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The Fishes of the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK

Find, identify & discuss the marine species of SANParks
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gmlsmit
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Re: The Fishes of the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK

Unread postby gmlsmit » Thu Mar 18, 2010 11:56 am

Banded Tilapia.
Vleikurper
Tilapia sparmanii
Family : CHICLIDAE


Description

The coloring of this species is variable from silvery grey to dark olive green with vertical bars or stripes, sometimes up to nine, the lower lip is white. The body markings of both sexes change quite dramaically during their breeding season ranging from November to March. The vertical bars become much more apparant, two horizontal bars appera across the snout as well as a circular stripe throughthe eyes and over the forehead. The dorsal and caudal fins of the males are then edged with red irridescent blue-green spots also appear on the dorsal and anal fins.
This little fish is the smallest of the Tilapia species inhabiting the Park, adults seldomnly exceed 150 mm in length.

Biology and Ecology.

This species is quite tolerant of colder conditions and is rarely found below an altitude of 600 metres, and have never been found in the perrenial rivers of the Park, they have only been found in permanent pools in of the seasonal rivers and streams with swampy conditions containing an abundance of floating and submerged vegetation.

The little eggs are laid on a stone, the stem of a reed or a clean spot on a hard bottom, bothe parents gaurd the eggs. One of them lies over the eggs fanning them with its breast fins, while other is on gaurd not far away, they regularly change duties often within a minute. The alevin are kept in small holes in the bottom untill they are able to swim. The newly bred have four mucus glands on the head from where a sticky colourless secretion is released which anchors the little fish to the bottom or sides of the hole, with the little tail constantly vibrating.

The alevin are daily sucked into the mouth of the parent and transferred to a new hole.

The fry later move in compact little shoals gaurded by both parents. Once the brood becomes independant the parents rest for a short while and then repeat the process.

Distribution

These little fish have been recorded only in the Shipandane pools in the tsende River, the Nkutkulatane waterhole in the Nwasintsonto and the permanent waterholes of the Munweni River on the eastern Park boundary.

Threats

Water polution caused by domestic, agricultural, industrial and mining waste deposited into the feeder systems, changing the water to a low pH (acidic)
Last edited by gmlsmit on Thu Mar 18, 2010 12:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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gmlsmit
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Re: The Fishes of the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK

Unread postby gmlsmit » Thu Mar 18, 2010 12:41 pm

Southern Red Breasted Tilapia.
Suidelike Rooiborskurper
Tilapia randalli swierstrae
Family : CHICLIDAE

Description

The outward apperance of the young of this species quite similar to the Banded Tilapia, but displays only 5 to 6 dark vertical bars on the lateral surface. They also have a pink colouring on the throat. The "Tilapia" spot is prominent on the dorsal fin but fades away later in life. The bright red colouring on the throat and breast of the breeding male gives this attractive fish its name.

The caudal fin is also distinctively coloured being dark greyish on the upper half with the lower half a yellowish-pink.

This fish grows to a mass of 1.8kg.

It is primary a vegeterian preferring the leaves and stalks of soft aquatic plants, but also on occasions feed on earthworms, crickets and similar insects. The fry feed mainly on plankton.

Biology and Ecology.

This species is less adaptable to conditions; it is less tolerant to salinity and colder waters than the T. mossambicus and the T. sparmanii. This species is very usefull in controlling excessive aquatic vegetation in ponds and dams.

Sexual maturity is reached at the age of about 4-5 months and breeding occurs at approximately 6 weeks intervals and continues untill the water temperature drops below 21 C.

Both parents take care of the eggs and the young. The eggs about 2.5 mm in diameter are laid in a saucer shaped depression, which the male had excavated in the sandy bottom. Depending on the water temperature the little eggs hatch after three to six days.

The nests are situated in shallow water. Little pits are excavated to which the young are transferred to by the parents, where they are gaurded untill they are old enough to disperse an take care of themselves.

Distribution

This species is well represented in weedy, queit backwashes and gullies and large placid pools of all the perrenial and seasonal rivers of the Park.


Threats

Water polution caused by domestic, agricultural, industrial and mining waste deposited into the feeder systems, changing the water to a low pH (acidic)
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fee
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Re: The Fishes of the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK

Unread postby fee » Sat Feb 25, 2012 8:30 am

gmlsmit - Can you tell me what type of fish are found in Lake Panic.

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Re: The Fishes of the KRUGER NATIONAL PARK

Unread postby gmlsmit » Sat Feb 25, 2012 12:11 pm

Dear friends.

Anyone who has photographs of fish should please feel free to post them on this thread. Your photographic skills will not be criticized, instead the photos will be enjoyed and appreciated.

Fish in Lake Panic will include most of the species common to the Sabi River and its tributaries.

It will include many of the Tilapia family e.g. Dwarf Tilapia, Lowveld Large-mouth, Southern Red-breasted Tilapia, Red-fin Tilapia also commonly known as the Mozambique Tilapia. Tiger-fish are unlikely but fry may be present. Madagascar Mottled Eel may be found as well Long finned Eel. Bull-dogs as well as Churchills may be present.

Red-tailed and Silver Robbers should be present as well as Large Scaled Yellow-fish together with most of the Barb family.

The Labeo (Mudfish) species will be represented by the Red-spotted and Red-eye, Red-nosed, Silver and Plumbous Labeo.

Minnows will be represented by the Barred Minnow and the River Sardine.

Catfish will be well represented by Butter and Common or Sharp-tooth Catfish. Squeakers may be present as well as Saw-fin and Bearded or Lowveld Catlets.

And lastly who knows maybe a few Large Scaled Yellow-fish representing the Barbus species.

Please share your fish sightings at Lake Panic and elsewhere in the Park with those of us Piscatorians..

Park on a bridge and watch you will soon see a swirl or a shadow or maybe a flash of colour or maybe a shoal of these wonderful animals.

We once spent some wonderful time on the Lower Sabi Bridge, watching some Mozambican Tilapia taking their chances around a basking Crocodile in the clear water, and also some Labeo ridding Hippos of their external parasites.

The ponds in the Rest camps usually have a few Dwarf and Mozambican Tilapia, spend some time here and you may see the male displaying his breading colours and if you are really lucky a pair taking care of their spawn - sucking them into their mouths away from any possible lurking danger.

Wearing Polaroid type glasses improve your chances of a good fish sighting exponentially.
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Fish in Pioneer dam?

Unread postby Rooies » Thu Apr 11, 2013 2:25 pm

Any idea what species of fish can be found in this dam at Mopani? I have been working for years on plans on how to get out of camp undetected and try my luck at little bit of fishing. With all the effort that I will put in to get there, I must make sure I have the right gear for the expedition.
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Re: Fish in Pioneer dam?

Unread postby Rooies » Thu Apr 11, 2013 4:29 pm

OK, I am not serious about the planned fishing but what I want to know is whether there are only local species or have aliens, like the bass family, managed to get in. I assume that the water quality is very good due to the fact that the waters that feed the dam is not polluted.
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Re: Fish in Pioneer dam?

Unread postby Rooies » Wed Apr 17, 2013 3:57 pm

gmlsmit wrote:The Pioneer Dam is in the Tsendze River.

The tsendze River is made up of many creeks and spruits and small rivers all staring in the KNP, the water of the Tsendze should therefore be reasonably unpolluted as it is a seasonal river with very little if any feed from outside the KNP.

Species that should be found in te Pioneer Dam will include Catfish (Barbel and catlets), Barbs ( Silverfish, Large Scale Yellow Fish, Ghieliemientjies), Tilapia ( various Kurpers some call them Bream), maybe some members of the Eel species as the Tsendze flows into the Letaba River which joins up with the Olifants River where eels are known to exist, for the same reason one could also expect the odd Tigerfish to be pre Gobies should be sent (Hydrocynus vittatus). Gobies should be well represented as well as members of the Labeo family (Mudfish) and also River sardines. (Engraulicyprus brevianalis).


Thanks Gerhard, I forgot about this one. :thumbs_up:
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Re: Fish in Pioneer dam?

Unread postby gmlsmit » Wed Apr 17, 2013 7:08 pm

My pleasure, fishing used to be one of my big interest, now just the fish. :D
I participate because I care - CUSTOS NATURAE
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