Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 1 of 2
 [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Successful Predators
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 8:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 2:37 pm
Posts: 35
The spotted hyena is a very successful predator.
It is in fact a far more successful predator than the lion.
It is often the lion that scavenges food from the hyena rather than the other way around.
Prey species allow the hyena to get closer than any other predator.
Scientists don't know why this is the case.
A reason for their success is that prey species are unmindful of the hyena's staying power and drop from exhaustion within 1.5 - 5 kms.
Hyenas can gallop at a top speed of 60 kph for up to 3 kms, can maintain 40 - 50 kph for several kms more and can lope tirelessly at 10 kph mile after mile.
Hyenas eat as fast as possible and compete for food in this way at a kill rather than fighting.
The hyena can consume up to a third of its own weight compared to a quarter by the lion.
The quarreling of hyenas around a kill serves to attract other clan members.
Where there are fewer hyenas around a kill (eg. 2), they will feed in silence.
Other predators waste up to 40% of their kills, whereas the spotted hyena eats virtually everything.
Hunting success rates for a single hyena is about 26% (75% of their hunting is solitary) and for more than one hyena they are successful 43% of the time.

The lion can maintain a top speed of 50 - 60 kph for a distance of 100m.
The success rate of solitary hunters is only 17 - 19% compared to 30% when two or more lions are involved. Lions apparently don't learn to take wind direction into account during a hunt (this according to research).

I have twice witnessed packs of hyenas hunting zebra close to Satara on a night drive and close to Sirheni on a night drive.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 10:04 pm 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2005 10:58 pm
Posts: 198
Location: NOT in KRUGER!!!
Very interesting Bothali. I always thought all Hyaenas were scavengers, but this is evidently not the case. :? Wikipedia has information on Hyaenas that supports your points:
Quote:
Hyenas are also highly intelligent predators, even more intelligent than the lions (some scientists claim they are of equal intelligence to certain apes). One indication of hyena intelligence is that hyenas will move their kills closer to each other to protect them from scavengers; another indication is their strategic hunting methods.

and
Quote:
Despite common belief, only some species belonging to this family are scavengers: while the brown and the striped hyena derive most of their diets from scavenging, the spotted hyena is not only a real predator, but also the most effective predator on the African savannah. The Aardwolf usually eat insects like termites.

_________________
KRAZY about KRUGER!!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 10:12 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 18, 2005 9:55 pm
Posts: 769
Spotted hyaena are very adaptable animals which will adept to the local situation. In the Makuleke Contract Park in the North of the KNP the spotted hyaena is considered to be the top predator due to the low lion density. Down South in the KNP I suspect that spotted hyaenas are mainly scavengers due to a high lion density.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 12:08 am 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 12:28 am
Posts: 14230
Location: Pretoria, RSA
As in many cases it is a matter of interpretation of the facts.

I would not at all dis-agree with the opinion that Bothali put on the screen!

Spotted Hyena are indeed very capable predators, and in areas of high density they are often the main predator in a given area!

This does however not change the fact that they are also scavengers! It is a well known fact that they actively scavenge, and will even follow animals such as Leopard, Cheetah and Wild dog to scavenge their kills.

In fact most other predators are also scavengers!

Madach makes a valuable point in pointing out that Hyena often play different roles according to what circumstance dictate.

To state that: "the spotted hyena is not only a real predator, but also the most effective predator on the African savannah" is purely a matter of interpretation. How do you judge which is the most effective predator? Different sets of criteria would give you different answers!

Hyena are truly wonderful animals, and do not deserve the "bad press" they often get! :wink:

_________________
Imberbe = Combretum imberbe = Leadwood = Hardekool = The spirit of the Wildernis!

Want to know more about the SANParks Honorary Rangers? Visit www.sanparkshr.org


One positive deed is worth more than a thousand critical words.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 12:25 am 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 18, 2005 9:55 pm
Posts: 769
Tabs wrote:
madach wrote:
Down South in the KNP I suspect that spotted hyaenas are mainly scavengers due to a high lion density.


I am not sure that this is true Madach but am also not prepared to argue the point as you have much more experience than I do of Kruger and the animals that exist in the southern part of the park :cry:

I'm also not sure of it so arguing the point is pointless :lol: The way to make sure is probably to ask Gus Mills.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 12:27 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 11:21 pm
Posts: 150
Location: UK
Wild dogs have a hunting success of between 40 - 85% - I don't know what the figures are for the spotted hyaena as they do not always hunt in packs - I have seen many lone hyaenas on the hunt but I do not believe that wild dogs ever hunt alone - so as far as I am aware the wild dog is the most effective large predator in Africa.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 2:37 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 2:37 pm
Posts: 35
There are many sources that say that wild dogs are the most effective predator in Africa and that this is due to their hunting in packs. From what I can gather, leopards are probably the second most effective followed by hyena.

With regard to lion hunting behaviour, a lot of the research seems to have been done on the Serengeti and elsewhere on the African plains, where the landscape is different and hunting patterns would probably not be the same here.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Animal activity at various times of day...
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 6:53 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:45 pm
Posts: 403
Location: London
I have always been told most of the predators are active in the early morning, evening, and some at night. This makes sense in terms of escaping the midday heat and not hunting at this time. Does this pattern change in the winter though when the midday heat is less oppressive?

_________________
Berg en Dal: 10/08/2014 - 13/08/2014
Satara: 13/08/2014 - 16/08/2014
Croc Bridge: 16/08/2014 - 17/08/2014


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Animal activity at various times of day...
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 7:02 pm 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Posts: 13175
Location: meandering between senility and menopause
FAC Member (2013)
Hi Graham,

a lovely question.

Most predators are opportunistic, think of the domestic cat. They will kill if the opportunity comes their way.

My experience, however, has often been that there has been a certain predictability.

_________________
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Animal activity at various times of day...
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 7:07 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:45 pm
Posts: 403
Location: London
Hmm yes that makes sense. It would be interesting to track Lions and Leopards with gps to see if their daily movements change between summer and winter..

I wonder if the same daily routine pattern applies to other mammals like rhino, elephant etc?

_________________
Berg en Dal: 10/08/2014 - 13/08/2014
Satara: 13/08/2014 - 16/08/2014
Croc Bridge: 16/08/2014 - 17/08/2014


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Animal activity at various times of day...
Unread postPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 7:13 pm 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Posts: 13175
Location: meandering between senility and menopause
FAC Member (2013)
Graham, Wilddog has been the most predictable for me. They have a very definate social structure that helps in the hunt. They also have a high metabolic rate that makes it almost impossible to hunt in the heat of the day.

_________________
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Animal activity at various times of day...
Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 6:48 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:45 pm
Posts: 403
Location: London
Is this the case even in winter when it does not get too hot? Will be up early for Wild dogs every morning!

_________________
Berg en Dal: 10/08/2014 - 13/08/2014
Satara: 13/08/2014 - 16/08/2014
Croc Bridge: 16/08/2014 - 17/08/2014


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Animal activity at various times of day...
Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 7:06 pm 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jan 28, 2007 12:34 pm
Posts: 10800
Location: Bloemfontein
FAC Member (2012)
There are always surprises that awaits. Have seen Honey badger @ 12:00 in summer on the tar road between Lower Sabie and Tshokwane. Animals don't always follow the manual :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Animal activity at various times of day...
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 9:50 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 483
Location: Birmingham - UK (the original and still the best!)
Boorgatspook wrote:
There are always surprises that awaits. Have seen Honey badger @ 12:00 in summer on the tar road between Lower Sabie and Tshokwane. Animals don't always follow the manual :wink:


That's 'cos they daint write the manual :wink:

They (who is 'they' btw?) say that it's a waste of time going on a game drive mid-day - yet my experience is that in winter game is hopping about all day - so predators have probably sussed that out!

_________________
"Birmingham people, you guys take care of us. We have to give you all the respect Birmingham."

(Usain Bolt August 2012)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Animal activity at various times of day...
Unread postPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 11:48 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:31 pm
Posts: 9989
Location: Ballito, KZN North Coast, South Africa
My feelings are that the only predictable thing about animals is the unpredictability!
and I am never not amazed by some happening every time we visit a park.

_________________
Where ever you go, go with all your Heart.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by teddy_rsa at 09:01:57 Submitted by Stampajane at 15:52:41 Submitted by Delene D at 16:45:37 Submitted by Ton&Herma at 13:37:01