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Wildlife photography - Composition guidelines

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bert
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Unread postby bert » Thu Mar 16, 2006 3:41 pm

francoisd wrote:I

Let see if I can spot what’s wrong with the composition of the picture?


Not much really :?
Actually it is a very good one :D
Foreground is blurred so that doesnt distract from the main subject. Placed well, and as DQ said, getting the long thin things sharp is very hard . A little movement and these things start swaying like a rod with a great white on it.
Indeed F8 o F11 would be nicer.

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bert
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Unread postby bert » Sat Mar 18, 2006 9:35 pm

Image
Horizontal

Image
Vertical

Same situation but very different composition.

Suppose it is also a matter of taste.
Didnt move a inch. Just tried to create a new image with the aid of the camera

Taken two weeks ago in Holland
70-200 4.0L
Last Velvia 50 slide film

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Yvonne B.
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Unread postby Yvonne B. » Mon Mar 20, 2006 10:49 pm

I can imagine that quite some people, who are not much trained to make technical good pics, get tired by thinking all you have to think of before you press the shutter, I know I did when I started.

What helped me a lot, is training on different items, with an object that don't move, and which you can approach from various sides.
In the "old" days, when you had films, it was pretty expensive to do it, but nevertheless very usefull. But a problem was as well, that there was always several days between your practising and seeing the results.
With digital this problem is gone.
You can place an object of different hights, and make shots, try to keep the rules of composition in mind. Make different shots, with you subject in different positions, and train yourself not just to look at the subject, but also to its enviroment. Could be useful having a pen and notebook at hand and just write down what you did, and compare the shots, and decide what YOU like best. Try to speed up more, so you can also handle situations with moving object.
If you take shots from various points, you will experience what the sunlight does to you object, and what different backgrounds do to your pics.
Sounds maybe very simplistic, and it probably is, but I know it helped me a lot.
It will take time, but that time will pay itself back double.
Walk like you talk

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DuQues
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Unread postby DuQues » Tue Mar 21, 2006 11:15 am

I often walk around looking for photo's with nothing but my eyes as equipment. Just look at a building, tree, group of people, and see how I would set up the shot if I had had my camera with me. Trying to pick out a certain thing, like ornaments or such. Thinking of backlight, looking what would possibly disturb in the shot, how to remove it, etc.
What lensopening I would use (how much background), what shutterspeed (movement) and actually, which lens to use.

It's a bit like the movie producer running around with a lens in his hand, checking shots.
You can do it anywhere, and no one will even notice.
And it's free!
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Re: Wildlife photography - Composition guidelines

Unread postby Bigmouth » Thu Mar 30, 2006 8:33 am

madach wrote:One of the most important things in photography is composition.


Is the composition of a particular photo not a personal 'feeling'?

Per example; I have a photo of a very green bush in the Lower Sabie area with only the head of an elephant sticking out amongst the trees. The ellie is very much central in the photo. If you would personally like to see the skyline for instance. Would you not judge this photo as having a bad composition?

Or if you would enter your photo of the leopard in some competition and the particular judge would like to see more of the leopard, would that photo not be judged as bad composition?
Kruger National Park is OPEN !!!

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DuQues
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Re: Wildlife photography - Composition guidelines

Unread postby DuQues » Thu Mar 30, 2006 9:49 am

Bigmouth wrote:Is the composition of a particular photo not a personal 'feeling'?

Yes, you use the composition of that photo to impart that particular feeling to the viewer. The feeling of the incredable sight of, in your case, the glimpsed ellie. Or the height of the skyscrapers, the emptyness in a desert, the cold in the arctic, the bubbly taste of a good glass of champagne, etc.
If your composition is good the viewer will "experience" that feeling.

But if there is something distracting the viewer, like in your lions case an empty champagne bottle from the other shot lying in front, you will fail to impart that feeling. You then have composed your photo wrongly.
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madach
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Re: Wildlife photography - Composition guidelines

Unread postby madach » Thu Mar 30, 2006 9:57 am

Bigmouth wrote:
madach wrote:One of the most important things in photography is composition.


Is the composition of a particular photo not a personal 'feeling'?

You're absolutely right. The composition guidelines that I've given are exactly that, guidelines. The pictures that really stand out are often the ones where the guidelines have been broken....but they have often been broken on purpose! You can only break guidelines on purpose if you at least know the basics guidelines, and that's exactly what I outlined in my post.


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