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Clouds of Southern Africa's skys

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Batmad
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Clouds of Southern Africa's skys

Unread postby Batmad » Fri Aug 21, 2009 6:44 pm

Now that i am learning about clouds in Geography and on my FGASA course it is starting up an interest in my head.....

First of all the different types of clouds here in SA

1- Cirrocumulus (High cloud)
2- Cirrus (High cloud)
3- Cirrostratus (High Cloud)
4- Altocumulus (Middle cloud)
5- Altostratus (Middle cloud)
6- Nimbostratus (Low cloud)
7- Stratocumulus (Low cloud)
8- Stratus (Low cloud)
9- Cumulus (Vertical development)
10- Cumulonimbus (Thunderstorm)

*The above info is taken from the FGASA level 1 learner's manual*

Cirrocumulas-

These clouds are small'ish and are genrally grouped or in lines.

Cirrus-

This cloud is a feather like cloud which is one of the highest along with the other cirrus type clouds.
This cloud generally occurs at 6000-12000m.
The edge of the cloud normally curls in a feather like fashion.

Cirrostratus-

This cloud is also found at the above height and is more of a layer of a cloud.
When this formation occurs it normally shows that a warm front is on its way.
It also normally gives the sun and moon a halo effect.
This is a spectacular thing to witness!
A large ring forms around the moon or sun.
I have personally seen the moon halo twice and it is marvelous!


I shall do Altocumulus, Altostratus and Nimbostratus soon...
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2014 Birding Big Year- A 365 Day quest for 800 Species of Southern African Birds
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Batmad
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Re: Clouds of Southern Africa's skys

Unread postby Batmad » Sat Aug 22, 2009 10:47 am

Like i said above the Cirrostratus cloud is magnificent to witness!
Keep an eye out for it if you in the southern hemisphere when you go out into your garden at night......Have a look at the moon and you might be able to see it. 8)
Avid birder, wildlife enthusiast and photographer with a special interest in Bats

2014 Birding Big Year- A 365 Day quest for 800 Species of Southern African Birds
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bentley
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Re: Clouds of Southern Africa's skys

Unread postby bentley » Mon Aug 24, 2009 9:52 am

Will defintely keep my eyes peeled to view the halo effect, so a person could give a weather forecast by watching the clouds :hmz:
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Re: Clouds of Southern Africa's skys

Unread postby Nannie » Sat Feb 20, 2010 10:32 am

Hi, Batmad saw this at 12.56 some time ago, we where on top of Mathekenyane Granokop off the H1-1, having a bite to eat.
Have read somewhere what it is but can not find it.
If i remember correctly it is not a common occurrence.


Image
Last edited by Nannie on Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Bennievis
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Re: Clouds of Southern Africa's skys

Unread postby Bennievis » Fri Feb 26, 2010 10:22 pm

The following question was asked in my son's geography class the other day..
"Class.. where does one find Stratocumulus clouds?"
The answer promptly came...
"In the sky Sir..!

Class disrupted...

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Re: Clouds of Southern Africa's skys

Unread postby Nannie » Thu Mar 04, 2010 9:42 pm

Found it, it's called "cloud iridescence" or irisation and is a diffraction phenomenon.
It is normally caused by small water droplets or ice crystals of similar size within a cloud.
The cloud must be optically thin so that most rays encounter only a single droplet.
Newly forming clouds produce the brightest and most colourful iridescence because their droplets are all of the same size.
This also normally occurs at between 6 to 13 degrees from the sun.


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