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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 8:24 pm 
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I think I need to klap 'n toon... (Translation: Clap a toe)... i.e. hastily going somewhere...

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 8:45 pm 
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that is so right BB, when I first heard nownow and the odd (to me) "ahh shame"I was puzzled

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 8:57 pm 
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Micetta wrote:
My question probably has little to do with South Africa english, but I would like to know why so few posters use the plural, especially noted in TRs. You see a pic of a herd of any animal and the description goes; 'we saw lots of giraffe, elephant, waterbuck, mongoose, rhino, hippo' etc.'


- I asked the same question and OWN kindly replied with this:-

Quote:
When you're talking about mammals as individual entities, you refer to them with the plural: so, "There were 5 lions in the pride" or "Three mongooses ran side by side". However, when you refer to the species as a whole, you use the singular: "So, lion and leopard are both carnivores" or "Elephant prefer to wallow in the heat of day". But, "3 elephants preferred to wallow in Sunset Dam at midday". Does that help?


JJ

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 10:57 pm 
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Takkies [running shoes] and bakkies [pick up trucks] are words my kids still use after leaving Botswana 20 years ago......


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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 11:09 pm 
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The one I like is Skinner...as in info or probably more like gossip..perhaps?
So This is where I get the skinner of all the Saffie/english words? Hey?

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 11:31 pm 
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You check Lockie, we larny chinas dont skinner my boet,..thats for the moegoes and mamparas who are looking for a curry klap.

Some of those skollies one comes across can give one a real skrik..and will even tune you grief whilst you are grazing a bunny chow in your bakkie.

( http://www.southafrica.info/travel/advice/saenglish.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; covers most of what Ive written!)

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 11:51 pm 
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EISH!!....which I only recently found out is pronounced aaiish...

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 1:11 pm 
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'Eish' as in 'yinnahhhhhhh Piet'!!!!

(Means about the same thing even if your name isnt Piet!)

Actually, come to think of it, 'sherbet!!! could have been the fore runner to Eish y'know....

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 3:37 pm 
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Jungle Junkie wrote:
Micetta wrote:
My question probably has little to do with South Africa english, but I would like to know why so few posters use the plural, especially noted in TRs. You see a pic of a herd of any animal and the description goes; 'we saw lots of giraffe, elephant, waterbuck, mongoose, rhino, hippo' etc.'


- I asked the same question and OWN kindly replied with this:-

Quote:
When you're talking about mammals as individual entities, you refer to them with the plural: so, "There were 5 lions in the pride" or "Three mongooses ran side by side". However, when you refer to the species as a whole, you use the singular: "So, lion and leopard are both carnivores" or "Elephant prefer to wallow in the heat of day". But, "3 elephants preferred to wallow in Sunset Dam at midday". Does that help?

JJ
That is probably the grammatical rule, which is the same in most languages, but my question was why many mites do not use plural when it should be used. Maybe they do not like the letter "s"


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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 4:14 pm 
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From an Afrikaans speaking china, why do you Engelse refer to "peeps'. At first I didn't understand what peeps mean, because it sounded like a toilet break to me, like in " we have to stop now because I want to go to the toilet to "piepie" "Peeps" could have been all the people standing in line to go for a "piepie"

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 4:34 pm 
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Rooies wrote:
From an Afrikaans speaking china, why do you ....

:huh: :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:35 pm 
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I think I am right in saying china meaning friend or pal comes from the rhyming slang china plate = mate

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:44 pm 
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Dots, I wonder if that one is on your web site A perfect example of "development of a language" And we are also expected to understand it?


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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:48 pm 
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Location: another national park.. in England
It originated in London a cockney thing ( to be a cockney you had to be born within the sound of Bow Bells) a church bell in a place called St Mary-le-Bow Church in Cheapside, London..Try this my old china

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa English - a guide for other mother tongues
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 19, 2010 6:59 pm 
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During high school I had a teacher that actually had fun introducing us to Cockney and I even manged to talk with a lovely cockney accent I have not tried for ages.


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