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Unread postPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:02 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Sorry, missed this one.......was very busy with the trees in Cape Town! :lol:

I'm not an expert on snakes and this is interesting to find that Green Mambas are not found in KNP! Never new this. This snake was in a tree and I had a good look at it through the binocs as SO was at the camp.

Went back to the camp shop and paged through a snake book. :redface: It was def not a Boomslang. I remember something about the Boomslang's scales being keeled & not smooth. This one's scles looked smooth to me?

Could it be something else? apart from a BS or Mamba? Or could this be a mamba that emigrated??? I know they are found in Zim.

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Unread postPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2006 10:47 pm 
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luislang wrote:
Could it be something else? apart from a BS or Mamba?

Maybe a Green Water Snake (Philothamnus hoplogaster)?
It is often mistaken for the green mamba.

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Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 8:08 am 
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luislang wrote:
It was def not a Boomslang. I remember something about the Boomslang's scales being keeled & not smooth. This one's scles looked smooth to me?

Could it be something else? apart from a BS or Mamba? Or could this be a mamba that emigrated??? I know they are found in Zim.


The big difference for me between boomslang and green mamba is that the BS has got far bigger eyes.

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Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:27 am 
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Yes , I cant see a huge difference in the scales .
And some boomslangs looked dam smooth to me :lol:


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Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2006 1:06 pm 
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Hi Luislang

Perhaps the mistaken green mamba was a Natal Green Snake (Dendrophis natalensis). Quite similar in appearance to a Green Mamba - between 75 and 100 cm in length - bright green. Usually seen between Olifants and Pafuri.


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Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2006 9:28 pm 
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Thanks Nunu

Quite possible as it was ± 1m long.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2006 9:27 pm 
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In 30 years of regular visits to Kruger I have only seen a snake in the camp once and that was in April in Biyamiti. It was a male Puff Adder and I posted a pic of it on the Biyamiti sightings page (2) for April.

Berg en Dal and Biyamiti in September


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 Post subject: snakes in camps
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2006 9:25 pm 
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Hi there

I visited the park for many years and never once saw a snake in a rest camp - or anywhere else for that matter.

The only place we saw a snake was Etosha and it was a python - pretty harmless to humans if you are careful.

We did see a couple of scorpions on the floor in the huts though - so be careful when you put your shoes on. As a rule the bigger the tail the more poisonous the scorpion. The pincers are no indication of danger.

Also we had a fruit bat in our hut one night - we closed all the curtains and opened the door - and it flew out. It was not dangerous - just a little unnerving.

Another time a baboon hopped over the fence and stole some bread of the table. That was pretty scary.

I don't think you see many snakes in camps because there is too much human activity - so the snakes are scared off. I would still be careful around trees and rockeries though - you never know.

The camps are mostly good for bird watching - and you might see an impala or a bush buck or two.

Enjoy your trip
T
PS don't forget the insect repellant


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Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 6:59 pm 
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Hi folks
These stories are fascinating, esp. since i have a phobia (or is that healthy respect) for snakes, & more so since we'll be in the Park from Thursday thru to Monday. I will certainly be a lot more cautious than usual, not that i have been careless in the past. I will probably also find myself scanning the bush for snakes as well as all our other animal friends.

Once we did get a fantastic sighting of a boomslang in a dead bush....SO saw it as we drove past, & when we reversed to identify it, we could easily pick out the identifying features. It was a good opportunity to have a discussion with the kids about snakes & other reptiles. They did the research & relayed the info to the adults. Much discussion ensued.

We found out just how effective the "Nature Studies" in junior schools were in educating the kids about our natural & animal environments. :D

This brings me to a very important educational thrust that relatively few people are aware of :-
Elsewhere on this website (under Honorary Rangers) i have noticed a number of articles about a small group of dedicated HR's who give up their valuable time to go to schools and other young people's groups to do displays & give talks about our National Parks to junior schools children. To my mind, this is where awareness of our natural heritage should start, and i therefore cannot commend these people highly enough for their commitment and initiative.

Regrettably, my kids didn't have the opportunity to benefit from such a wonderful programme, but then again, they did have Mom & Dad to impart their newly researched knowledge onto. I am proud to say that these young adults of mine have a very healthy respect for and knowledge of our world of nature.

This HR team fill the gap where kids do not have the opportunity to learn about & see what many of us fortunates take for granted. My parting shot is this...keep it up HR team, you are doing a wonderful job out there!!!!!

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Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:24 am 
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Hi
In july i had a Black mamba in my tent at Lower sabie tent at the river
i have pic if you would like it?


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Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2006 8:31 am 
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ShOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO WhEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!
How exiting! Yes please we would luv a pic :pray: And also some info on the snake, how big was it, how did you get rid of it and anything else you can share with us :clap: :dance: :D

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2006 8:36 am 
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Hi GJ, and welcome.

A black Mamba in your tent is definitely worth posting a pic,
I am pretty sure it is going to cause many a camper to inspect their tents and sleeping bags more carefully in future tho. :shock: :wink:

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Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2006 9:36 am 
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Has anybody seen / or have pictures of rinkhals in the Kruger, Would luv to hear about it or see the pics.
:D

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Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2006 9:51 am 
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Blackmamba wrote:
Has anybody seen / or have pictures of rinkhals in the Kruger, Would luv to hear about it or see the pics.
:D


Hi Blackmamba,

I tried various sites but non of them specify Kruger as a habitat for rinkhals, thus they should not occur there and could be confused with the moz. spitting cobra.

Quote:
Distribution: From the south-western and southern Cape, northwards over the eastern half of the country, through Orange Free State, Lesotho, Swaziland and Kwazulu-Natal to the Transvaal (south of latitude 25° south); also recorded from the extreme north-eastern part of Zimbabwe (i.e. Inyanga district).


Interesting distrubution on the border of zim and moz though.

Quote:
Hemachatus is restricted to the eastern regions of South Africa.

From the Southern Cape province , N.E through the Orange Free State, Lesotho, Transkei, Natal, Western Swaziland and parts of Transvaal. An isolated population is centered around Inyanga on the Zimbabwe / Mozambique border.

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Unread postPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2006 1:02 pm 
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I BM

I have never seen a rinkhals in the Kruger. They Moz SC seems to be the most common of the cobras throughout the park.


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