Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 1 of 13
 [ 184 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 13  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Chacma Baboon
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 8:08 am 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 9:10 pm
Posts: 746
Location: Cape Town
I just find it interesting that millions of photos are taken of most of the animals, but very little of Baboons.
I just love to sit and watch them :D also taking photos of them playing around :wink:

_________________
Deposit paid for Kruger 2015


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 10:12 am 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:38 pm
Posts: 1935
Here are some of the very few baboon photos I have.
Image
Image

_________________
"The measure of life is not its duration but its donation." - Peter Marshall
www.flickr.com/groups/birdssa


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 11:06 am 
Offline
Honorary Virtual Ranger
Honorary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 5:42 pm
Posts: 17943
Location: Red sand, why do I keep thinking of red sand?
Only 3% of my photo's feature baboons, and of those something like 20% feature too fast moving ones.
/Note to self: Keep an eye on your shuttertime!

But I have some that are presentable, even though it was raining:
Image
Image
Image
Image

_________________
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 11:22 am 
Nice pics DuQues 8)

Maybe there is something wrong with me :? I love taking photos of baboons. :D
Some of my favourites:

Image

Image

Image

Image


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 9:12 pm 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2005 9:02 pm
Posts: 17118
Location: mind in SA, body in The Netherlands
Love baboons. Always interaction. A few pics
Love this one. Flea me now :twisted:
Image

Sunrise at sunset
Image

Little one trying to hide
Image

_________________
Submit your Images


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2005 11:06 pm 
Online
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 19, 2005 10:29 pm
Posts: 1042
Location: Berlin - Germany
I like them too
Here some of my pics :cam:

Cape Of Good Hope 2000
I think, he didn't like white cars :D

Image

Augrabies 2001 on a trail

Image

_________________
:hmz: Thinking about the next trip :hmz:
2014 TR from KNP


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2005 9:15 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger

Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2005 4:30 pm
Posts: 145
I took a photo of this baboon screaming because his got a pole stuck in his........
Image
Just kidding he was yawning :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Chacma Baboon
Unread postPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2006 4:41 pm 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger

Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 5:57 pm
Posts: 5031
Chacma Baboon (Papio cynocephalus ursinus)

Classification
Order: Primates
Family: Cercopithecidae
Genus: Papio

Other names
Afrikaans: Kaapse bobbejaan
French: Cynocéphale de Chacma
German: Bärenpavian
Dutch: Beerbaviaan
Portuguese: Babuíno

The Chacma Baboon has a body length of up to 115 cm and a weight from 15 to 31 kg, it is the largest and heaviest baboon species. Chacma baboons have dark yellowish-grey to dark brown and almost black fur with a long snout and unlike other baboons, the males do not have a mane. They have long 22- to 34-inch tails, which they carry like riding whips.
Its hands and feet are wide with stubby fingers and toes. Its thumb and forefinger are fully opposable with precision grip. Adult males have sharp canines measuring 2 1/2 inches long.

Habitat
Chacma baboons inhabit Southern Africa. The species inhabits woodlands, steppe, highland grasslands and savannas, where water is readily available.

In 1986, a troop of chacma baboons was found living in the heart of the Namib desert - the most arid environment known to be inhabited by a non-human primate (the annual rainfall is only 27mm). In 1992, the troop went without water for 116 days, eating figs for moisture. bbc.co.uk

Diet
Chacma baboons mainly eat fruit, though leaves make up a big part of their diet. They also eat flowers, roots, grasses, bark, twigs, sap, tubers, bulbs, mushrooms, lichens, aquatic plants, seeds, shoots, buds, invertebrates, and small vertebrates, such as gazelle. Chacma baboons forage by shuffling along the ground as they root for grasses and other food.

Social Life
Males disperse from their natal groups, while females remain in their home ranges. Chacma baboons live in troops. The troop size varies from eight members to 200 members, but typically involves 30 to 40 baboons. They are promiscuous, and males often fight over females. Females generally have one to three "consorts" from whom to mate with.
Females give birth to a single offspring. Young are born with bright pink skin and black hair. By the age of 6 months, they have their adult coloration.
Male consorts help care for infants in terms of carrying and grooming, and will come to the defense of their female when attacked by members of another troop. They also become foster parents when the mother dies.
When threatened, chacma baboons have been known to mob predators, such as leopards. Sometimes the predator is severely injured.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Traffic Control
Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 6:32 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2005 8:18 am
Posts: 121
Location: RSA
New staff appointment

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Chacma Baboon
Unread postPosted: Sun Mar 12, 2006 4:36 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2005 10:24 am
Posts: 210
Location: Kempton Park
We saw some birdnests floating on Sunset dam. Quite funny when a croc came to investigate. He would slowly surface from underneath - then go down again only to sufacle a few inches forward & then letting it slide down from it's head down to it's back.

Later that afternoon we found the culprit - just as funny. Must be one of the locals because it kept watching the water surface closely - must have known about the crocs.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Mar 13, 2006 6:17 am 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 3:28 pm
Posts: 653
Location: Bloemfontein, RSA
Very interesting. The baboon would be after anything edible. This one seems like an expert.

_________________
To change ones life start immideately. Do it flamboyantly. No exceptions.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2006 11:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 7:40 pm
Posts: 196
The first week of February I saw the same thing. I did not see the baboon eating something. The next morning a crocodile came to the tree to investigate but nothing happened.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2006 6:23 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 07, 2005 10:24 am
Posts: 210
Location: Kempton Park
I know it's not clear from the photo, but we actually saw the baboon taking chicks out of the nests and then discarding the then empty nests into the dam.

All the time watching out for the croc that she must have sensed are just below the water surface. :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2006 12:18 pm 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger

Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 5:57 pm
Posts: 5031
Vocal communication

two-phase bark: A deep, loud call, emitted by adult males, which is repeated at 2 to 5 second intervals and sounds like "wahoo". This call is emitted when a predator is near especially a feline one. It is also heard when there is inter or intra group aggression between males. It also communicates male presence and arousal.

grunting: This sometimes resembles a two-phase "uh-huh" and generally is soft in nature. This call is a threat call, emitted by the adult male, which can occur before two-phase bark.

screeching: This call consists of high pitched screams which are repeated and may turn to a churring noise when the individual becomes caught. This call is emitted by all age classes and both sexes.

yakking: Short in duration and sounds like a sharp "yak". Fear grimace often accompanies this call. This call is emitted by subadult and adult males and females, and is given by an individual who is withdrawing from a threatening animal.

clicking: This call is chirplike in nature and is emitted by infant and juvenile chacma baboons of both sexes. This is the equivalent of yakking (Estes, 1991).

ick-ooer: A two-phased call with the "ick" coming before the "coo" sound, and given with the lips pursed. it is emitted by infants of both sexes, and is given as an expression of a low-level of fear or distress.

shrill bark: This call is a sound which is single, sharp, and explosive in nature. it is emitted by all chacma baboons except adult males, and functions as an alarm signal especially to a sudden disturbance. Other members of the troop will flee upon hearing this call.

rhythmic grunts: This call is low and soft and is given by all chacma baboons except infants. This call is given when one individual is approaching another and signals friendly intentions.

doglike bark: A high-pitched call and has more quaver and is less staccato than the shrill bark. it's emitted by subadult and adult males and females, and is given when individual or subgroups are separated from the troop.

chattering: This call is nasal in nature and consists of rapid gruntlike sounds. It is emitted by juvenile chacma baboons, and is heard during play.

muffled growl: The mouth is closed and the cheeks puff in and out during this call. This call is emitted by estrus females and occurs during copulation.

Visual communication

tension yawning: This is done by an adult male chacma baboons. The mouth is opened fully to reveal the canines. This is done when a rival group or a predator is approaching.

staring: This display is used as a threat. The eyes are fixed on the stimulus, the eyebrows are raised and the scalp is retracted, the facial skin is also stretched by moving the ears back.

canine display: This is performed by adult male chacma baboons, and is variation upon tension yawning. It serves as a threat display and is given by a lower-ranking male against a higher-ranking one when the higher-ranking individual is with an estrus female or is eating meat. Often eyebrow-raising occurs with this display.

eyebrow-raising: Eyebrow-raising functions as an aggressive gesture.

penile display: This is performed by an adult male, and he will sit with this erect penis in full view. This display is performed while the male is guarding and communicates to other males that an adult male is present in the troop.

fear grimace: The lips are retracted so that the teeth are shown; the teeth are clenched together. This display functions as an appeasement signal to reduce aggression in aggressive encounters.

tooth-grinding: The mouth is closed and the teeth are grinded together. Heard when two males are threatening each other at a close distance.

rapid-glancing: This is when a threatened chacma baboon will turn its head away and look in the opposite direction. It serves to decrease the tension in the situation.

lipsmacking: The lips are protruded, then smacked together repeatedly. It's a reassuring display.

social presenting: This is like presenting, but is done by females and juvenile males towards higher ranking males. This is a submissive display and differs from presenting by the hindquarters being lower. This is also done by a female to another female with a black infant, and she will lip-smack while doing this.

Tactile communication

social grooming: One individual removes parasites and dead skin with their hands from another individual. In this species it generally only occurs between same sex individuals. This is used to reinforce the social bonds.

nose-to-nose greeting: When two individuals meet each other they touch noses as a friendly sign.

social mounting: This is generally a response to social presenting and serves to signal a friendly reassurance. This is also seen during aggressive encounters.

Source


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Baboon "kanibalism" or discipline gone wrong?
Unread postPosted: Mon May 29, 2006 4:44 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 10:13 pm
Posts: 1904
Location: Slightly Off Center
Hi guys... Longish post but bear with me.

Saw a troop of babons this weekend between Skukuza and Tshokwane. We were not really looking as we had seen many that day allready.

We had to get to an almost standstill as they were sitting in the road and then - without warning - a LARGE mail grabbed a little one and killed it. I mean bit it dead.

Now as luck would have it I didnt have my camera as it is in for a servcice. I did try to take pictures with a cell but that just plain straight didnt work.

I have seen something like this on 50/50 once were one fo the resident "expert" guys aid that baboons might do this and actually eat the baby baboon due to a lake of protien in the diet etc etc etc. The thing here was that the Large baboon did not seem interested in eating the smaller one at all. He sortof poked and pressed the body and then turned his attention to what I can only assume was the mother and a few other baboons "going ape". (Pardont he pun)

I am not an expert but it certainly did not seem like he was interested in eating the little one but it was more a case of "discipline gone wrong" and perhaps he didnt mean to kill the smaller one. He did seem rather bemosed at the dead baboon after he had done the deed.

The area was green and there certainly did not seem to be a lack of food in the vacinity.

Any ideas and comments on this?

Baffers

_________________
You gotta be careful: don't say a word to nobody about nothing anytime ever!
I don't pretend to be captain weird. I just do what I do.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 184 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 13  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by Kokkewiet at 08:25:02 Submitted by enrico at 05:28:52 Submitted by RonelMentz at 22:02:55 Submitted by Kokkewiet at 08:53:41