Skip to Content

The Little 5

Find, identify & discuss the insects of SANParks
User avatar
mfb
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 10:16 pm
Location: JHB

Little 5

Unread postby mfb » Wed Apr 13, 2005 9:35 pm

Anyone seen all the little 5?

buffalo weaver
leopard tortoise
ant lion
elepahant shrew
rhino beetle

I have only one more to go the elephant shrew.

cheers
mike

User avatar
Freda
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 2005
Joined: Sun Dec 05, 2004 7:01 am
Location: Marloth Park, South Africa
Contact:

Unread postby Freda » Wed Apr 13, 2005 9:37 pm

Same here, mfb, where can we find one?

User avatar
DinkyBird
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 46121
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:54 pm
Location: Across the Equator, otherside the Atlantic

Unread postby DinkyBird » Wed Apr 13, 2005 9:39 pm

Just seen buffalo weaver and leopard tortoise. Will set out to see the other three next visit to Kruger.
Sawubona
Dalene

User avatar
Krokodile
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 265
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2004 12:13 am
Location: Wondering if I'll ever get back to SA!
Contact:

Unread postby Krokodile » Wed Apr 13, 2005 10:17 pm

DB - just look outside your accommodation for the ant-lion; theres loads of them in the camps. If you see any conical depressions in the ground (look for sandy ground) with a tiny little hole at the bottom, pluck a blade of grass and very gently stroke it around the hole and see what happens....

The more barbaric way of doing it is to coax a normal ant into one of the holes and watch - fascinating!

User avatar
DinkyBird
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 46121
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:54 pm
Location: Across the Equator, otherside the Atlantic

Unread postby DinkyBird » Wed Apr 13, 2005 10:27 pm

Krokodile wrote:DB - just look outside your accommodation for the ant-lion; theres loads of them in the camps. If you see any conical depressions in the ground (look for sandy ground) with a tiny little hole at the bottom, pluck a blade of grass and very gently stroke it around the hole and see what happens....

The more barbaric way of doing it is to coax a normal ant into one of the holes and watch - fascinating!

Thanks - I am going to do that. I have seen their 'holes' in Kruger but never tried to get the critters out to look at them. We don't get them here at the coast, well if we do, not in any great numbers as it is damp down here.
I have also seen a shrew in my garden, but again don't know enough to say exactly which one. I doubt whether it was an elephant shrew again being on the coast.
Sawubona
Dalene

User avatar
bwana
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 403
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2005 12:55 pm
Location: Neither here nor there.

Unread postby bwana » Wed Apr 13, 2005 10:59 pm

Krokodile wrote:The more barbaric way of doing it is to coax a normal ant into one of the holes and watch - fascinating!


:lol:

bwana
All your snakes are belong to us.

User avatar
Wild@Heart
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 2130
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 6:51 am
Location: In a very busy place

Unread postby Wild@Heart » Thu Apr 14, 2005 6:53 am

I've only seen an 'Ant Lion'
NO TO HOTEL DEVELOPMENT IN KRUGER

User avatar
Jock
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
Posts: 674
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:26 am
Location: Hunter Valley, Australia
Contact:

Unread postby Jock » Thu Apr 14, 2005 8:10 am

Run ants Run, DB coming :shock:
Cheers
Her Highness Jockelina


Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but by the moments that take your breath away

User avatar
Guinea Pig
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 1765
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 12:52 pm
Location: My business...

Unread postby Guinea Pig » Thu Apr 14, 2005 8:20 am

I agree with Krok - try it sometime.

Now I wonder why I hate watching a predator catching a meal but I feed ants to ant lions? :?
On a quest to visit 9 new National Parks in October. :dance:

User avatar
DinkyBird
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 46121
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2004 5:54 pm
Location: Across the Equator, otherside the Atlantic

Unread postby DinkyBird » Thu Apr 14, 2005 8:47 am

Jock wrote:Run ants Run, DB coming :shock:

No I could never do that to them, the ants that is (I vacuum around the ants here at home). I will sit and wait and maybe one will walk over the antlions front door.....let nature take its course!!
Sawubona
Dalene

User avatar
Meg
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
Posts: 749
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2004 12:12 pm
Location: Lowvelder in Brisbane

Re: Little 5

Unread postby Meg » Thu Apr 14, 2005 9:09 am

mfb wrote:Anyone seen all the little 5?

buffalo weaver
leopard tortoise
ant lion
elepahant shrew
rhino beetle

I have only one more to go the elephant shrew.

cheers
mike


I have seen all 5, often (they're not really rare, just in the little 5 because of their names). A good place to look for elephant shrews might be water tanks - we had more than one end up in ours on the farm :D
Mothers hold their children's hands for a while and their hearts forever

User avatar
Wild@Heart
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 2130
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 6:51 am
Location: In a very busy place

The Little 5

Unread postby Wild@Heart » Fri Nov 04, 2005 2:07 pm

Ant lion

The ant lion (Myrmeleontidae) is an odd yet familiar feature of the bushveld, digging conical
depressions in dry, soft sand with which to trap its prey - ants. In advanced stages this
larvae-like creature has wings and sometimes resembles a dragonfly, although it's not well-
adapted for flight.

Buffalo weaver

Red-billed buffalo weavers (Bubarlornis niger) are social birds that build their nests in the
forked branches of tall trees. They nest in open colonies and are a rather noisy and busy
lot. The weavers' nests can be recognised by their rather bedraggled state, made from
coarse grasses and with untidy twig structures.

Rhinoceros beetle

The rhinoceros beetle (Scarabaeinae dynastinae) is one of the largest beetles to in
Southern Africa, with horns on its head much like those of its larger namesake. Both males
and females are horned, but only the males are known for aggressive behaviour, using the
horns to fight rivals. The horns are also used to dig, climb and mate.

Leopard tortoise

The leopard tortoise (Geochelone pardalis) is a striking feature of the bushveld landscape,
getting its name from its black and yellow spotted shell. The animal is one of the largest
breeds of tortoise in this part of the world; a mature leopard tortoise can weigh over 23kg,
with a shell circumference of up to one metre. The males are larger than the females.

Younger tortoises have dark brown patterns while adult shells take on shades of yellow
with somewhat smaller spots. Leopard tortoises live in savannah and grassland areas, close
to water.

Elephant shrew

This tiny insectivore lives in arid lowlands, rocky outcrops and savannah grasslands,
getting its name from its elongated snout. Elephant shrews (Elephantulus myurus) are
found all over South Africa, and only grow to a length of 250mm, with an average weight
of 60g. They feed on insects, fruit, seeds and nuts.

They in turn are food for snakes and raptors, making them extremely shy and wary. The
chances of spotting them are slim indeed, so if you manage to see an elephant shrew
before an actual elephant you can count your safari a real success.
NO TO HOTEL DEVELOPMENT IN KRUGER

User avatar
bert
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Posts: 17192
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2005 9:02 pm
Location: mind in SA, body in The Netherlands

Unread postby bert » Fri Nov 04, 2005 2:16 pm

Nice one W@H

Saw the antlion on the morning walk
(guides have a trick for this)

The leopard tortoise near Dukes WH during a morningdrive

User avatar
Jen
Posts: 199
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:37 am
Location: Gauteng

Unread postby Jen » Sat Nov 05, 2005 6:59 pm

Good place to look for elephant shrew is on rocky outcrops. Have seen many round Punda Maria area. If you do the Nyalaland trail will definately find them on and around the ancient ruins. Just sit quietly and they appear!

User avatar
Meandering Mouse
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
FAC Member (2013)
Posts: 15849
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Location: meandering between senility and menopause

Unread postby Meandering Mouse » Mon Nov 07, 2005 9:49 pm

Seen them all except the elephant shrew.
The buffalo weaver lives in my son's room.
He builds untidy things and pretends that a human lives there. :roll:
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


Return to “Insects and other invertebrates”