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Tutorial: Different ways to do a subject

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bert
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Tutorial: Different ways to do a subject

Unread postby bert » Tue May 10, 2005 9:36 pm

Hi,
The nice remarks on my mouse by some of u started me thinking. I do not intend to give photolessons
In my small overpopulated country we are not blessed with
virgin landscapes and easy to shoot big animals. Therefore
we are forced to try to photograph without human interference.
That means u must take the time when trying to frame a object
and i have learned to try to do different things with a object.

In Holland, due to the lack of abovementioned we do a lot of
macro. Then u can show the small wonders and isolate it from
its background (no human activities)

I will try to demonstrate with three pics of the same mouse.



Image
This was were i found it. 24 mm lens. I did put nicely on the tree.

Image
This is with a 100 mm macro. Same mouse, same tree.
This is what i call a headon shot. Tried to do something with the angle from where i took the shot. This mouse is DEAD

Image
The same mouse, but arranged. Put it somewhere else. Another angle again and putting some coloured leaves here and there. Now its is a beautifull mouse. Taking a nap :wink:

One thing when doing macro. We call it weeding in the garden.
There is always something in the way, or a some distracting object in the frame.

Macro is a lot of fun (hard work) and u can do it almost anywhere.

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bwana
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Unread postby bwana » Wed May 11, 2005 6:36 am

Thanks Bert, a nice lesson in composition. I love the green moss and trees! (I hope you were using gloves :lol: )

bwana
All your snakes are belong to us.

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francoisd
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Unread postby francoisd » Wed May 11, 2005 10:10 am

Thanx Bert, I'll definitly try out different compositions of the same subject in future.

Also nice to see "Rustende muis" again :D
"The measure of life is not its duration but its donation." - Peter Marshall
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bert
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Unread postby bert » Thu May 12, 2005 4:03 pm

DuQues wrote:What Bert has forgotten to tell (because he does not even think about it anymore) is that not only did he position the mouse, but himself as well.

Look at the three photo's, which do you like best?
No 1, from slightly above;
No 2, almost at eyelevel;
No 3, at eyelevel?

Always try to shoot at eyelevel, or slightly below (honoring your subject) unless you need to depreciate your subject (i.e. a bag of garbage, litter etc.).

No need to say that this works with photographing little children as well..


Txs DQ
Also works with the pets

That is one reason i like to do wild animals from a sedan car instead of one with high clearance. It doenst matter when the animal is quite far away. But with those close to u, like impalas and even ellies you can show the animal in all its grandure.

If you can get hold of Frans Lanting books u will see what i mean. He was one of the first to put this in practise .
Nowadays lots of wildlifephotographers do this. With wide-angle lenses 20 - 28 mm. Nearly every famous one has a ellie like this.
Then u can really see how huge this animal is.


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