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Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:33 am 
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I have been going to Kruger for many years. Dec 2003 we stayed at a lodge just outside Kruger there were so many snakes, ever night when we came walking back from having dinner we would get right up close to them and they would then slither off the warm path way. Dec 2005 we stay at the same place and nothing not one snake can anyone tell me why?

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Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:44 pm 
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Blackmamba wrote:
I have been going to Kruger for many years. Dec 2003 we stayed at a lodge just outside Kruger there were so many snakes, ever night when we came walking back from having dinner we would get right up close to them and they would then slither off the warm path way. Dec 2005 we stay at the same place and nothing not one snake can anyone tell me why?


You just had bad luck or good luck whichever way you want to look at it

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Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:07 pm 
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Blackmamba wrote:
I have been going to Kruger for many years. Dec 2003 we stayed at a lodge just outside Kruger there were so many snakes, ever night when we came walking back from having dinner we would get right up close to them and they would then slither off the warm path way. Dec 2005 we stay at the same place and nothing not one snake can anyone tell me why?


Blackmamba, very clever question......
It has all to do with environmental factors as rainfall, temperature, availability of food which in turn is also dependant on its own environmental factors. (sometimes also influenced by external human factors :( )

I do not know the spesific rainfall figures (2003/5) for the area you talking about :roll: but It basically comes down to less rain -less food - resulting less snakes in their natural habitat but more in and around your home....... :twisted: as they look for food..... who in turn looks for food in your home.....

(Different species will react differently to the same environmental conditions though. i.e. a limiting factor for one species is not always a limmiter for another species.....)


Last edited by Pilane on Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:13 pm 
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Legendary Virtual Ranger
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You have an interesting name Blackmamba.
Do you know what kind of snakes?
Your name suggests that you do have a special interest in snakes.
.. and welcome to the forum :!: :!:

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Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:19 pm 
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2005, until about November, was a very bad year in terms of rain.
It was at the Park in October, and it was the most desolate I had seen.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:11 am 
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Hi there Macho Mouse, and thanks for the welcome. To say I have a special interest in snakes is an understatement to say the least, I am obsessed with them (specifically the Black Mamba). So hopefully I can learn more from these discussions (forums) and I love reading stories about people's encounters with them.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 12:07 pm 
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HI Pilane,

Thanks so much for your very interesting reply I knew I could rely on you for an answer. You're the man.

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 Post subject: Snakes: Interesting Facts About Puff Adders and Other Snakes
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 12:03 am 
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Hi everyone! Although I haven't been posting for a while, I have heard about the recent debate involving the snakes in the Kalagadi and have read an interesting article on puff adders in the Wild Magazine. I have also read books about snakes and since a young age have always taken a keen interest in snakes. Therefore I have decided to post a few interesting facts about the infamous puffies. If any of you know something cool about these reptiles you are welcome to post.

The Puff Adder

Puff adders are found almost everywhere in South Africa (surprise! :twisted: ) They prey on rodents and other small mammals. Puffies' venom is cytotoxic and causes intense and severe pain and massive necrosis (tissue damage) in the area of the bite. Depending on were the bite occurs on your body and how long it is before treatment amputation may be neccesary. Although adult puffies seem more threatening to your health, babies are far more dangerous, I quote "because they haven't learned to control their venom." The puffie is known as South Africa's most dangerous snake and is describes as fat, lazy and bad-tempered. This is not true but puffies are of a stout build and have a different hunting strategy to most snakes. The puffies do not have special heat sensors like rattlers or even good eyesight and so rely on smell and sensing the vibrations created by moving objects. Due to this, they will lie in wait for their prey and many a human will stumble on them because of the snakes' excellent camouflage. Even when you are near, the puff adder will not bite. It will warn you of its presence and will try to get away. If you continue to threaten it, it will coil into the strike position and will inevitably bite. All this can be averted if you just keep a sharp eye and respect the snake. Don't try to get a close-up photo or to touch it. The strike is lightning fast. You can't dodge it. When you find yourself near a puffie don't run either. Back slowly away untill the snake is out of sight. Never turn your back on the snake. Even if you are bitten, do not cry yourself to death in a hospital bed because you just "know" you're going to lose your leg. Many snakes give dry bites as a warning. In these strikes, the snake doesn't inject any venom. Even if venom is injected, the snakes treat it like gold as it takes a lot of time to make. The snake will inject the least amount of venom possible. The only exception is when the snake has already been teased to breaking point or has already bitten you. To sum this all up: if you treat snakes with respect you will not be bitten. Leave them alone because this is their planet too.


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 Post subject: Re: Interesting and NB Facts About Puff Adders and Other Snakes
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 7:19 pm 
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Thank you Eagle Eyes, :thumbs_up: that is most informative.

I hope that I never have to back off from a puffie.

Does anyone have a good photo for this excellent post?

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting and NB Facts About Puff Adders and Other Snakes
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 8:02 pm 
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Hi

Excellent subject, Eagle Eyes :clap: .

I would like to mention that the Stiletto snake (Atractaspis bibronii, cannot be safely held behind the head like any other venomous snake. It turns its head to the side and stab you with a fang. Hence the name: Side stabbing snake. Other / older names include: Bibron's burrowing asp and Mole viper. It has a STRONG cytotoxic(tissue destroying) venom and no antivenom is available.

Be careful


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 Post subject: Re: Interesting and NB Facts About Puff Adders and Other Snakes
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 8:37 pm 
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MM We're happy to share these photos which have recently used in our TR.

The patterns are so beautiful and perfect!

Image

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting and NB Facts About Puff Adders and Other Snakes
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 9:20 pm 
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@Chappie - Thanx! Great pix :clap: :clap: :clap:

Here is another Puffie - CT style! 8)

Image


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 Post subject: Re: Interesting and NB Facts About Puff Adders and Other Snakes
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 9:23 pm 
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@Mfezi- Thanx for the cool facts about the Stiletto Snake! Awesome! :clap: :clap: :clap:
Do you know where we can see this snake as I wouldn't like to bump into it.


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 Post subject: Re: Interesting and NB Facts About Puff Adders and Other Snakes
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 10:02 pm 
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A few years ago I nearly stood on a puffie while coming down the track from Table mountain . He was sunning himself in the afternoon sun and we were tired after climbing from the top I noticed a brown shadow on the cement road and thpught it was a log. and just as I was about to step over it I realised it was a nice plump puffie I carefully stepped back and the puffy slowly wiggled into fynbos.. All So could worry about that if I was bitten who was going to carry me down ( this was before Cell phones)

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 Post subject: Re: Interesting and NB Facts About Puff Adders and Other Snakes
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 10:44 pm 
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Chappie omitted to say that the pattern of the scales is unique and distinctive to each snake, like a human fingerprint.

Interesting thread, Eagle Eyes :thumbs_up:

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