Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 1 of 1
 [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelope
Unread postPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 8:05 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 11, 2010 8:42 pm
Posts: 112
Location: Body:Pretoria ; Soul:Kruger
In the previous post we discussed the three main guilds used to classify the large grazers of the Kruger National Park. The population sizes of species within these guilds in a savanna ecosystem such as Kruger, are mainly determined by the level of fulfillment of their dietary and habitat requirements as well as the impact of predators on their population. These three key components (diet, habitat and predation) are in turn influenced by the 4 drivers of savannas (geology, climate, herbivory and fire).

In previous posts in the Science and Research Forum (Rockhound-Roan antelope numbers in Kruger National Park), details were given of how artificial water provisioning negatively impacted on the diet, habitat and predation rates of roan antelope. Man-made waterholes erected in naturally dry areas, opened up these landscapes to water-dependent species such as zebra. The increased zebra population competed with the scarcer roan for grazing. Large areas of medium to tall grass preferred by roan were transformed into short grass stands by the constant presence of zebra and also wildebeest near these waterholes, degrading the habitat of the rare antelope. More zebras also resulted in the increase of their main predator, the lion, which then started to predate at a disproportionate rate on the low numbers of roan in the park.

New research findings from Kruger also shows how vital climate is in determining the type of grass and therefore the types of grazers to be found in a specific area. Like all organisms, grasses need to find a balance between growth, maintenance, storage, reproduction and defense in order to thrive. Grasses in savannas use mainly 2 strategies of utilizing metabolic performance. Under the first strategy, grasses are geared towards maximizing growth under favourable or stable conditions such as high rainfall and high temperatures. This is the RMP (Resource Responsive Metabolic Performance) Mode. Under the second strategy, grasses focus on maintaining themselves through harsh times such as cold winters and/or very dry periods. This is called the SMP (Sustained Metabolic Performance) Mode.

Basically this means that in areas with relatively low moisture stress and high temperatures, grasses don’t need to worry about sustaining themselves through harsh periods and can focus primarily on production. In contrast, grasses growing in areas with cold winters or long dry periods need to focus on surviving through the harsh times.

Grasses using the RMP strategy can focus on growth, leading to high nitrogen levels in their leaves. Young leaves of these grasses are the most sought after because of the high nitrogen concentration. These kinds of grasses are therefore preferred by the grazing guild of bulk grazers of short grasses (zebra and wildebeest). The more the plant grows however, the more the nitrogen becomes diluted by structural material and thus becomes less favourable to this guild.

Grasses taking the SMP strategy focus on maintenance and storage and therefore possess high quality carbon favoured by the selective grazer guild of rarer antelope such as sable, roan, tsessebe and eland.

Image
Roan and Sable - rare antelope and selective grazers with a preference for high quality carbon.

From climatic data obtained in Kruger over the past century, it is clear that average temperatures (especially night-time temperatures) are increasing, perhaps linked to global warming. This has had a direct impact on the metabolic strategies employed by grasses in Kruger. In the past, cooler and drier parts of Kruger had a higher percentage of grasses employing the SMP strategy. Due to increasing temperatures, more grasses are starting to convert to the RMP strategy. The reduction in SMP-grasses corresponds with the decrease in grazers who utilize them (all the rare antelope). The link can be seen even more clearly by looking at the current distribution of these rare antelope. Although sable is predominantly found in the western nutrient-poor areas while roan and tsessebe are found in the nutrient-rich eastern parts of Kruger, the distribution of all these species are becoming more concentrated in the higher (cooler) or drier areas of their range. Higher contours and drier areas will of course produce a higher proportion of SMP grasses. Therefore, as the overall area of Kruger is becoming hotter, less and less areas will remain suitable for the rare antelope to utilize.

One would think that the higher temperatures and therefore higher proportion of RMP-grasses would suite high-nitrogen grazers such as zebra and wildebeest. This is true up to a point. However, if the conditions become too favourable for grass production, the profuse growth will have a negative impact on the overall nitrogen quality by way of dilution. This can indeed be seen in the population numbers of these two above mentioned grazers. Historic data shows that their numbers normally increase in drier periods (when grass production is limited and kept at high nitrogen concentrations) and then decrease in wetter periods. Furthermore, their long-term numbers initially increased with the increase in temperatures and later declined (due to continued increase in temperatures and nitrogen quality dilution). The numbers of blue wildebeest specifically, have gone down more due to their critical requirement of short grass with a high nitrogen concentration.

The third grazing guild of bulk grazers tolerant of fibrous material seems to be unaffected by the temperature increase. Buffalo and waterbuck are both water dependent and are therefore more sensitive to rainfall patterns. Historic data indeed shows that their numbers increase during wet periods and decline sharply during droughts.

In nature, there is never a single answer. Even though temperatures are increasing, sable and roan can still have high reproductive rates as can be seen in the Mokala National Park. The key is that there are no predators of these antelope in Mokala. It seems that a combination of climate change, habitat change and predation together resulted in the decrease of rare antelope in Kruger. Sub-optimal nutrition probably resulted in lower vitality and therefore higher vulnerability to predators.

These new findings as set out above make it clear that the management of the impact of climate change on biodiversity will be one of the key areas of focus for conservationists in decades to come.

References:
Seydack, A.H., Grant, C.C., Smit, I.P., Vermeulen, W.J., Baard, J. & Zambatis, N., 2012, ‘Climate and vegetation in a semi-arid savanna: Development of a climate–vegetation response model linking plant metabolic performance to climate and the effects on forage availability for large herbivores’, Koedoe 54(1), Art. #1046, 12 pages. http:// dx.doi.org/10.4102/koedoe. v54i1.1046

Seydack, A.H., Grant, C.C., Smit, I.P., Vermeulen, W.J., Baard, J. & Zambatis, N., 2012, ‘Large herbivore population performance and climate in a South African semi-arid savanna’, Koedoe 54(1), Art. #1047, 20 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/ koedoe.v54i1.1047

_________________
13 Dec 2012 Pretoriuskop
14-15 Dec 2012 Lower Sabie
16 Dec 2012 Tamboti
17-18 Dec 2012 Satara
19-22 Dec 2012 Shingwedzi
23 Dec 2012 Punda Maria


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 3:49 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:45 pm
Posts: 403
Location: London
Wow thanks - just found your amazing post tucked in this not often visited sub-forum. Loads of interesting information here - thanks Ifubesi. I hope to see some Sable and Roan and take good pics in a few days time.

_________________
Berg en Dal: 10/08/2014 - 13/08/2014
Satara: 13/08/2014 - 16/08/2014
Croc Bridge: 16/08/2014 - 17/08/2014


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 6:14 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Posts: 12141
Location: meandering between senility and menopause
FAC Member (2013)
Ifubesi, thank you for that very comprehensive analysis. Quite sobering really. Thank goodness for our smaller parks like Mokala.... just another reason to visit as soon as I can.

_________________
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 6:28 am 
Offline
Forum Assistant
Forum Assistant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 6:39 am
Posts: 8433
Location: Pretoria SA
FAC Member (2012)
Ifubesi wrote:
if the conditions become too favourable for grass production, the profuse growth will have a negative impact on the overall nitrogen quality by way of dilution.


This is very interesting and makes absolute sense! Thanks Ifubesi! :thumbs_up:

_________________
"Happiness, I have discovered, is nearly always a rebound from hard work." - David Grayson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 8:34 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 11, 2010 8:42 pm
Posts: 112
Location: Body:Pretoria ; Soul:Kruger
Hi Graham. I am also going to look for some Roan from tomorrow when I am in the northern parts of Kruger. Perhaps I bump into you along the way!

_________________
13 Dec 2012 Pretoriuskop
14-15 Dec 2012 Lower Sabie
16 Dec 2012 Tamboti
17-18 Dec 2012 Satara
19-22 Dec 2012 Shingwedzi
23 Dec 2012 Punda Maria


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 2:35 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2005 10:24 am
Posts: 209
Location: Kempton Park
Ifubesi - spend some time at Tihongonyeni - saw Roan drinking there recently.

That area fascinates me and I can spend hours there just staring at the vast openness.

I again suggest you consolidate these threads into one - Fascinating reading and I thank you :thumbs_up:

Enjoy the trip !!!

Edit - Added photo's

Image

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 2:36 pm 
Offline
Forum Assistant
Forum Assistant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 6:39 am
Posts: 8433
Location: Pretoria SA
FAC Member (2012)
Avon, we also love to spend hours at Tihongonyeni! It is a fantastic place to sit and watch all the different kinds of animals coming for a drink of water. Unfortunately we didn't see any Roan in February, but the proof is in your picture! Thanks! :dance: :dance:

I agree with you 100% about consolidating these threads into one! Ifubesi, please consider this! :thumbs_up:

_________________
"Happiness, I have discovered, is nearly always a rebound from hard work." - David Grayson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2012 9:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2012 8:20 pm
Posts: 8
Hi Ifubesi,

Wow, this was a really informative post - really shows how many different effects there are when one variable changes. Any idea if different types of grasses react differently to changing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations (perhaps in a similar way to how C4 plants react differently to C3 plants)? Or perhaps this effect is too small to make a difference to the different grasses?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 8:21 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 11, 2010 8:42 pm
Posts: 112
Location: Body:Pretoria ; Soul:Kruger
Hi Rockhound.
I am not sure about carbon dioxide influences on specific grass families. However, the effect of higher average temperatures (correlated to higher carbon dioxide levels) does impact some grass families more than others.

For instance, the Andropogoneae species such as Themeda triandra tend to employ the SMP strategy as it can be found in areas with high seasonal variability (such as cold winters). Due to a warming climate, these grasses are slowly changing their strategies to the RMP type, thereby impacting on the grazing species that depend on them for survival during the dry season.

Families such as Paniceae of which Panicum maximum is a member, normally employs the RMP strategy in any case and therefore the animals that focus on them should not be affected as much through increasing temperatures. This is of course a very over-simplified summary but you get the idea.

Of course, by now it is also clear that higher carbon dioxide levels favour woody plants over grasses in general. This is probably one of the reasons why so many parts of the savanna biome is experiencing a problem with bush encroachment.

_________________
13 Dec 2012 Pretoriuskop
14-15 Dec 2012 Lower Sabie
16 Dec 2012 Tamboti
17-18 Dec 2012 Satara
19-22 Dec 2012 Shingwedzi
23 Dec 2012 Punda Maria


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 8:35 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:26 am
Posts: 671
Location: Hunter Valley, Australia
Very interesting once again. Certainly makes one think about how everything has a direct or indirect impact on everything.

_________________
Cheers
Her Highness Jockelina


Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but by the moments that take your breath away


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 23, 2013 9:09 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2009 6:04 pm
Posts: 49
Location: Johannesburg
Thanks a lot for this info!

_________________
One star fish at a time


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Kruger Ecology 7: Climate change's effect on rare antelo
Unread postPosted: Mon Dec 23, 2013 9:32 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2011 8:58 am
Posts: 3611
Location: Far South in South Africa.
Ifubesi..... :hmz: ..... Image :thumbs_up:

_________________
"Lose yourself in Nature and find Peace!" (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
UNITE AGAINST POACHING...What we protect,
do not let poachers take it away!

Extinction is forever and survival is up to---every last one of us!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by swartj at 19:10:55 Submitted by Anonymous at 06:50:42 Submitted by enrico at 05:56:25 Submitted by tomdchef at 20:04:22