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Buying a new camera

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Buying a new camera

Unread postby ils » Thu Aug 26, 2010 11:24 pm

Hi all!!

I am in the market to buy a new camara! What would yu suggest is a good buy and user friendly?
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Re: Buying a new camera

Unread postby pietert » Sun Aug 29, 2010 7:22 pm

What do you want to use it for and what are you willing to spend? Will you be able to swop lenses between pictures or do you need a versatile camera with which you can meet an opportunity within very short time frames.
If the last situation sounds right to you, I have experience of the Nikon P100 and am very happy with it. 26 times optical zoom, 10 megapixel, good stability, a good video ability all at a good price.

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Re: Buying a new camera

Unread postby Ranred » Sun Sep 05, 2010 6:39 pm

Pietert gives good advice- your first criteria to ponder is purpose and functionality.

If you are interested in good quality photos with the least amount of hassle and lesser price then a so called point-and-shoot camera is your ideal. However these cameras do have their drawbacks: since their lens is of the fixed kind it has relatively limited 'range'; their functionality is limited and image quality is less than that of a DSLR (this does not apply to all point-and-shoot cameras as a number of this kind of camera from brands such as Canon, Nikon, Sony, etc produce excellent quality images and video).

The alternative is the DSLRs. Although they can be more of a hassle and are much more expensive, they have an incredible range (due to the plentiful number of lenses designed specifically for each camera), they have virtually unlimited functionality, they produce images of incredible quality (generally), they are user friendly (again, generally) and can be used for years to come (I'm using my fathers old kit.) ( And some people are still using old film SLR cameras!). However the major drawback is price. Both the actual camera itself and the lenses one can purchase are often very expensive.

I hope this can help you in some way. I apologize if my advice is not helpful or is confusing.
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