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Pafuri Camp

Discuss the different camps and roads of the Kruger National Park
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Unread postby Tabs » Sat Feb 25, 2006 3:35 am

Wow willd57 - what a great adventure and Thank You for sharing it with us! It brought back many great memories :)

Eco-Training is certainly, in my opinion, one of the best ways of experiencing the bush and learning about the animals and the environment.
I have done the GR Eco-T course twice just for the opportunity to walk in the bush every day, never knowing what may be around the next thorn bush or termite mound!
I hope that I will be able to do their Advanced GR course one day -
I think that may be the course that they do at the new camp in Kruger that you mentioned?

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Unread postby johanrebel » Thu Mar 09, 2006 5:04 pm

willd57 wrote: rhino and giraffe have both been introduced to the area where previously they were absent.
I spent ten nights at Pafuri Camp late last month.
The giraffe all ran away shortly after their reintroduction, never to be seen again.
There is single giraffe in the area (which is a contractual national park, not a concession), which is seen on occasion.

One of the reintroduced rhinos has moved south of the Levuvhu, the others mainly hang out in the area between the River and the tar road.
There is a year-round water in the form of a spring in that block, so it hoped the rhinos will settle down and establish a home range there.
The Levuvhu West road to Lanner Gorge via Mangala is the only road in the entire block, although a track at the base of the hills rising at the northern end of the Mangala plain is in the planning stages.
So is a walking trails camp, which will hopefully open in the near future.

I spent a morning with the rhino researchers, whose job it is to locate the rhinos on a daily basis.
They also have to check the western boundary fence every day, to make sure the rhinos do not escape into the former SADF zone along the Limpopo.
Although this is now part of the contractual national park, there is no fence on its western side, so once in there, the rhinos could keep on walking all the way to Musina.

We managed to get to within 10 meters of a rhino cow and calf, but the Mopani bush was so thick that we could not see them, only hear them breathe.

An interesting observation on the local elephant population is that they move out of the area as soon as the first rains come, almost to a man (so to speak).
During my visit there were only two or three bulls left in an area of 24,000 hectares!
It is also quite obvious that elephants stick to the riverine areas in the dry season.
Elephant spoor is very scarce away from the rivers, and the Mopani veld has suffered very little elephant impact.

Local game has become habituated to vehicles very quickly, animals are no longer as skittish as they were only half a year ago.

Poaching used to be rampant in the area.
The Makuleke have set up their own anti-poaching unit (financed by Wilderness Safaris to the tune of R 2 million) which removed over 3,000 snares within the first few months of operations (I can't help but wonder how well the area was patrolled when SANParks were still in charge).

Time constraints prevent me from posting a full report on the lodge and the area.
Suffice to say that it is not only stunningly beautiful, but very different from the rest of the KNP.
The numerous pans large and small on the Limpopo floodplain, fringed by huge and almost pure stands of Northern Lala Palm Hyphaene petersiana are amazing.

Questions welcome.

Johan

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Pafuri Wilderness Camp

Unread postby DuQues » Thu Jun 22, 2006 12:27 pm

Pafuri Wilderness Camp as seen from the S63, across the Luvuvhu river.

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Last edited by DuQues on Tue Aug 29, 2006 1:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread postby arks » Mon Jul 03, 2006 3:40 am

This is my photo of the same spot, but taken in late April. However, what I'm wondering is whether this is the luxury Parfuri camp or the camp used for the Eco-Training? Does anyone know?

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Unread postby DuQues » Mon Jul 03, 2006 8:54 am

It's the luxury camp. The ecotraining camp is located more north and west.
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

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Unread postby DinkyBird » Sun Mar 30, 2008 12:58 pm

Hi bigstrontium - here are some topics on these forums relating to Makulele Concession and Pafuri Camp which might also help you with info :D
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Re: Pafuri Wilderness Camp

Unread postby Kingfisha » Tue Feb 10, 2009 3:04 pm

Hi
I see this is a very old posting.
But I have to say that I had the honour last year to stay at Pafuri Camp for 4 nights.
It was ABSOLUTELY fantastic!!
The staff were so accommodating (we wanted to do a lot of bird watching) and the luxury tent accommodation was out of this world.
We did game watching from our deck - Elephant, Nyala, kudu, bushbuck, warthog, baboon, eland, Duiker, leopard, etc. etc.

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Re: Moderately upscale places to stay in or around KNP

Unread postby Mant » Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:55 am

Hi,

Here is some info on Pafuri Lodge:

Pafuri Camp lies on a gentle bend along the northern bank of the Luvuvhu River, under the shade of enormous ebony and nyala berry trees.
The Luvuvhu draws many different animals to its waters, from elephant, buffalo and nyala to wading birds and fish eagles.
The main deck has ample room to sit and watch the daily passage of wildlife to and from the river, and the swimming pool is perfect for cooling off in the heat of the day.
The dining and lounge areas are open to the river view, and a lower-level terrace is perfect for watching sunrise with a cup of freshly brewed coffee, or sipping sundowners as the sky darkens and the crickets begin to sing.

The camp has 20 tents, six of which are family tents sleeping four people.
Each tent is on a raised platform two metres off the ground and joined by elevated walkways.
This allows wildlife to move undisturbed to and from the river, and also catches the breeze moving through the tree canopy overhead.
The bathroom is en suite with both indoor and outdoor showers for those who would like to bathe under the stars!

The main area, with its large decks and open-sided lounge and dining rooms, forms the centre of the camp. The tents are spread out along the riverbank on either side effectively creating two “wings” – Pafuri East and West.

The colourful fabrics with which the camp is furnished have been made locally and reflect the culture of the Makuleke community.
The décor has been designed to represent elements of the local heritage and history, its unique stone walls evocative of the famous Thulamela culture that existed in the area in the 1500s.

Pafuri Camp blends into its surroundings and offers a superb all-round experience.
The diverse Pafuri region forms an integral part of anyone’s visit to the Kruger National Park.
The Pafuri Wilderness Trail is a wonderful alternative for exploring this fascinating area on foot.

Pafuri Camp is found in the private 24 000-hectare Makuleke Concession at the extreme north of the Kruger National Park.
The Pafuri “triangle” is created by the intersection of two great rivers – the ancient and dying Limpopo and the young and powerful Luvuvhu River.
The latter is actively carving its way through the sandstone of the escarpment, in the process creating the impressive Lanner Gorge.
Their intersection forms the meeting point of three countries – South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

The Concession is home to large herds of buffalo, as well as hippo, white rhino, lion, leopard and high seasonal concentrations of elephant.
The Limpopo and Luvuvhu Rivers host the highest density of nyala in Kruger and species such as eland, Sharpe’s grysbok and yellow-spotted rock dassie, which are difficult to find further south in the Park.

A drive along the floodplain and riverine fringe of either of the two large rivers usually produces good general game in the form of nyala, impala, greater kudu, zebra, chacma baboon, waterbuck, warthog and perhaps grey duiker or bushbuck.
Patience and a little luck may yield the more elusive residents of the area such as lion, leopard and sable.

The area has long been regarded as something of a Mecca for southern African birdwatchers.
Some species are found nowhere else in South Africa and the serious birder will revel in being able to find Böhm’s and Mottled Spinetails, Racket-tailed Roller, Three-banded Courser, Arnot’s Chat, Black-throated Wattle-Eye and Pel’s Fishing-Owl.

The aura of human history is particularly prevalent, with cultural landmarks such as the ancient Thulamela civilisation,
Early Stone Age sites and the more recent signs of Makuleke habitation. Crooks’ Corner at the confluence of the Limpopo and Luvuvhu Rivers is redolent of long-ago hunters and colourful characters who searched for adventure, as well as the smoking fires and dwellings of the Makuleke villages.
It is this unique aspect as well as a combination of phenomenal diversity and spectacular scenery that makes this area unlike any other in Kruger.

Location

Situated in the 24 000-hectare Makuleke concession in northern Kruger National Park.
The camp is situated on a bend on the northern bank of the Luvuvhu River.

Child policy

Children of 6 years and older are welcome.

Accommodation

Numbers of tents
Pafuri consists of 20 tents divided into Pafuri East – 7 tents and Pafuri West – 13 tents.

Pafuri East
3 x twin bedded tents
2 x double tents
2 x family tents – accommodates 4 guests
Pafuri West
6 x twin bedded tents
3 x double tents
4 x family tents – accommodates 4 guests
The camp can accommodate a maximum of 52 guests in 20 tents some of which can accommodate families of up to 4 guests.

Tent details

20 East African-style Meru tents – 6 of which can be used as family units.
Tents are en-suite and are under a shaded canopy on elevated boardwalks.
Safe in each tent.

Camp Description

Dining and bar area are under a canopy of majestic ebony trees.
Dinners are served on wooden decks overlooking the river or the pool or indoors under thatch.
Large swimming pool overlooking the river on the eastern side of the camp.
There is also a small boma.

Activities

Guests can take part in guided activities in the concession or can self-drive in and around the Kruger National Park in their own vehicles on Park roads. However, self-driving cannot take place anywhere in the Makuleke Concession except on the main access road into and through the area.

Summer / winter schedule

Early morning wake up – summer 05h00 / winter 05h30
Pre-game drive breakfast – summer 05h30 / winter 06h00
Depart game drive – summer 05h45 - 06h00 / winter 06h30 - 07h00 depending on weather
Brunch – summer 10h00 / winter 10h30
Afternoon Tea/High tea – summer 15h30 – 16h00 / winter 15h00
Depart afternoon drive – summer 16h00 – 16h30 / winter 15h30
Dinner – summer from about 20h00 / winter from about 19h30

Drinks Policy

The camp offers a fully stocked bar with a good selection of South African wines. Costs of drinks are on the guests’ account and must be settled directly at the camp.

Electricity & Water

Power from generator and 220-volt power inverted from a battery bank.
Constant 220-volt power to rooms for battery charging, razors, fans etc.
Potable water to the camp comes from 2 strong boreholes.

Laundry Policy

Same-day laundry facility is available at a charge.

Extras Payment

Extras can be paid for by cash, MasterCard, Visa, Amex and Diners Club. Cheques are not accepted. Travellers’ cheques are also accepted.

I recommend that you try out Pafuri Lodge. :)

Samantha

Richprins

Re: Pafuri Picnic Spot

Unread postby Richprins » Tue Jan 26, 2010 7:55 pm

Just some info:

While Pafuri is the most remote spot in the Park, times have changed, and there are some places close at hand that should be able to at least provide some airconditioned "resting" space in the event of ANY medical emergency...

There are a couple of lodges nearby, one just across the Luvhuvhu bridge...I'm sure they have some contingency plans...

Also, there is the National border post nearby, with a large police presence, so they would surely be able to provide assistance!

The new Ranger's post is also very near that, with complete communications and aircon!

I would suggest the latter, just turn right within sight of the border post, and keep going straight.

Maybe an emergency agreement can be made with the lodge?

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Pafuri

Unread postby Carole » Tue Oct 05, 2010 1:04 pm

Hi there,

May I ask if Pafuri camp is privately owned only?
Prices I have seen are R950 per person per night which includes all meals, drives, walks etc. It looks wonderful however!

Just wondering if Sanparks do accommodation at Pafuri?

Many thanks.

Carole.

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Re: Pafuri

Unread postby Shi » Tue Oct 05, 2010 1:17 pm

Hi Carole,

Yes Pafuri is a privately owned concession in the park :thumbs_up: Your rate looks FANTASTIC...I will be staying there for two nights in November and the rate was ALOT more :hmz:


This is the information that I got from Pafuri once my booking was confirmed

Location
• Situated in the 24 000-hectare Makuleke Concession in northern Kruger National Park.
• On the northern bank of the Luvuvhu River.
Children of 6 years and older are welcome
Accommodation
Numbers of tents
Pafuri consists of 20 tents divided into Pafuri East – 7 tents and Pafuri West – 13 tents.
Pafuri East
• 3 x twin bedded tents
• 2 x double tents
• 2 x family tents – accommodates 4 guests
Pafuri West
• 6 x twin bedded tents
• 3 x double tents
• 4 x family tents – accommodates 4 guests
The camp can accommodate a maximum of 52 guests in 20 tents, some of which can accommodate families of up to 4
guests. Alternately groups or parties wanting a more private experience can book sole use of East camp where they will then
have the use of their own dining area and pool.
Tent details:
• 20 Meru-style tents.
• Tents are en-suite and are under a shaded canopy on elevated boardwalks.
• Body wash, Body lotion, Shampoo & Conditioner, torch, Africa Geographic and Birds & Birding magazines and chuba
game are supplied in each room.
• Fan in each tent
• Safe in each tent
Camp Description
• Main dining and bar area are under a canopy of majestic ebony trees.
• There is a smaller thatched boma/dining area for parties wanting to book sole use of Pafuri East
• Dinners are served on the wooden deck overlooking the river or the pool or indoors under thatch.
• Large swimming pool overlooking the river at West camp as well as a smaller plunge pool at East camp
Game Viewing
Large herds of elephant are present during the drier months while several herds of buffalo are resident. There are resident
prides of lion and the Luvuvhu Riparian System supports a healthy population of leopard. On the easternmost boundary at
Crooks’ Corner the Luvuvhu supports a large population of hippo and crocodile. The Makuleke Concession is one of the few
places in the Kruger where there is a good chance of eland and Sharpe’s grysbok, and is regarded as the birding hotspot of
South Africa with specialities such as Pel’s Fishing-Owl, Wattle-Eyed Flycatcher, Tropical Boubou, Three-banded Courser
and Racket-tailed Rollers.
Activities
Possible summer / winter schedule:
Summer:
05h00 Wake Up
05h30 Tea & Coffee
06h00 Depart Game Drive
09h30 Brunch
15h30 Afternoon Tea & Coffee
16h00 Depart Game Drive
20h00 Dinner
Winter:
05h30 Wake Up
06h00 Tea & Coffee
06h30 Depart Game Drive
10h00 Brunch
15h00 Afternoon Tea & Coffee
15h30 Depart Game Drive
19h30 Dinner
Guided activities on offer are:
• Guided morning walking and birding safaris ± 3 to 4 hours
• Guided safaris overlooking Lanner Gorge ± 4 to 5 hours
• Guided morning and afternoon game drives. The afternoon game drive will include a night drive. ± 3 hours
• Shorter guided walks ± 2 hours.
• Specialist birding walk/drive ± 3 hours.
• Specialist safaris on the history and archaeology of the area ± 2 hours.
Drinks Policy
The camp offers a fully stocked bar with a good selection of South African wines. The cost of all drinks are for the guest’s
account and must be settled directly at the camp.
Electricity & Water
• Power from generator and 220-volt power inverted from a battery bank
• Constant 220-volt power to rooms for battery charging, razors etc.
• Potable water to the camp comes from 2 strong boreholes
• Overhead fans in the main dining area have 24-hour power.
• Plug points are available in each tent so that sleep apnoea machines may be used.
Laundry Policy
Same day laundry facility is available at a charge.
Extras Payment
Extras can be paid for by cash, MasterCard, Visa, Amex and Diner’s Club. Foreign currency and rand travellers’ cheques are
also accepted. Cheques and debit card payments are not accepted.

Hope this helps :thumbs_up:
Shi
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Nov 13-14 Lower Sabie, 15-18 Satara, 19-22 Skukuza,22-27 Biyamiti
Dec 24-27 Biyamiti, 28-29 Orpen, 30-31 Skukuza
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TR March 2010

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Re: Pafuri

Unread postby DuQues » Tue Oct 05, 2010 1:19 pm

Carole, SANParks doesn't "do the accomodation" for Pafuri camp.
It's part of the Makuleke concession.
The concession is owned by the Makuleke Community, displaced from the area under the apartheid regime, and the camp is a joint venture between the Makuleke and Wilderness Safaris.

Have a look on these pages.
It is a fantastic area.
Arriving currently: The photos from our trip! Overhere! :yaya:

Feel free to use any of these additional letters to correct the spelling of words found in the above post: a-e-t-n-d-i-o-s-m-l-u-y-h-c

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Re: Pafuri

Unread postby ndloti » Tue Oct 05, 2010 1:57 pm

One can drive there with ones own passenger motor vehicle .
KNP is sacred. I am opposed to the modernisation of Kruger and from the depths of my soul long for the Kruger of yesteryear! 1000+km on foot in KNP incl 56 wild trails.200+ nights in the wildernessndloti-indigenous name for serval.

Richprins

Re: Pafuri

Unread postby Richprins » Tue Oct 05, 2010 7:57 pm

DuQues wrote:The concession is owned by the Makuleke Community


It is not really "owned", in a strict sense, as the area still forms part of Kruger and the veld is managed entirely by SANPARKS, as per the Land Claim agreement.

A part of the revenue forthcoming from lodge activities goes to the chiefs involved, and then to the community! :thumbs_up:

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Re: Pafuri

Unread postby johanrebel » Wed Oct 06, 2010 2:55 pm

DuQues wrote:and you can happily drive the roads in the consession.

You may most definitely not.
The general public can drive the tar road between Pafuri Gate and Luvuvhu Bridge and guests with a confirmed reservation for Pafuri Camp can drive the gravel access road from Luvuvhu Bridge to camp.
All other roads are strictly off limits, only official game viewing vehicles from Pafuri Camp and The Outpost are allowed to use them.

But yes, the area is fantastic, and Pafuri Camp comes warmly recommended.
Nothing else in Kruger can even remotely compare.

Johan


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