangles.
If this fails your best bet is to find an Elephant barber and see if he will sell you some :lol:
I will however see what I can find out for you and let you know.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 1:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:21 pm
Posts: 3
Hi Cutman
Thanks for your reply. I actually want to make these bangles myself. Thanks for your willingness to assist me in this regard


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 5:28 pm 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 8:11 pm
Posts: 447
Location: Somewhere in the Bush
Extremely diffucult to keep them. Especially small ones. I'll Pm you with contact details later..


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2007 6:05 pm 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 8:11 pm
Posts: 447
Location: Somewhere in the Bush
Now I am wondering where would they get elephant hair.... :roll:
It will eventually end up like the porcupine quil trade.... it all started by a few who picked quils up until somebody saw the demand and the market...... but I'm sure that poachers are making a few extra buck from the hair already... :?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2007 12:30 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Video of the Year (2013)
Joined: Tue May 31, 2005 11:48 pm
Posts: 849
Location: between a lot of green in Holland
Bennie wrote:
Hi Acekam
Thank you for your reply. I want to use the elephant hair to make an arrm bangle.
Why walking with an arm bangle of elephant hair Bennie? Is that making a person more interesting? I saw these Elephant hair arm bangles in the shops in KNP and I didn't believed my eye,s because it is not allowed to take these arm bangles back to my country. The customs will take it away from you and you get a fine.Poachers will kill an Elephant only for his hair as Pilane already said so how can a person feel proud when he/she is walking with such an unrespecteble piece of animal cruelty. :evil:

_________________
Lets change the world of mankind into the world of kind man.[White Bull]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:44 pm 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 4:10 pm
Posts: 2414
Location: SA
That is so true Nico, I never thought of it that way... :evil:

_________________
Next SANPark: Mapungubwe 2014

Birding Weekend 2014 - Satara 3

Exploring Letaba - '13-'14


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Do lions prefer buffalo for dinner?
Unread postPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 1:15 pm 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Funniest/Best Forumite Name (2013)
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2005 12:38 pm
Posts: 9389
Location: In the shadow of Table Mountain
FAC Member (2012)
This is an article on the home page.

There are a few possibilities here.

NO! They like them just as much for breakfast. :whistle:

Seriously though, is a study warranted for such an obvious fact. They feed more mouths, are plentiful and provide a bit of a challenge to the hunters.

But hey, I am not going to spoil some oke's fun in proving it :wink:

_________________
Whatever (according to BB): "You are correct but I don't want to admit it".


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 3:58 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 1:43 pm
Posts: 749
Location: Jo'burg
I don't think lions prefer Buffalo for dinner (or breakfast for that matter). I suppose it depends on how you want to define what lions prefer. I suppose you could argue that deep down a lion really prefers to eat buffalo because it tastes better and kees him satisfied longer and gives him better tasting burps but that's hardly something that can ever be proved.

A more reasonable approach I would think is to have a look at a lion's typical diet. What do they catch in the wild? I don't have the statistics anymore but I do remember that lions biggest prey items are impala, followed by wildebeest, then giraffe, then zebra and then buffalo. However, the list is topped by scavenged items of food.

This would suggest that lions prefer junk food :wink: but if it comes down to hunting, they prefer impala.

The thing with buffalo is that they are pretty strong and hard to bring down. It usually takes more lions to bring down a buffalo and at greater risk to themselves. As a result, lions don't really hunt buffalo unless they have no other option.

But whether lions actually prefer the aftertaste of buffalo on the palette, I honestly don't know.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Do Giraffes Make A Vocal Noise ?
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2007 9:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:42 pm
Posts: 72
Location: Unknown
Hi everyone ,

Was just wondering if Giraffe make any vocal noise ? I certainly have never heard one call. If they do, what does it sound like ?

Many thanks


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 513 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ... 35  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by Jurie van Vuuren at 12:26:03 Submitted by grannyb at 13:36:11 Submitted by Anonymous at 12:10:12 Submitted by bushwackedblonde at 17:27:19