Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 6 of 12
 [ 167 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ... 12  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:44 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2006 9:36 pm
Posts: 135
Location: Port Elizabeth
Albert wrote:
Good tip for spotting snakes, particularly in winter: Have a look at the "sunny" side of old termite mounds in mid-morning.


Thanks for the tip Albert, but I'll stay on the shady side! :)

_________________
The golden rule of life - Do unto others as you want done unto yourself


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:55 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2005 7:10 pm
Posts: 1451
Location: Golden Mile,West Coast, CFG
luislang wrote:
Thanks for the tip Albert, but I'll stay on the shady side! :)


but your avatar is a snake :? :shock:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 10:36 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2006 9:36 pm
Posts: 135
Location: Port Elizabeth
Jay wrote:

but your avatar is a snake :? :shock:


Jay if it is a python on the sunny side I'll have a good look as I have not seen one in the wild yet, but all the venimous one's I steer clear of. The avatar is there to give Jumbo and SO the kreeps. :) :lol:
On my way to Kruger now so I hope to see the python at Biyamiti in the hammerkop nest. Cheers :lol:
See also member activities / your alias for explanation.

_________________
The golden rule of life - Do unto others as you want done unto yourself


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:30 am 
mfb wrote:
like all the "spitters" ... the primary defence of the mfezi is to spit through it's modified fangs ... the cytotoxic venom is sprayed towards the eyes (although i had one that spat everywhere except at my face :lol: ) ... anyway ... the venom causes inflammation of the eyes and is extremely painful (caused by the cytotoxic component) and thus allowing the snake to make good it's escape


Mfb, how does the clinical symptoms differ between being spit in the eyes by a Moz. Cobra compared to a Rinkhals that only has neurotoxic venom?
Another stupid question: How is it possible for one snake to catch another poisonous snake? Does the venom of a Moz. Cobra actually kill a puffadder, and on the other hand, is the Moz. Cobra immune to the venom of the puffadder?


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:15 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 10:16 pm
Posts: 57
Location: JHB
Jumbo,

the ringhals venom does contain a cytoxin which is cardiotoxic in nature (it breaks down red blood cells) this is what causes the damages your eyes. As for the second part of your question I will have to dig a little bit, but for any cobra puff-adder is very much on the dinner list.

_________________
The popular argument for destroying rather than protecting snakes is lack of knowledge, and yet there is no valid excuse for this - Austin James Stevens


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:18 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2006 1:03 pm
Posts: 143
Location: One foot in the car, the other still in the office!
Cool topic. I watched a national geographic special on King Cobras the other day and saw one trying to kill a spectacled cobra and eat it. According to the narrator the King must avoid being bitten and will therefore not eat if its not hungry because the danger is not worth it. I presume this applies to the MSC/Puff Adder dinner party as well. On a somewhat unrelated topic but interesting anecdote, about 15 years ago there was a German Baker in Hout Bay who was making exotic pies. One of them was a puff adder pie which were apprently delicious. Sorry but it grossed me out - could not bear to think of eating snake.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2006 4:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue May 02, 2006 11:07 am
Posts: 215
Location: Western Cape
Just to show I wasn't kidding about the sunny side of the termite mounds....
Image

_________________
Moving on...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 9:46 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2006 1:03 pm
Posts: 143
Location: One foot in the car, the other still in the office!
Wow, cool pic Albert

You've taught me something - I hope that now I'll see more snakes seen as how I now have an extra place to look for them. Is that a MSC? Its looking right at you! :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 16, 2006 9:12 am 
nunu wrote:
I watched a national geographic special on King Cobras the other day and saw one trying to kill a spectacled cobra and eat it. According to the narrator the King must avoid being bitten and will therefore not eat if its not hungry because the danger is not worth it. I presume this applies to the MSC/Puff Adder dinner party as well. On a somewhat unrelated topic but interesting anecdote, about 15 years ago there was a German Baker in Hout Bay who was making exotic pies. One of them was a puff adder pie which were apprently delicious. Sorry but it grossed me out - could not bear to think of eating snake.


Nunu, I’ve heard that people in the Karoo area also eat puffadders. Apparently the meat almost taste like chicken. (IMHO, I will rather stick to real chicken if I want a chicken taste :roll: )

As for snakes killing and eating other snakes: I think they have to be immune against the venom of their prey. They swallow the other snake with its venom and all…? :?

Concerning getting Moz. Cobra spit in the eyes: A lady told me last week that her SO got spit in the eyes. Apparently it was so painful that the doctors had to sedate him for some time till the venom was “neutralized” :shock:


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 16, 2006 6:59 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 10:16 pm
Posts: 57
Location: JHB
Jumbo wrote:
As for snakes killing and eating other snakes: I think they have to be immune against the venom of their prey. They swallow the other snake with its venom and all…? :?


the venom will not affect them unless it enters the bloodstream, so you could drink the venom if you were sure didn;t have any cuts or ulcers etc etc... without a worry

Quote:
Concerning getting Moz. Cobra spit in the eyes: A lady told me last week that her SO got spit in the eyes. Apparently it was so painful that the doctors had to sedate him for some time till the venom was “neutralized” :shock:


*touch wood* ... never happened to me but I have heard it's extremly painful

_________________
The popular argument for destroying rather than protecting snakes is lack of knowledge, and yet there is no valid excuse for this - Austin James Stevens


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:58 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2006 3:39 pm
Posts: 47
Location: Hermanus
Once we stayed at Shingwedzi. The morning brought to us a huge surprise. During the night a python wanted to say hello to us, we could clearly see its spoor marks in the sand. Why it had to leave its droppings in one of my sandals - we can only speculate... We couldn't stop laughing for quite a while!

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Camp Snakes?
Unread postPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 10:21 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:23 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Potchefstroom
We have been going to the Park for years, and never had any snake experiences (usually went in April and in the winter months)

That all changed when we start going in the summer..

In Mopani we have seen the most snakes, once on the nature path near the dam (moz. spitting cobra right in front of us) and the other time some harmless snake at the toilets by the cafeteria.

The scariest snake adventure was in December 2005 when we stayed in Shimuwini over Christmas, a black mamba was found at the cottage next to us and the staff on duty (camp manager was away for the weekend) was to afraid to move him. Me and my sisters are very, very afraid of snakes and we were to scared to walk around in the camp after that incident, not knowing where the snake is. (Incidently, that was surely the hottest temperatures we have ever experience in the Park, and as you know Shimuwini has only fans...).

Oh yeah, a few years ago when Lower-Sabie still used the old restaurant, i stepped on a snake while walking back to our car after dinner, I made a u-turn in the air :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 6:56 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Posts: 5265
Location: Chasing down the rarities
luislang wrote:
We always go to the park during winter and never have we seen so many snakes as this time!...June. 3 Puffies , a green and a black mamba.


You get green mambas in Kruger?

_________________
656
Latest Lifer(s): White-winged Flufftail, Dickinson's Kestrel, Senegal Coucal, Three-banded Courser, African Broadbill, Thrush Nightingale, Rufous-bellied Heron.

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 1:23 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 10:38 pm
Posts: 155
Location: Texas, USA
wildtuinman wrote:
luislang wrote:
We always go to the park during winter and never have we seen so many snakes as this time!...June. 3 Puffies , a green and a black mamba.


You get green mambas in Kruger?


Not according to this: :hmz:

"The Black Mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) is perhaps the most feared and most notorious snake in southern Africa. Unlike its counterpart, the green mamba, which has never been found in the Park, it is widespread and common throughout the area. Despite the common name this mamba is never black, but generally grayish-brown above with a grayish-white belly. Adults more than four meters long have been recorded, but these were exceptional and a three-meter length is more common."
http://www.krugerpark.com/resources/reptiles/snakes.htm


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2006 7:21 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar
Award: Birder of the Year (2013)
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:27 am
Posts: 5265
Location: Chasing down the rarities
I once saw a heck of a long green snake crossing the tar road @ a rate of knots just north of Satara. I assumed it to be a boomslang.

_________________
656
Latest Lifer(s): White-winged Flufftail, Dickinson's Kestrel, Senegal Coucal, Three-banded Courser, African Broadbill, Thrush Nightingale, Rufous-bellied Heron.

Follow me as I bird on Twitter @wildtuinman


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 167 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ... 12  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by swartj at 19:10:55 Submitted by Anonymous at 19:54:33 Submitted by Luriebird at 20:47:33 Submitted by LesleyWilson at 06:22:33