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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2006 6:58 am 
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This Puff Adder was photgraphed at the Satara Camp fence in November 2005. It was there for about 5 days before we left -and each day it was facing a different direction...

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2006 10:43 am 
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Nice pic Shumba....is anyone as agitated about the cigarette butt lying next to it as I am? :evil: :evil:

Something I have noticed, not just in the park but EVERYWHERE, cigarette butts are the most common form of litter...I know that the smokers on this forum have mentioned before how careful they are not to litter, but walk around with your head down and you realise just how many smokers are litter bugs! :evil: It is impossible that any person reading this would do something like that but it is my pet hate.

Penny, did you get any photos of the Adders at Talamati that October?

The best snake sighting we ever had in the park was of a just under 2 metre long Rock Python, it was slowly crossing a gravel road North West of Letaba...huge.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2006 11:31 am 
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Sigggghhhh no Bushmad - it was in the days when we went to the Park not even in possession of a camera never mind a digital camera. We had a very old (good for its day) video camera but filming at night was an absolute no-no. Nowadays it is all so easy isn't it. Funny we did not bother so much with cameras in those days - we were only too happy to be seeing such wonderful things!

We have seen wonderful pythons in the Park. We had a magnificent 3 metre phython on the S25 one year. On another occasion a python that stretched edge to edge of the Lower Sabie road crossed in front of us and then disappeared literally! On a night drive with Billie from Croc bridge we came across a python that was hunting doves on the road - interestingly enough it was blind in one eye!

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:52 am 
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Never seen a snake in a camp but at night I can warn you not to walk around barefoot for the possibility on nightadders and the likes.

Saw plenty of puffadders on my recent trip. :shock:

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 11:30 am 
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Snoobab wrote:
My son for some wierd reason is snake mad, everytime we go to kruger he says he is going to see a snake and yet we have never seen snakes in Kruger anywhere.
IMHO I would consider a snake sighting to be a good sighting as they are not seen too often by lots of people.

What do you mean weird?? :lol: I've been fascinated by snakes myself for a long time; used to catch snakes when I was a kid (OK since then I've become "careful"). Good tip for spotting snakes, particularly in winter: Have a look at the "sunny" side of old termite mounds in mid-morning. We've found this to be a very successful technique for finding snakes, particularly in the northern part of the park.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 12:35 pm 
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This topic is right up my alley. They say Shingwedzi is home to many moz spitting cobras. However, I have only seen a black mamba there, it was in the ablution block - eeeekkkk.
Had a pair of grass snakes living in the thatch of our hut in mopani for two or three years, actually quite cute once you get over it. I never walk around barefoot at night and not without a torch either. As I mentioned on another thread we saw a python at Mopani one night and saw a mamba at Olifants one night when we drive my elderly grandparents back from the restaurant. Quite glad we were not on foot.

My favourite snake story is from an extended family long weekend at Balule. We had booked out the whole camp and the guys made a huge fire that night. At some point the fire started getting low and some bright spark thought it would be a good idea to pick up an old hollow log that was lying nearby and slap it on the fire. As the log duly heated up a snake (don't know what it was and didnt hang around to see), who was minding its own business and sleeping inside must have woken up hot. He came slithering out at a mean speed straight at one of my cousins who got such a fright he managed to the two metre jump over the fire to the other side with ease!


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 Post subject: Camp snakes?
Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 1:51 pm 
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We had only two "snake-encounters" in all the years of visiting Kruger.
A few years back there was a juvenile (quite small) python in Letaba camp wich caused great exitement. I felt very sorry for the poor thing - it just wanted to get away from all the attention.
In January we camped in Shingwidzi - for those of you who know the camping area well - right next to the clump of lala palms near the old ablution block.One eveing a guy in a bakkie came up to us and told us they had just seen a snake disappear in there! It was dark already so there was nothing we could do. We actually forgot about it until the next evening, when after our braai - it was about 9h30 - I walked to the ablution block and there it was again.
To make a long story short, one of the campers was an expert on snakes. He immediately identified it as a Mozambican Spitting Cobra and with the help of my broom and a mop borrowed from the ablution block caught the snake! He said it was one of the biggest he had ever seen!!
Now - what to do with it?! I volunteered my bucket which had a lid (my husband was not at all impressed!!) and the snake spent the night in the bucket inside one of the black dustbins.
The next morning we contacted the camp management. Eventually, after quite a while, a whole bakkie-full of park officials arrived. In the end, the guy who caught the snake had to go with them to release it in the veld - not one of them was prepared to come near it!!!
I must add, the snake was never aggresive - it just wanted to get away. This guy also told us that these cobras hunt at night - so, never walk around after dark without a flashlight.


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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:44 pm 
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Albert wrote:
Good tip for spotting snakes, particularly in winter: Have a look at the "sunny" side of old termite mounds in mid-morning.


Thanks for the tip Albert, but I'll stay on the shady side! :)

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 10:36 pm 
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Jay wrote:

but your avatar is a snake :? :shock:


Jay if it is a python on the sunny side I'll have a good look as I have not seen one in the wild yet, but all the venimous one's I steer clear of. The avatar is there to give Jumbo and SO the kreeps. :) :lol:
On my way to Kruger now so I hope to see the python at Biyamiti in the hammerkop nest. Cheers :lol:
See also member activities / your alias for explanation.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:30 am 
mfb wrote:
like all the "spitters" ... the primary defence of the mfezi is to spit through it's modified fangs ... the cytotoxic venom is sprayed towards the eyes (although i had one that spat everywhere except at my face :lol: ) ... anyway ... the venom causes inflammation of the eyes and is extremely painful (caused by the cytotoxic component) and thus allowing the snake to make good it's escape


Mfb, how does the clinical symptoms differ between being spit in the eyes by a Moz. Cobra compared to a Rinkhals that only has neurotoxic venom?
Another stupid question: How is it possible for one snake to catch another poisonous snake? Does the venom of a Moz. Cobra actually kill a puffadder, and on the other hand, is the Moz. Cobra immune to the venom of the puffadder?


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Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:15 pm 
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Jumbo,

the ringhals venom does contain a cytoxin which is cardiotoxic in nature (it breaks down red blood cells) this is what causes the damages your eyes. As for the second part of your question I will have to dig a little bit, but for any cobra puff-adder is very much on the dinner list.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2006 4:03 pm 
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Just to show I wasn't kidding about the sunny side of the termite mounds....
Image

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Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2006 9:46 am 
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Wow, cool pic Albert

You've taught me something - I hope that now I'll see more snakes seen as how I now have an extra place to look for them. Is that a MSC? Its looking right at you! :wink:


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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 16, 2006 6:59 pm 
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Jumbo wrote:
As for snakes killing and eating other snakes: I think they have to be immune against the venom of their prey. They swallow the other snake with its venom and all…? :?


the venom will not affect them unless it enters the bloodstream, so you could drink the venom if you were sure didn;t have any cuts or ulcers etc etc... without a worry

Quote:
Concerning getting Moz. Cobra spit in the eyes: A lady told me last week that her SO got spit in the eyes. Apparently it was so painful that the doctors had to sedate him for some time till the venom was “neutralized” :shock:


*touch wood* ... never happened to me but I have heard it's extremly painful

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 Post subject: Camp Snakes?
Unread postPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 10:21 am 
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Location: Potchefstroom
We have been going to the Park for years, and never had any snake experiences (usually went in April and in the winter months)

That all changed when we start going in the summer..

In Mopani we have seen the most snakes, once on the nature path near the dam (moz. spitting cobra right in front of us) and the other time some harmless snake at the toilets by the cafeteria.

The scariest snake adventure was in December 2005 when we stayed in Shimuwini over Christmas, a black mamba was found at the cottage next to us and the staff on duty (camp manager was away for the weekend) was to afraid to move him. Me and my sisters are very, very afraid of snakes and we were to scared to walk around in the camp after that incident, not knowing where the snake is. (Incidently, that was surely the hottest temperatures we have ever experience in the Park, and as you know Shimuwini has only fans...).

Oh yeah, a few years ago when Lower-Sabie still used the old restaurant, i stepped on a snake while walking back to our car after dinner, I made a u-turn in the air :wink:


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