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Snakes

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TXDrifter
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Unread postby TXDrifter » Mon Jul 10, 2006 1:23 pm

wildtuinman wrote:
luislang wrote:We always go to the park during winter and never have we seen so many snakes as this time!...June. 3 Puffies , a green and a black mamba.


You get green mambas in Kruger?


Not according to this: :hmz:

"The Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) is perhaps the most feared and most notorious snake in southern Africa. Unlike its counterpart, the green mamba, which has never been found in the Park, it is widespread and common throughout the area. Despite the common name this mamba is never black, but generally grayish-brown above with a grayish-white belly. Adults more than four meters long have been recorded, but these were exceptional and a three-meter length is more common."
http://www.krugerpark.com/resources/reptiles/snakes.htm

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wildtuinman
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Unread postby wildtuinman » Tue Jul 11, 2006 7:21 am

I once saw a heck of a long green snake crossing the tar road @ a rate of knots just north of Satara. I assumed it to be a boomslang.
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luislang
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Unread postby luislang » Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:02 pm

Sorry, missed this one.......was very busy with the trees in Cape Town! :lol:

I'm not an expert on snakes and this is interesting to find that Green Mambas are not found in KNP! Never new this. This snake was in a tree and I had a good look at it through the binocs as SO was at the camp.

Went back to the camp shop and paged through a snake book. :redface: It was def not a Boomslang. I remember something about the Boomslang's scales being keeled & not smooth. This one's scles looked smooth to me?

Could it be something else? apart from a BS or Mamba? Or could this be a mamba that emigrated??? I know they are found in Zim.
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Katja
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Unread postby Katja » Wed Jul 12, 2006 10:47 pm

luislang wrote:Could it be something else? apart from a BS or Mamba?

Maybe a Green Water Snake (Philothamnus hoplogaster)?
It is often mistaken for the green mamba.
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wildtuinman
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Unread postby wildtuinman » Thu Jul 13, 2006 8:08 am

luislang wrote: It was def not a Boomslang. I remember something about the Boomslang's scales being keeled & not smooth. This one's scles looked smooth to me?

Could it be something else? apart from a BS or Mamba? Or could this be a mamba that emigrated??? I know they are found in Zim.


The big difference for me between boomslang and green mamba is that the BS has got far bigger eyes.
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bucky
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Unread postby bucky » Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:27 am

Yes , I cant see a huge difference in the scales .
And some boomslangs looked dam smooth to me :lol:

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nunu
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Unread postby nunu » Mon Jul 17, 2006 1:06 pm

Hi Luislang

Perhaps the mistaken green mamba was a Natal Green Snake (Dendrophis natalensis). Quite similar in appearance to a Green Mamba - between 75 and 100 cm in length - bright green. Usually seen between Olifants and Pafuri.

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snakes in camps

Unread postby tanjan » Sun Oct 22, 2006 9:25 pm

Hi there

I visited the park for many years and never once saw a snake in a rest camp - or anywhere else for that matter.

The only place we saw a snake was Etosha and it was a python - pretty harmless to humans if you are careful.

We did see a couple of scorpions on the floor in the huts though - so be careful when you put your shoes on. As a rule the bigger the tail the more poisonous the scorpion. The pincers are no indication of danger.

Also we had a fruit bat in our hut one night - we closed all the curtains and opened the door - and it flew out. It was not dangerous - just a little unnerving.

Another time a baboon hopped over the fence and stole some bread of the table. That was pretty scary.

I don't think you see many snakes in camps because there is too much human activity - so the snakes are scared off. I would still be careful around trees and rockeries though - you never know.

The camps are mostly good for bird watching - and you might see an impala or a bush buck or two.

Enjoy your trip
T
PS don't forget the insect repellant

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GJ
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Unread postby GJ » Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:24 am

Hi
In july i had a Black mamba in my tent at Lower sabie tent at the river
i have pic if you would like it?

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Unread postby Elsa » Mon Oct 30, 2006 8:36 am

Hi GJ, and welcome.

A black Mamba in your tent is definitely worth posting a pic,
I am pretty sure it is going to cause many a camper to inspect their tents and sleeping bags more carefully in future tho. :shock: :wink:
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wildtuinman
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Unread postby wildtuinman » Wed Nov 01, 2006 9:51 am

Blackmamba wrote:Has anybody seen / or have pictures of rinkhals in the Kruger, Would luv to hear about it or see the pics.
:D


Hi Blackmamba,

I tried various sites but non of them specify Kruger as a habitat for rinkhals, thus they should not occur there and could be confused with the moz. spitting cobra.

Distribution: From the south-western and southern Cape, northwards over the eastern half of the country, through Orange Free State, Lesotho, Swaziland and Kwazulu-Natal to the Transvaal (south of latitude 25° south); also recorded from the extreme north-eastern part of Zimbabwe (i.e. Inyanga district).


Interesting distrubution on the border of zim and moz though.

Hemachatus is restricted to the eastern regions of South Africa.

From the Southern Cape province , N.E through the Orange Free State, Lesotho, Transkei, Natal, Western Swaziland and parts of Transvaal. An isolated population is centered around Inyanga on the Zimbabwe / Mozambique border.
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nunu
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Unread postby nunu » Wed Nov 01, 2006 1:02 pm

I BM

I have never seen a rinkhals in the Kruger. They Moz SC seems to be the most common of the cobras throughout the park.

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nunu
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Unread postby nunu » Thu Nov 02, 2006 9:38 am

Sorry its not Pilane BUT

According to U. De V. Pienaar in "The reptile fauna of the KNP", there are only two cobras found in the Park:

The Moz Spitting Cobra and the Egyptian Cobra, (nowadays this species in sub-saharan Africa is recognised as as a separate genus and is called a Snouted Cobra).

Ciao

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Unread postby Pilane » Thu Nov 02, 2006 9:04 pm

Sorry, sleeping a bit.... :redface:

No the Rhinkhals is not found in KNP. Why not? That is a good question... The Rhinkhals does not occur in a lot of areas where it "should":roll: There was some research done on this at one stage, but I did not keep track thereof. Must see if I can get an update on it... Personally I feel that this could be due to limiting factors... but which- diffucult one..? :roll:

Remember the Rhinkhals is not a cobra.

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Unread postby freespirit » Sat Nov 04, 2006 8:36 pm

Hi all,

I am also a big fan of snakes...such amazing creatures!!

I sure hope GJ comes up with the photo and tells the story.

Since we are all telling our snake stories... he he....
While on a wilderness trail (trying to remember which one) we had a black mamba in one of the tiny little A-frame huts. It was coiled up on one of the beams. The funny thing is that the night before I had been kept awake by bats flying in my hut. The people in this hut said "no we didnt have any bats". Then when we discovered the snake we realised why!!! :D

The sad part of the story is that the ranger didnt have a snake hook or anything and didnt want to take a chance on the snake disappearing into the hut and then the people couldnt stay in the hut. So he ended up shooting it. :cry:
Very sad.

I now have a snake hook that I take with me everywhere in the bush. If I can save a snakes life by having it then I will be happy.

After that incident, and helping the ranger with his solution, I went for a nice cool shower. Off with the clothes, water on, head under the water looking up...hey there's another snake curled up on the beam...in the shower hut!!! I contemplated my choices and running naked or calling for help just didnt seem like my style. so I slowly got dressed with my eye on the snake.

Luckily it was a female boomslang this time and we managed to get her out without too much trouble.

I loved the experience of seeing these snakes. I always hope to see snakes. Although like any sane person, I wouldnt want to be surprised by one!!

I'm off to bushmans trail tomorrow, sabi sands then skukuza.
Hope its not too hot but maybe I'll see some slangetjies!

will check in when I get back.

cheers.
Free Spirit


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