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Mammals: Q & A

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Cape Warthog

Unread postby 007 » Sat Dec 12, 2009 2:22 pm

Does anybody have any information on the genetic integrity of the extinct "Cape Warthog". Was the Cape Warthog really a distinct species only based on dentition? What would have restricted the Common Warthog from moving into the Eastern and Western Cape (where today they are increasingly becoming more common)?

Any information would be appreciated!!

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Re: Re-introduction of Mammals Into the Namaqua NP

Unread postby Tom124 » Sat Dec 12, 2009 6:18 pm

Hi 007 and welcome to the forums!

It would be very nice to see a wider variety of mammals in the SANParks, but it is a risky thing to do. Even if the mammal in question has lived in the place in question before, it does not mean it will still be able to live there due to droughts etc.

Also, it would probably mean that the other flora and fauna would suffer. I.e. over-grazing. Animals adapt to their habitats and habitats adapt to the animals living on them, so it is in the best interests of our national parks to intervene as little as possible.
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Re: Cape Warthog

Unread postby Wild about cats » Sat Dec 12, 2009 8:34 pm

Hi 007 :)

I found these great sources about the Cape Wathog, hope this helps!!

WikiAnswers
Wikipedia
ScienceDirect - genetics of two different warthogs

Wikipedia wrote:Some common differences between the Cape Warthog and the extant warthog, P. Africanus, include:

-The skull is smaller, but broader
-The frontal area of the zygomatic arch is thickened by internal sinuses and is swollen into a round hollow knob in front of the jugal-squamosal suture (in P. Africanus, the zygomatic arch may be robust, but it is not thickened, and there is no knob
-There are never incisors in Phacochoerus aethiopicus, yet in a regular warthog, there are two incisors in the upper jaw and six in the lower
-In the Cape Warthog, the large third molars and different from those of P. Africanus because no roots would be formed by the time all the enamel columns have gone into wear
-In a typical warthog has two spherical pits in the back of their skull, and the Cape Warthog has them too, but they are many times larger
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Re: Cape Warthog

Unread postby 007 » Tue Dec 15, 2009 3:38 pm

Thanx Wild about cats, some very interesting info!!!

I saw they separated the two species on dental and skull diferences, but interestingly enough there are three different general skull patterns within humans and yet humans are all the same species.

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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby Jungle Junkie » Mon Jan 25, 2010 4:50 pm

Hi there

This question may be somewhat off the subject and if so please direct me to correct thread.

Could you please tell me the correct plural of the mammals nmaes.
eg. Is it Five Zebra or Zebras, the same goes for the rest - Elephant, Lion etc.?

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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby onewithnature » Wed Jan 27, 2010 4:12 am

Hi JJ

When you're talking about mammals as individual entities, you refer to them with the plural: so, "There were 5 lions in the pride" or "Three mongooses ran side by side". However, when you refer to the species as a whole, you use the singular: "So, lion and leopard are both carnivores" or "Elephant prefer to wallow in the heat of day". But, "3 elephants preferred to wallow in Sunset Dam at midday". Does that help?
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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby Elsa » Sat Aug 14, 2010 11:25 am

I was watching a programme on TV yesterday where they were talking about a
Topi but it looked exactly like a Tsessebe to me.
It did have a young one at foot, so, is this another sub-species of Tsessebe or is it what the young are called?
I did check in my Mammal book and they were not too specific! :?
Thanks for any help.
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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby BushFairy » Sat Aug 14, 2010 11:35 am

They are three seperate species of the Damaliscus genus. The Topi, Bangweula Tsessebe and Common Tsessebe. They were all once considered to be the same species with slight differences according to distribution (so therefore habitat), but they are now considered three genetically seperate species.
Topi - D. korrigum
Bangweula Tsessebe - D. superstes
Common Tsessebe - D. lunatus

The Topi and the Common Tsessebe are VERY similar in appearance, despite the fact that they are genetically different!

Hope this helps :D
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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby Elsa » Sat Aug 14, 2010 11:58 am

Yes, it does, thanks very much BushFairy. :thumbs_up:

So it seems it's just a question of location as to which species is where?

Must be similar to the various species of Zebra that occur throughout Africa.
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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby anne-marie » Sat Aug 14, 2010 12:31 pm

the Topi I saw in Kenya and Tanzania was, for me, the same like the Tsessebe I saw in Kruger :wink: (Damaliscus...)
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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby hrampf » Thu Oct 07, 2010 10:21 pm

Hi, just returned from kruger-saw a white rhino bull at renosterpan just south of afsaal on 30th september with nasty looking skin lesions on abdomen, legs and face-was grazing happily-reported it to staff but would love to know if anyone has any ideas on what was wrong with it and if any action had to be taken? was told that a ranger was being sent out to look at it? Anyone any ideas???

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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby Imberbe » Thu Oct 07, 2010 10:46 pm

:hmz: Sure it wasn't a black rhino?

I ask this, because such lesions are well known in black rhino. It is caused by a parasitic worm that lives on the skin of black rhino, and which is transported by biting flies. It does not occur on white rhino.

The lesions are not serious and wil appear only certain times of the year, when the flies and the worms are active.
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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby BushFairy » Thu Oct 07, 2010 10:53 pm

That's very interesting Imberbe!! They say you learn something new everyday - certainly true on this forum!!!

The problem in this case is that the rhino was apparently grazing out in the open in the middle of the day - this is really rare behaviour for Black Rhino. Are you sure it wasn't a White Rhino that had been burnt?? I recall that in someones TR they mentioned a badly burnt White Rhino hanging around Renosterpan that rangers were monitoring although it seemed to be recovering as it was eating and drinking! - Will try and find who spoke about this?
Last edited by BushFairy on Thu Oct 07, 2010 10:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby hrampf » Thu Oct 07, 2010 10:56 pm

Hi guys, appreciate the answers-100% certain a white rhino-interesting the story about a burnt rhino-had not thought of that-would fit with distribution of lesions on body.........

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Re: Mammals: Q & A

Unread postby ww29 » Tue Oct 23, 2012 9:36 am

Hi Forumites

i have just come back from a wonderful (albeit wet) weekend at the Kruger. While there my mom and i noticed how many of the impala were sitting down in the bush / grass. Is this because of the rain? Why do they do this? my mom and i haven't noticed it before (we normally go to Kruger in the dry winter season) so is the behaviour related to the weather.

Thanks! told my mom is one of the forumits doesn't know the answer then there is no answer!

ww29


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